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AI in Tourism

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AI in Tourism

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This is a presentation delivered by Katie King at the UKInbound tourism conference, on "How can marketing professionals adapt to survive & thrive in a world of AI?"

https://www.ukinbound.org/events/tourism-marketing-in-a-digital-age-seminar/

This is a presentation delivered by Katie King at the UKInbound tourism conference, on "How can marketing professionals adapt to survive & thrive in a world of AI?"

https://www.ukinbound.org/events/tourism-marketing-in-a-digital-age-seminar/

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AI in Tourism

  1. 1. How can marketing professionals adapt to survive & thrive in a world of AI? Presentation by Katie King at the UKinbound tourism conference https://www.ukinbound.org/events/tou rism-marketing-in-a-digital-age- seminar/
  2. 2. Introduction – Katie King, MBA  28 year marketing career  CEO of AI in Marketing  MD of Zoodikers  Co-founder of AI in FM  TEDx speaker  Chairperson of a PRCA Group  Commentator on BBC TV and radio
  3. 3. AI in our daily lives
  4. 4. Business 4.0 is re-shaping marketing
  5. 5. 4th industrial revolution
  6. 6. Definition
  7. 7. What is AI?
  8. 8. UK industrial strategy
  9. 9. Marketing paranoia and hype
  10. 10. A new marketing paradigm
  11. 11. Marketing and customer centricity  According to Gartner research, chatbots will account for 85% of all customer service by 2020.  This is by far one of the most promising technologies to hit the travel industry, reducing overhead for all sectors by cutting out human capital and replacing these resources with AI.  These AI bots are capable of organizing travel plans and troubleshooting, transferring customers to actual agents when the conversation supersedes their capabilities.  Those who have adopted AI bots, have engineered their own solutions, outfitting their business with bots who know the company architecture inside and out.
  12. 12. Use cases of AI in the tourism industry
  13. 13. Survey of business travellers  More than half of business travellers believe AI can make business trips safer, according to new research from expense, travel and invoice management firm SAP Concur.  52% said the use of technologies such as predictive risk alerts around natural disasters would decrease the risk of business travel.  75% said they believed AI would be the engine room of a more personalised experience.  Despite this, the research identified a gap between what respondents thought AI should be able to do and their willingness to share data.  The most popular types of data people were prepared to share were email (54%), travel preferences (52%) and their gender (46%).  The data people were reluctant to share included residence (25%), biometrics (27%) and phone number (33%).
  14. 14. Survey of business travellers  When asked to imagine that their future business trip was supported by AI, respondents outlined automated travel expensing (23%), automated recommended actions based on events such as flights being cancelled (19%) and personalised recommendations relating to restaurants (18%) as their top three perceived advantages.  12 per cent said that they thought chat bots for travel bookings would be beneficial. This is perhaps not surprising as chat bots were the third type of AI platform that sprung to people’s minds when they thought of AI. First and second were voice assistants (64%) and language-capable robots (50%).
  15. 15. Face-to-Face Customer Service  While the use of AI for powering online customer service is now relatively commonplace, one of the emerging trends is for the technology to be used for face-to-face customer service interactions too.  It can cut queues at information or reception desks, and improve overall efficiency.  The AI robot ‘Connie’ has been deployed by Hilton. This robot uses AI & speech recognition to provide tourist information to customers who speak to it. Each human interaction also helps to teach the robot, improving the quality of all future communications.
  16. 16. Personalisation and prediction  Travel is stressful, especially for railway passengers. So why not use machine learning to analyze the vast quantities of data now available to create a contextually rich, highly personalised, and fully predictive journey?  In the UK, online rail booking service Trainline has use crowdsourced data to create a bot that advises passengers where they’re most likely to find a seat, depending on the location and direction of their specific journey.
  17. 17. Skyscanner chatbot  Chatbot technology is another big strand of AI, and unsurprisingly, many travel brands have already launched their own versions in the past year or so.  Skyscanner is just one example, creating a bot to help consumers find flights in Facebook Messenger. Users can also use it to request travel recommendations and random suggestions.
  18. 18. Personalisation and big data  AI in the travel sector has already started to change the way people are searching and booking their travel. These range from algorithms that are constantly refining how options are ranked on people's favourite website, data collected from the apps on phone, sentiments shared on social media etc.  AI is helping travel companies to provide highly-tailored offers based on customers' needs and preferences. Past behaviours can obviously feed computers to predict future purchase actions.
  19. 19. Search: Voice powered hotel rooms  With the help of Marriott International, Amazon announced debut of Alexa for Hospitality, a division of the company committed to placing Amazon’s smart home devices into hotel rooms, vacation rentals, and other hospitality settings.  By harnessing IoT, voice assistants like the Amazon Echo are able to help guests control the lighting and temperature in their rooms, make calls and requests to the front desk, play music, check the weather, or play entertainment on the in-room television, for example.
  20. 20. Tokyo hotel 100% staffed by robots
  21. 21. Tokyo hotel 100% staffed by robots  Henn na Hotel became the hotel group’s first hotel staffed by robots. The hotel’s team of multilingual robots (including dinosaurs) greet you upon your arrival and assist you with check-in and checkout, while the robotic arm at the cloakroom will takes care of your luggage.  With the use of facial recognition technology, you can enter your room without using the room key.  The hotel also uses state-of-the art technologies to offer guests a high degree of comfort. These include the smart air conditioning system, which can draw heat from your body to cool you down, or keep heat from escaping your body when you feel cold. www.h-n-h.jp/en/
  22. 22. Customer service In September 2017, United Airlines announced a collaboration with Amazon Alexa called “United skill.” The app reportedly allows Alexa users to find answers to the most common questions about United flights by communicating through natural language. Once users add “United skill” to their existing Alexa app, they are able to ask Alexa common questions about flight statuses, flight times and amenities. Though United skill, examples of commands that Alexa can process include: “Alexa, ask United: what is the status of flight 959?” “Alexa, ask United: does flight 869 have Wi-Fi?” “Alexa, ask United to check me in.”
  23. 23. Impact on jobs
  24. 24. Predictions
  25. 25. Impact on jobs  AI will eliminate 1.8M jobs but create 2.3M by 2020, claims Gartner  Artificial intelligence will augment workers and become a 'net job creator' by 2020 according to new research.
  26. 26. Future jobs  So fast, in fact, that 85 per cent of the jobs that will exist in 2030 haven't even been invented yet, estimates the report, which was authored by the Institute for the Future (IFTF) and a panel of 20 tech, business and academic experts from around the world.  "The pace of change will be so rapid that people will learn 'in the moment' using new technologies such as augmented reality and virtual reality. The ability to gain new knowledge will be more valuable than the knowledge itself," Dell Technologies said in a statement.  Get ready for a lifetime of skills training and retraining, in real time.
  27. 27. How can marketing professionals prepare
  28. 28. How can you prepare?  The right mindset  Clear mid and long term business strategy. Control your own agenda  (Re)training: closing the skills gap. You, your staff, your clients, your family  Human traits; intuition and creativity  Talent and culture: what are we in business for?
  29. 29. How can you prepare?  Hire/attract the right people. Data scientists…  Funding: e.g. Innovate UK or Crowdfunding  Partner  Innovate  Be bold and experiment
  30. 30. Implications for marketing
  31. 31. Black box  The problem is that we will see the initial input and the final output, but we don’t know the intermediate steps that will be taken autonomously by the neural network.  To give AI technologies a sense of maturity, we will need to implement methods to check, debug, and understand the decision-making process of machines.
  32. 32. Q & A
  33. 33. https://twitter.com/katieeking https://www.instagram.com/katiekingzoodikers/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/katieeking/ https://www.aiinmarketing.com/ +44 (0) 7525 727288 katie@zoodikers.com Please get in touch https://www.facebook.com/AIinMarketing

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