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Change through persuasion

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Change through persuasion

  1. 1. GROUP: NUMBER ONE 1. LE THI HOANG LAN 2. TRUONG THI XUAN THAO 3. DO THI TUYET NHUNG 4. TRAN NGAN HA
  2. 2. WHY IS CHANGE SO HARD?  Most people are reluctant to alter their habits;  What worked in the past is good enough;  Resistance is even stronger if the organization has q succession of leaders;  „Call for sacrifice and self discipline is met with cynicism, skepticism and resistance. 2
  3. 3. For change to stick, leaders must design and run an effective persuasion campaign To create a continuously receptive environment for change 3
  4. 4. THE FOUR PHASES OF A PERSUASION CAMPAIGN Example: The turnaround of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston was managed by Paul Levy, who became CEO in early 2002. 4
  5. 5. BIDMC’S PROBLEM? - A misguided focus on clinical practice rather than backroom integration - A failure to cut costs - The repeated inability to execute plans and adapt to changing conditions in the health care marketplace  The hospital was losing $50 million a year  Relations between the administration and medical staff as well as between management and the board of directors were strained  Employees felt demoralized, having witnessed the disappointing failure of its past leaders. 5
  6. 6. PHASE 1. SETTING THE STAGE 6 Convince employees that radical change is imperative; demonstrate why the new direction is the right one
  7. 7. PHASE 1. SETTING THE STAGE In BIDMC: Levy… …Chose to act as the managerial equivalent of a good doctor …Developed a bold message that provided compelling reasons to do things differently and then cast that message in capital letters to signal the arrival of a new order. …Described the open management style he would adopt. 7
  8. 8. PHASE 2. CREATING THE FRAME 8 Effective leaders need to help employees interpret the plans for change. With complex plans, skilled leaders use “frame” to provide context and shape perspective. This way, leaders can help people digest ideas in particular way.
  9. 9. PHASE 2. CREATING THE FRAME 9 FOR BIDMC A detailed email memo 1st part – modify critics, reduce the fears of doctors and nurses 2nd part – provide further detailed about the turnaround plan 3rd part – anticipate and respond to prospective concerns
  10. 10. PHASE 3. MANAGING THE MOOD  Leaders must pay close attention to employees’ emotions – the ebb and flow of their feelings and moods - and work hard to preserve a receptive climate for change.  This requires a delicate balancing between presenting good and bad news in just the right proportion.  Employees need to feel that their sacrifices have not been in vain and their accomplishments have been recognized and rewarded.  Communication must strike the right notes of optimistic and realism and carefully calibrate the timing, tone, and positioning of every messages. 10
  11. 11. PHASE 3. MANAGING THE MOOD 11 For BIDMC: Challenges for leader (Paul Levy): • To give remaining employees to grieve and recover from layoffs and other difficult measures • To make them feel that he cared for and supported them • To ensure that the turnaround plan proceeded apace.
  12. 12. PHASE 3. MANAGING THE MOOD 12 FOR BIDMC Actions: balance bad news and good news To acknowledge employees’ feeling of depression while helping them look to the future • In an email, Levy explicitly empathized with employees’ feelings and then urged employees to look forward and concluded on a strongly optimistic note. To keep employees focused on the continuing hard work ahead • Spoke plainly about the need to control costs and reminded employees that merit pay increase would remain on hold.
  13. 13. PHASE 4. REINFORCING GOOD HABITS 13 EFFECTIVE CHANGE LEADER should: • Personally model new ways of working and provide coaching and support. • Explicitly reinforce organizational values on a constant basis, using action to back up their words. • Recognize that many staff simply do not know how to make decisions as a group or work cooperatively, and accordingly delegate critical decisions and responsibilities to provide them with ample opportunities to practice new ways of working.
  14. 14. PHASE 4. REINFORCING GOOD HABITS 14 FOR BIDMC - Levy had established meeting rules requiring staff to state their objections to decision and to “disagree without being disagreeable”. - When one medical chief emailed Levy, complained about a decision had made during a meeting and copied the other chief and board chairman- Levy took action. - He responded the email with the same audience publicly reprimanding the chief for his tone, lack of civility, and the failure to follow the rule about speaking up during meetings.
  15. 15. CONCLUSION 15 In a receptive environment, employees not only understand why change is necessary; they’re also emotionally committed to making it happen, and they faithfully execute the required steps.
  16. 16. 16 THANK YOU FOR YOUR LISTENING !

Notes de l'éditeur

  • Because most people are reluctant to alter their habits, change is so hard. Resistance to change even stronger if an organization has had a succession of leaders. Employees tend to assume that new leaders “just like all the others”.
  • ... Leaders must develop and implement an effective persuasion campaign before the actual turnaround plan set in concrete. The goal of …. (slide)
  • The four phases of a persuasion campaign: first of all, leaders need to set the stage of acceptance, convince employees that changes are compulsory; then, create the frame to interpret information as well as issue a set of instructions. In the next phrase, they must manage the mood in order to make employees support, implement and follow the plan. Finally, at a critical intervals, they must provide reinforcement to ensure that the desired changes take hold without backsliding.

    Based on the article, David A. Garvin and Michael A. Roberto have described this process in more detail through an example of the impressive turnaround at a world-renowned teaching hospital. In this organization, Paul Levy, who became CEO in early 2002, managed to bring the failing hospital back from the brink of ruin (about to be bankrupted).
  • BIDMC was the product of a difficult merger between two hospital – Beth Israel and Deaconess – each of which has different reputations, several best-in-the-world departments and deeply devoted staffs. The problems happened after the merger. (slide)
    By the time the board settle on levy…(slide)
  • The purpose of this phrase in that turnaround leaders must gain trust that they are the right leaders for the job as well as convince people that radical changes are required for the organization to survive. Therefore, employees will ready to listen to tough messages, question old assumptions, and consider new ways of working.
    Otherwise, there is little hope for sustained improvement.
  • => Emulate and embody the core values of the hospital culture.
    => Publicize the real possibility the hospital would be sold because he believed that a strong wake-up call was necessary to get employees to face up the situation.
    => Walking around, lunching with staff, talking with employees at every opportunity to discover their concerns, communicating directly with employees through email rather than through intermediaries.
  • the ebb and flow (= rhythm/ up and down): to decrease and then increase, then decrease; as with tides;
    receptive =ready or willing to receive favorably

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