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Adventures in Linked Open Data
Monika Szunejko
June 2015
Libraries in the semantic web
Marcia Zeng
@ ANU Library – 26 June 2015
Opportunities and challenges
• How can we do more with what we have?
• How can we do more with less?
• How can we use the ...
• Turning the end point into a starting point
– FRBR +
• Obtain/find/identify/select/EXPLORE
• http://www.agris.fao.org
• ...
Turn text into data
Big text → Big data
“oil without refining is of no use”
Digitisation ≠ findability & accessibility
From digitisation → datalisation
Kent State University – research teams
• Team 1: Linked Open Data LAM research
group
• http://lod-lam.slis.kent.edu
• Meta...
Kent State University – research teams
• Team 2: Smart Big Data – how can innovation
history be interpreted by/via data?
Charting culture
A paradigm shift in how cultural heritage materials
can be
• Searched
• Mined
• Displayed
• Taught
• Analysed using digita...
Content
• From ‘web of documents’ → ‘web of data’
• From ‘linking strings’ → ‘linking things’
Results
• From ‘on the web’ ...
Inspiring concepts
sharing
interoperability
linking
LODLAM Summit 2015
State Library of New South Wales
29 – 30 June 2015
LODLAM sessions
Day 1
Day 2
LODLAM
• Building GLAM directories
• LD for non-LD people
• Use cases for bibliographic data as LOD
• Vendor engagement – ...
Building GLAM directories
• We want to be found
• Data needs to be accurate
• Data should be single-sourced
• Data should ...
Vendor engagement – pt. 1 & 2
• Vendors want use cases for implementing LOD
• How we present use cases to vendors, busines...
The Manifesto
Given that libraries, museums and archives are often heavily dependent on their vendors (yada yada preamble)...
Learning Linked Data
Creating a technology platform
for learning linked data
http://lld.ischool.uw.edu/wp/
LODLAM challenge
Preservation data plans as linked open data
Preservation Planning Data
Adventures in linked open data   June 2015
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Adventures in linked open data June 2015

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Presentation to National Library of Australia staff on linked data events.

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Adventures in linked open data June 2015

  1. 1. Adventures in Linked Open Data Monika Szunejko June 2015
  2. 2. Libraries in the semantic web Marcia Zeng @ ANU Library – 26 June 2015
  3. 3. Opportunities and challenges • How can we do more with what we have? • How can we do more with less? • How can we use the LOD system?
  4. 4. • Turning the end point into a starting point – FRBR + • Obtain/find/identify/select/EXPLORE • http://www.agris.fao.org • http://www.numismatics.org/ocre • Turn ‘text’ into ‘data’
  5. 5. Turn text into data Big text → Big data “oil without refining is of no use”
  6. 6. Digitisation ≠ findability & accessibility From digitisation → datalisation
  7. 7. Kent State University – research teams • Team 1: Linked Open Data LAM research group • http://lod-lam.slis.kent.edu • Metadata • Fact mining • Knowledge Organisation systems (KOS)
  8. 8. Kent State University – research teams • Team 2: Smart Big Data – how can innovation history be interpreted by/via data?
  9. 9. Charting culture
  10. 10. A paradigm shift in how cultural heritage materials can be • Searched • Mined • Displayed • Taught • Analysed using digital technologies → new expectations of memory institutions
  11. 11. Content • From ‘web of documents’ → ‘web of data’ • From ‘linking strings’ → ‘linking things’ Results • From ‘on the web’ → ‘of the web’ Approaches / methods • From machine-readable → ‘machine understandable’ • From ‘machine-readable’ → ‘machine processable’
  12. 12. Inspiring concepts sharing interoperability linking
  13. 13. LODLAM Summit 2015 State Library of New South Wales 29 – 30 June 2015
  14. 14. LODLAM sessions Day 1 Day 2
  15. 15. LODLAM • Building GLAM directories • LD for non-LD people • Use cases for bibliographic data as LOD • Vendor engagement – pt.1 • Linking people • Data quality • Disambiguation • Vendor engagement – pt.2 - The Manifesto
  16. 16. Building GLAM directories • We want to be found • Data needs to be accurate • Data should be single-sourced • Data should be open • Schema.org offers a solution: – Consumed by search engines – Consumable by others www.schema.org
  17. 17. Vendor engagement – pt. 1 & 2 • Vendors want use cases for implementing LOD • How we present use cases to vendors, business cases internally • Incentives for vendors to align with our business needs • The manifesto
  18. 18. The Manifesto Given that libraries, museums and archives are often heavily dependent on their vendors (yada yada preamble).... VENDORS should… • Use and encourage established open standards. • Prefer open source components as parts of their workflow and provide a list of their own dependencies for the evaluation of the offering • Provide solutions that are modular and scalable, not monolithic. Allow “pluggable” components for specialty functionality (for example, OCR, entity extraction, etc). • Document these components in a way that explains the to the customer how they fit together. • Allow integration of systems through RESTful, open, unlicensed, non-rate-limited APIs • Not erect barriers to the full and complete access to the institution’s own data • Cultivate their communities of users, listen to them, and encourage them to talk to each other and pool their resources. • Safeguard against their own instability (through mechanisms such as code escrow, code transparency,etc). • Not be adversarial to integrating with systems supported by other vendors • Not proffer overly special treatment for vendors to integrate with their own products • Support experimentation by permitting custom code to run on development copies of the software THE CUSTOMER should… • Prefer vendors who are incentivizing open data formats and data sharing. • Be clear about their objectives, and try to be consistent about the language they use to • Do not over-specify requirements. Concentrate on describing what you want accomplished, not how to do it. Be open to innovation. (Hint: Ask open, leading questions on your request for proposal). • Be a good participant in the user community. • Be aware and respectful of the fact that some licenses are “sticky” and do not play well with some commercial models. BOTH PARTIES should… • Have a data exit strategy in mind when they enter into a commercial relationship – It should be as easy as possible to get data out of the system in a non-proprietary format at the end of a vendor engagement (or at any time) – The customer owns the data and it should not be encumbered by additional license agreements. • Concentrate on the smallest possible number of open standards
  19. 19. Learning Linked Data Creating a technology platform for learning linked data http://lld.ischool.uw.edu/wp/
  20. 20. LODLAM challenge Preservation data plans as linked open data Preservation Planning Data

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