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Some Medicinal plants & Their Uses

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Some Medicinal plants
Their Uses

Publié dans : Santé
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Some Medicinal plants & Their Uses

  1. 1. Medicinal plants have been identified and used throughout human history. Plants have the ability to synthesize a wide variety of chemical compounds that are used to perform important biological functions, and to defend against attack from predators such as insects, fungi and herbivorous mammals. At least 12,000 such compounds have been isolated so far; a number estimated to be less than 10% of the total.Chemical compounds in plants mediate their effect:on the human body through processes identical to those already well understood for the chemical compounds in conventional drugs; thus herbal medicines do not differ greatly from conventional drugs in terms of how they work. This enables herbal medicines to be as effective as conventional medicines, but also gives them the same potential to cause harmful side effects.
  2. 2. The use of plants as medicines predates written human history. Ethnobotany (the study of traditional human uses of plants) is recognized as an effective way to discover future medicines. In 2001, researchers identified 122 compounds used in modern medicine which were derived from "ethnomedical" plant sources; 80% of these have had an ethnomedical use identical or related to the current use of the active elements of the plant. Many of the pharmaceuticals currently available to physicians have a long history of use as herbal remedies, including aspirin, digitalis, quinine, and opium.
  3. 3. The use of plants as medicine predates written human history. Many of the herbs and spices used by humans to season food also yield useful medicinal compounds. The use of herbs and spices in cuisine developed in part as a response to the threat of food-borne pathogens. Studies show that in tropical climates where pathogens are the most abundant, recipes are the most highly spiced. Further, the spices with the most potent antimicrobial activity tend to be selected. In all cultures vegetables are spiced less than meat, presumably because they are more resistant to spoilage. Angiosperms (flowering plants) were the original source of most plant medicines. Many of the common weeds that populate human settlements, such as nettle, dandelion and chickweed, have medicinal properties.
  4. 4. 1. Ginger is one spice that I recommend keeping on hand in your kitchen at all times. Not only is it a wonderful addition to your cooking (especially paired with garlic) but it also has enough medicinal properties to fill several books. 2. Ginger is best known for its antinausea effects but also has broad-spectrum antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, and anti- parasitic properties, to name just several of its more than 40 scientifically confirmed pharmacological actions. It is anti- inflammatory, making it valuable for pain relief for joint pain, menstrual pain, headaches, and more. 3. Taking one gram of ginger daily may help reduce nausea and vomiting in pregnant women, or those with migraines and ginger has been shown to work better than a placebo in relieving morning sickness.
  5. 5. The medicinal uses of aloe vera are amazing, as the benefits of aloe vera remedies are truly significant. Aloe vera is well-loved by many, and a famed household plant. This plant is incredibly diverse in its uses. I invite you to come find out why you should consider having this wonderful, succulent plant in your home too.
  6. 6. i. Aloe vera is good for irritated or inflamed skin. ii. Aloe vera helps repair your skin from the most tender of wounds. iii. Aloe vera helps speed the process of healing to burns and other wounds. iv. Aloe vera is hydrating, rejuvenating and toning for your skin. v. Aloe vera moisturizes and softens your skin.
  7. 7. Most people are familiar with the traditional uses for lemons to soothe sore throats and add some citrus flavor to our foods. However the diversity of applications for lemons far exceeds general knowledge and once you read the following list, you’ll likely want to stock at least a few lemons in your kitchen 24-7.
  8. 8. Among the health benefits of lemon highlights its value as anticatarrhal, benefits blood circulation, capillary protector, antihypertensive, antispasmodic, diuretic, applied to the skin and mucous membranes is antibacterial and antifungal.
  9. 9. Tulsi also known as basil leaves, is a fairly common plant in Indian households. Considered holy by many religions, the tulsi plant is revered for its divine properties. Besides praying to the plant, a number of people advice including the leaves and roots of the plant in various medical decoctions.
  10. 10. i. Ancient Egyptians thought tulsi was a treatment for snakebites or stings from scorpions, but if you encounter either of these, seek treatment from a doctor instead. Many people also use fresh tulsi leaves to rub on mosquito bites to relieve discomfort. A tea made with tulsi combined with peppercorns is given as a treatment to reduce fever. The leaves of holy basil are used all over the world in cooking as a seasoning. ii. Immune Support iii. Stress Relief iv. Digestion Aid
  11. 11. Peppermint was first described in 1753 by Carl Linnaeus from specimens that had been collected in England; he treated it as a species, but it is now universally agreed to be a hybrid. It is a herbaceous rhizomatous perennial plant growing to 30– 90 cm (12–35 in) tall, with smooth stems, square in cross section. The rhizomes are wide-spreading, fleshy, and bare fibrous roots. The leaves are from 4–9 cm (1.6–3.5 in) long and 1.5–4 cm (0.59–1.57 in) broad, dark green with reddish veins, and with an acute apex and coarsely toothed margins. The leaves and stems are usually slightly fuzzy. The flowers are purple, 6–8 mm (0.24–0.31 in) long, with a four-lobed corolla about 5 mm (0.20 in) diameter; they are produced in whorls (verticillasters) around the stem, forming thick, blunt spikes. Flowering is from mid to late summer.
  12. 12. i. In addition to use as a seasoning and flavoring, peppermint is used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other GI conditions. Menthol is available in numerous commercial preparations used to treat respiratory tract infections and topically for its cooling and warming action to relieve pain. However, there is limited clinical information supporting its use for these conditions. ii. Peppermint oil has been used as a carminative at doses of 0.1 to 0.24 mL. Up to 1,200 mg of the oil in enteric-coated tablets has been used to treat IBS. Peppermint oil (40 mL) has been added to barium suspensions and also administered intraluminally (8 mL) during colonoscopy.
  13. 13. Papaya is a small, bushy tree with a hollow trunk, large palmate leaves, and oblong smooth-skinned fruits (melons). The melons are usually picked in a green state and allowed to ripen. When ripe, the flesh is sweet and juicy and similar in taste to other melons.
  14. 14. i. Papaya is used for preventing and treating gastrointestinal tract disorders, intestinal parasite infections, and as a sedative and diuretic. It is also used for nerve pains (neuralgia) and elephantoid growths. Elephantoid growths are large swollen areas of the body that are symptoms of a rare disorder of the lymphatic system caused by parasitic worms. ii. Papaya contains a chemical called papain, which is commonly used as a meat tenderizer.
  15. 15. i. Papaya contains a chemical called papain. Papain breaks down proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. That’s why it works as a meat tenderizer. However, papain is changed by digestive juices, so there is some question about whether it could be effective as a medicine when taken by mouth. ii. Papaya also contains a chemical called carpain. Carpain seems to be able to kill certain parasites, and it might affect the central nervous system.

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