Health financing in fragile & conflict affected settings

ReBUILD for Resilience
ReBUILD for ResilienceReBUILD for Resilience
Health financing in fragile and
conflict-affected states
Insights from preparatory work for a
WHO working paper
Sophie Witter & Maria Bertone,
IGHD/ReBUILD
Research for stronger health systems post conflict
Background
• Two billion people now live in situations affected by fragility and conflict
(World Bank 2018)
• Share of extreme poor living in conflict-affected situations is expected to
rise to almost 60% by 2030
• More than one third of maternal deaths occur in fragile states, and half of
the children who die before age five live in FCAS (Newbrander et al.,
2011)
• A recent study found that armed conflict substantially and persistently
increases infant mortality in Africa (Wagner et al., 2018)
• However, fragile states receive around 50% less aid than predicted,
despite their high needs (Graves et al., 2015)
• In this context, making progress towards universal health coverage (UHC)
and meeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is particularly
challenging
Rationale for work
• Improving health financing systems is critical to enable countries to raise
more resources for health and make good choices about how to use them.
• Technical guidance products developed in recent years, including health
financing diagnostic framework and guide to developing national HF
strategies
• However, the evidence of what works in these circumstances is limited.
There is no clear guidance on how to translate and apply the existing
lessons and principles on health financing for universal health coverage to
fragile situations.
Approach
• Initial meeting in November 2017, including health financing staff from WHO
Geneva, AFRO, EMRO; WHO health emergency programme and service delivery
team; and external agencies (UHC 2030, P4H, World Bank, and ReBUILD)
• In-depth consultation led by the WHO EMRO office in May 2018, focussed on
health financing in chronic and acute emergencies. More than 30 participants
attended, including WHO regional, head office and country level experts,
representatives from other partners such as the Global Fund, Ministry of Health
representatives from the region, academic experts and consultants
• Literature review in which data from 168 published and grey documents were
extracted, updating Witter 2012
• Limitations: non-systematic; varying quality and independent of studies
• Paper in draft which also draws on experience of team
Definitions: FCAS
Source: Call 2011
What does being FCAS mean for the health sector?
• Inability to provide health services to a large proportion of the population
• Lack of equity in who receives the available health services
• Ineffective or non-existent referral systems for the critically ill
• A lack of infrastructure (including facilities, human resources, equipment
and supplies, and medicines) for delivering health services
• Non-operational health information systems for planning, management
and disease surveillance
• Lack of policy mechanisms for developing, establishing and implementing
national health policies
• Insufficient coordination, oversight and monitoring of health services by
the emerging government, which may not have the capacity to manage
• Inadequate management capacity and systems (such as budgeting,
accounting and human resource management systems) for raising and
controlling resources
(Newbrander, Waldman, & Shepherd-Banigan 2011)
UHC goals and intermediate objectives influenced by health financing policy
Source: (Kutzin et al., 2017)
Revenue raising
and pooling
Summary of common challenges in FCAS settings Strategies adopted to
mitigate these (and gaps)
Desirable features:
- Increase flows
from public and
mandatory sources
- Increase
predictability and
stability of funds
- Enhance
redistribution of
prepaid funds
- Ensure that
funding sources are
complementary
- Reduce
fragmentation,
duplication and
overlaps
- Simplify financial
flows
• Low overall funding (though can in cases be high but
poorly distributed)
• Public funding is often low (low GDP growth; low
taxation; non-prioritisation of social sectors)
o May be multiple authorities collecting revenues
o Limited territorial control reduces government
revenue base
• Conflict tends to depress health expenditure (2%/year,
in one study), while raising needs (disrupted services,
displaced populations, etc.)
• High dependence on external funding (donors,
charities, remittances).
o Problems: instability; lack of predictability; and
lack of alignment with public priorities (e.g. high
volumes off-budget and off-plan)
o External support is varied by country: donors
preferred to provide more funding to low-income
fragile countries that have refugees or on-going
external interventions but tended to avoid
providing funding to countries with political
gridlock, flawed elections, or economic decline.
o FCAS associated with higher external finance for
MICs, not LICs (compared to non-FCAS LICs)
• Aid pooling and
coordination mechanisms,
including shadow alignment
• Policies to increase financial
access and decrease out of
pocket payments, including:
user fee exemptions, health
equity funds, health
insurance, demand side
financing
• Greater use of cash, card-
based and mobile
payments in humanitarian
settings
Revenue
raising and
pooling
Summary of common challenges in FCAS settings Strategies adopted to
mitigate these (and gaps)
o Assumption of decreasing financial dependency
post-shock not well studied; dependency is also
more than just financial
o External finance can be too low for needs, while also
being high relative to absorptive capacity (especially
if there is a post-crisis funding influx), leading to low
disbursement
• High levels of out of pocket payments, in contexts where
household incomes are often low and subject to shocks,
with high levels of health need
• Low trust undermines pooling – leads to lower levels of
prepayment; more fragmented risk pools
• Segmented population, especially where there are
substantial refugee and displaced populations having
varying protection
Gaps:
• More attention could be
paid to domestic resource
mobilisation, including from
natural resources as well as
remittances in some cases,
but challenge is to increase
tax equitably
• Also need for continued,
predictable and integrated
external funding for LICs
• How to harmonise/
integrate different
strategies to increase
access, including across
humanitarian and
development programmes,
and during (uneven)
transition away from aid
Proportion of general government expenditure devoted to health, FCAS countries, 2014
Source: authors’ calculation based on (WHO, 2018)
• Small but significant
difference in
government
commitment to health,
with FCAS countries as
whole averaging 9% of
government
expenditure on health,
compared to 12.5% for
non-FCAS countries
• This is largely driven by
differences in middle-
income countries
Source: authors’ calculation based on (WHO, 2018)
• Comparing out of
pocket payments by
income level, there is
a significant
difference between
FCAS and non-FCAS
countries in the low
income group, with a
mean of 43% out of
pocket payments in
the former, as against
31% for the latter.
• However, for middle
income groups, there
is no significant
difference between
FCAS and non-FCAS
countries, suggesting
that they are either
able to protect
through continued
pooling or only
experience shorter
term disruption.
Out of pocket payments (% of current health expenditure), FCAS countries, 2014
The dance of public financing and OOP…
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Iraq. Gov't and OOP (% THE). 2003-2015
Gov't OOP
2011-2013
Insurgency
Double shock:
ISIS + halving
of oil prices
Source: Global Health Expenditure Database (Modol, 2018)
• Overall expenditure on
health as a proportion
of GDP ranged widely
from less than 2% to
17% in 2014 for FCAS
countries, with means
of between 6-8%,
depending on the
income group.
• There was no significant
difference between
FCAS and non-FCAS
countries
• However, internal
composition changes
over time – OOP
increasing when public
finances are affected by
shocks, e.g. in Iraq
Purchasing Summary of common challenges in
FCAS settings
Strategies adopted to
mitigate these (and gaps)
Desirable features:
- Increase allocation of resources
to providers linked to
population health needs,
information on performance, or
a combination
- Move away from either rigid,
input-based line item budgets
or completely unmanaged fee-
for-service reimbursement
- Manage expenditure growth
- Move towards a unified data
platform on patient activity
• Multiple (uncoordinated and unaligned)
purchasers, with households often
dominant
• Data on and assessment of population
needs and provider performance is
limited and often fragmented
• Fee for service payment dominates in
private, informal sectors; public sector
commonly a mix of fixed (under-funded)
budgets and user fees; various forms of
contracting in humanitarian sector
• Lack of confidence in government by
donors → funding is often channelled
to (I)NGOs, leading to patchy provision
and often higher costs (inefficient
provision)
• Data on payments and outcomes not
unified or linked
• Complex remuneration and weak
regulation undermines accountability of
providers
• Contracting and
performance-based
contracting, often with
NGOs
• Performance-based
financing
Gaps:
• Overall purchasing
assessments and how to
defragment it and
improve its performance,
also working across
humanitarian and
development silos
• Development of context-
specific regulatory
models for different
sectors
Benefits
packages
Summary of common challenges in FCAS
settings
Strategies adopted to mitigate
these (and gaps)
Desirable features:
- Clarify the
population’s
entitlements and
obligations
- Improve population’s
awareness of their
legal entitlements
and obligations
- Align promised
benefits/
entitlements with
provider payment
mechanisms
• Entitlements unclear and not linked to
funding
• Population awareness of entitlements is low
• Healthcare packages may be missing or ill
defined → care seeking can be irrational
• Fragmented funding influences service
provision – e.g. vertical programmes can
give resourcing preference to some disease
areas
• Service provision capacity may be disrupted
(especially during acute crisis and when
boundaries shifting and contested), with
patchy coverage and low quality of care
• Parallel provision for refugees in many
settings and challenges transitioning away
from this
• Development and
implementation of essential
health care packages
Gaps:
• More work is needed on quality
of care in FCAS settings
• Dynamic costing of packages to
allow for changing contexts
UHC
objectives
• Resources captured; not flowing to populations with highest need
• Gaps in critical resources can make even limited resource inefficient (e.g. public budgets
often focussed on salaries, leaving lack of funds for drugs, outreach, supplies, supervision,
especially for frontline PHC services)
• Non-priority care can gain bulk of resources (e.g. prevention and lower cost, more
equitable services neglected)
• Governance and reporting weak: limited transparency and accountability, often
exacerbated by external dependence
UHC goals • Financial and non-financial barriers: inequitable access
• Under-consumption of care by poor and marginalised, exacerbated by physical access
barriers, especially with shifting populations & in slum areas
• Regressive financing of health care, especially when out of pocket payments predominate
• FCAS associated with lower financial protection in middle income countries
• Catastrophic payments, especially for chronic illness
• Quality of care often poorly regulated and low
Other
cross-
cutting
themes
• Weak public financial management systems contribute to many of the challenges above,
and are also themselves undermined by plethora of aid funding channels
• Health financing institutions have low capacity, which is hard to build in a context of
chronic or intermittent shocks
• Conflict and institutional weakness can block systemic reforms, although there is also some
evidence for windows of opportunity opening post-crisis (in some circumstances)
UHC coverage index
• Overall coverage for
essential health care (UHC
index for 2015) shows a
wide range of
performance (from around
20% for Somalia to >70%
in Uzbekistan)
• Differences between FCAS
and non-FCAS settings are
not significant for low
income countries
• However, for lower
middle income countries
(50% for FCAS, 59% for
non-FCAS) and upper
middle countries (58% for
FCAS, 68% for non-FCAS),
the differences are highly
significant
Good practices for external actors in FCAS
• Long-term commitments (financial and relational – e.g., limit turnover) and
consideration of long-term effects (including for humanitarian aid)
• Speed, flexibility and context-sensitivity
– best fit, not necessarily best practice
• Reinforce government stewardship and capacity
– avoid bad practices, e.g., triggering brain drain and distortion through per diems
• Alignment and harmonisation, including for humanitarian development nexus
• Service integration where possible
• Local level engagement, linking systems and communities
• Agile monitoring and evaluation in dynamic and data-limited contexts
• Working in a political economy-sensitive way
• Working across formal borders, as relevant (e.g. regional programmes)
• Support the opening / contribute to take advantage of windows of opportunity
• Preventing collapse
– through to supporting, strengthening, and sustainable systems, depending on
the circumstances
Comment on the literature
• High focus on some countries (e.g. Afghanistan); others neglected
• Equally lumpy on topics: aid coordination dominates, and some topics
such as purchasing, quality of care, provider regulation, resource
allocation, efficiency, and data and financial management systems are
either totally or relatively neglected
• Many studies are hampered by poor data quality, given the challenging
settings
• A significant proportion are conducted by designers and implementers of
health financing reforms and are therefore not independent
• Many are commissioned by external agencies and there is therefore likely
a neglect of smaller, local and more home-grown reforms
• The literature on FCAS also tends to be distinct from that on humanitarian
settings, mirroring organisational and funding differences
Areas for more research exploration
(cross-cutting topics)
• Equity analysis of health coverage in FCAS settings specifically
• Analysis through case studies of how health financing design and implementation
can convey social values and contribute to social resilience in FCAS settings
• Investigation of how to strengthen PFM and health financing data systems in
FCAS settings
• Analysis of successful experiences in bridging humanitarian and development
health financing modalities
• Analysis of the impact of health financing reforms on efficiency in FCAS
• Understanding and managing the political economy of health financing reforms in
FCAS settings
• Longitudinal studies of health financing institutional development and its
determinants in FCAS settings
Conclusions
• Heterogeneity of FCAS settings and need to focus on each context as unique, with its
particular challenges, opportunities and history
• Analysis shows variation in performance on health financing indicators (with some common
features)
– many FCAS countries share features with low income countries generally
– differences more obvious in MIC group?
• The WHO’s guiding principles for health financing reforms in support of UHC still apply in
FCAS settings
– in fact, even more so, given the greater severity of the challenges that they often face,
such as fragmentation, complexity and volatility of funds, for example.
• Although FCAS settings go through different phases, many face chronic problems and
complex emergencies, in which strategies for humanitarian response and development
converge.
– lessons on contracting health care provision and insurance models are just some
examples of areas where this convergence is occurring and can be further pursued. This
is important to managing transitions.
Policy areas to pursue
• Tailored domestic revenue generation strategies, including advocacy for prioritization
of social sector spending in middle-income FCAS
• Further pooling of donor support, including harmonizing financial management,
human resource and other procedures across donors, implementing agencies and
districts, including through shadow alignment where needed, in low income FCAS
• Focusing on strategies to improve quality and protect users in the formal and informal
sectors
• Tailored health sector assessments to understand causes of inefficiency and ways to
address these, including low budget absorption capacity
• More politically astute intervention,
– based on understanding the internal and external agency incentives,
– looking for politically feasible improvements, even where not optimal,
– enabling work across politically contested areas
• Being better prepared for crisis
– for example, having basic packages established and costed, so that governments and donors
can react quickly to shocks
– and having simple but functional systems for tracking expenditures and resource flows
References
Call, C.T., 2011. Beyond the ‘failed state’: Toward conceptual alternatives. Eur. J. Int. Relations 17, 303–326.
Graves, C.M., Haakenstad, A., Dieleman, J.L., 2015. Tracking development assistance for health to fragile states:
2005-2011. Global. Health 11, 1–7. Newbrander, W., Waldman, R.J., Shepherd-Banigan, M., 2011. Rebuilding
and strengthening health systems and providing basic health services in fragile states. Disasters 43, 639–660.
Kutzin, J., Witter, S., Jowett, M., Bayarsaikhan, D., 2017. Developing a national health financing strategy: a
reference guide. World Health Organization - Health Financing Guidance Series No 3, Geneva.
McIntyre, D., Kutzin, J., 2016. Health financing country diagnostic: a foundation for national strategy
development. World Health Organization, Geneva.
Mòdol, X., 2018. Health Financing Systems Challenges in the Context of Acute and Chronic Conflicts in EMR.
Cairo 30-31 May 2018.
Tikuisis, P., Carment, D., Samy, Y., Landry, J., 2015. Typology of State Types: Persistence and Transition. J. Int.
Interact. 41.
Wagner, Z., Heft-Neal, S., Bhutta, Z.A., Black, R.E., Burke, M., Bendavid, E., 2018. Armed conflict and child
mortality in Africa: a geospatial analysis. Lancet online.
Witter, S., 2012. Health financing in fragile and post-conflict states: What do we know and what are the gaps?
Soc. Sci. Med. 75, 2370–2377.
Witter, S., Bertone, B. et al. (2018) WHO Health Financing Working Paper (18.3): Health financing in fragile and
conflict-affected situations (in draft).
World Bank, 2018a. Fragility, Conflict and Violence overview. World Bank -
http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/fragilityconflictviolence/overview, Washington, DC.
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Health financing in fragile & conflict affected settings

  • 1. Health financing in fragile and conflict-affected states Insights from preparatory work for a WHO working paper Sophie Witter & Maria Bertone, IGHD/ReBUILD Research for stronger health systems post conflict
  • 2. Background • Two billion people now live in situations affected by fragility and conflict (World Bank 2018) • Share of extreme poor living in conflict-affected situations is expected to rise to almost 60% by 2030 • More than one third of maternal deaths occur in fragile states, and half of the children who die before age five live in FCAS (Newbrander et al., 2011) • A recent study found that armed conflict substantially and persistently increases infant mortality in Africa (Wagner et al., 2018) • However, fragile states receive around 50% less aid than predicted, despite their high needs (Graves et al., 2015) • In this context, making progress towards universal health coverage (UHC) and meeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is particularly challenging
  • 3. Rationale for work • Improving health financing systems is critical to enable countries to raise more resources for health and make good choices about how to use them. • Technical guidance products developed in recent years, including health financing diagnostic framework and guide to developing national HF strategies • However, the evidence of what works in these circumstances is limited. There is no clear guidance on how to translate and apply the existing lessons and principles on health financing for universal health coverage to fragile situations.
  • 4. Approach • Initial meeting in November 2017, including health financing staff from WHO Geneva, AFRO, EMRO; WHO health emergency programme and service delivery team; and external agencies (UHC 2030, P4H, World Bank, and ReBUILD) • In-depth consultation led by the WHO EMRO office in May 2018, focussed on health financing in chronic and acute emergencies. More than 30 participants attended, including WHO regional, head office and country level experts, representatives from other partners such as the Global Fund, Ministry of Health representatives from the region, academic experts and consultants • Literature review in which data from 168 published and grey documents were extracted, updating Witter 2012 • Limitations: non-systematic; varying quality and independent of studies • Paper in draft which also draws on experience of team
  • 6. What does being FCAS mean for the health sector? • Inability to provide health services to a large proportion of the population • Lack of equity in who receives the available health services • Ineffective or non-existent referral systems for the critically ill • A lack of infrastructure (including facilities, human resources, equipment and supplies, and medicines) for delivering health services • Non-operational health information systems for planning, management and disease surveillance • Lack of policy mechanisms for developing, establishing and implementing national health policies • Insufficient coordination, oversight and monitoring of health services by the emerging government, which may not have the capacity to manage • Inadequate management capacity and systems (such as budgeting, accounting and human resource management systems) for raising and controlling resources (Newbrander, Waldman, & Shepherd-Banigan 2011)
  • 7. UHC goals and intermediate objectives influenced by health financing policy Source: (Kutzin et al., 2017)
  • 8. Revenue raising and pooling Summary of common challenges in FCAS settings Strategies adopted to mitigate these (and gaps) Desirable features: - Increase flows from public and mandatory sources - Increase predictability and stability of funds - Enhance redistribution of prepaid funds - Ensure that funding sources are complementary - Reduce fragmentation, duplication and overlaps - Simplify financial flows • Low overall funding (though can in cases be high but poorly distributed) • Public funding is often low (low GDP growth; low taxation; non-prioritisation of social sectors) o May be multiple authorities collecting revenues o Limited territorial control reduces government revenue base • Conflict tends to depress health expenditure (2%/year, in one study), while raising needs (disrupted services, displaced populations, etc.) • High dependence on external funding (donors, charities, remittances). o Problems: instability; lack of predictability; and lack of alignment with public priorities (e.g. high volumes off-budget and off-plan) o External support is varied by country: donors preferred to provide more funding to low-income fragile countries that have refugees or on-going external interventions but tended to avoid providing funding to countries with political gridlock, flawed elections, or economic decline. o FCAS associated with higher external finance for MICs, not LICs (compared to non-FCAS LICs) • Aid pooling and coordination mechanisms, including shadow alignment • Policies to increase financial access and decrease out of pocket payments, including: user fee exemptions, health equity funds, health insurance, demand side financing • Greater use of cash, card- based and mobile payments in humanitarian settings
  • 9. Revenue raising and pooling Summary of common challenges in FCAS settings Strategies adopted to mitigate these (and gaps) o Assumption of decreasing financial dependency post-shock not well studied; dependency is also more than just financial o External finance can be too low for needs, while also being high relative to absorptive capacity (especially if there is a post-crisis funding influx), leading to low disbursement • High levels of out of pocket payments, in contexts where household incomes are often low and subject to shocks, with high levels of health need • Low trust undermines pooling – leads to lower levels of prepayment; more fragmented risk pools • Segmented population, especially where there are substantial refugee and displaced populations having varying protection Gaps: • More attention could be paid to domestic resource mobilisation, including from natural resources as well as remittances in some cases, but challenge is to increase tax equitably • Also need for continued, predictable and integrated external funding for LICs • How to harmonise/ integrate different strategies to increase access, including across humanitarian and development programmes, and during (uneven) transition away from aid
  • 10. Proportion of general government expenditure devoted to health, FCAS countries, 2014 Source: authors’ calculation based on (WHO, 2018) • Small but significant difference in government commitment to health, with FCAS countries as whole averaging 9% of government expenditure on health, compared to 12.5% for non-FCAS countries • This is largely driven by differences in middle- income countries
  • 11. Source: authors’ calculation based on (WHO, 2018) • Comparing out of pocket payments by income level, there is a significant difference between FCAS and non-FCAS countries in the low income group, with a mean of 43% out of pocket payments in the former, as against 31% for the latter. • However, for middle income groups, there is no significant difference between FCAS and non-FCAS countries, suggesting that they are either able to protect through continued pooling or only experience shorter term disruption. Out of pocket payments (% of current health expenditure), FCAS countries, 2014
  • 12. The dance of public financing and OOP… 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Iraq. Gov't and OOP (% THE). 2003-2015 Gov't OOP 2011-2013 Insurgency Double shock: ISIS + halving of oil prices Source: Global Health Expenditure Database (Modol, 2018) • Overall expenditure on health as a proportion of GDP ranged widely from less than 2% to 17% in 2014 for FCAS countries, with means of between 6-8%, depending on the income group. • There was no significant difference between FCAS and non-FCAS countries • However, internal composition changes over time – OOP increasing when public finances are affected by shocks, e.g. in Iraq
  • 13. Purchasing Summary of common challenges in FCAS settings Strategies adopted to mitigate these (and gaps) Desirable features: - Increase allocation of resources to providers linked to population health needs, information on performance, or a combination - Move away from either rigid, input-based line item budgets or completely unmanaged fee- for-service reimbursement - Manage expenditure growth - Move towards a unified data platform on patient activity • Multiple (uncoordinated and unaligned) purchasers, with households often dominant • Data on and assessment of population needs and provider performance is limited and often fragmented • Fee for service payment dominates in private, informal sectors; public sector commonly a mix of fixed (under-funded) budgets and user fees; various forms of contracting in humanitarian sector • Lack of confidence in government by donors → funding is often channelled to (I)NGOs, leading to patchy provision and often higher costs (inefficient provision) • Data on payments and outcomes not unified or linked • Complex remuneration and weak regulation undermines accountability of providers • Contracting and performance-based contracting, often with NGOs • Performance-based financing Gaps: • Overall purchasing assessments and how to defragment it and improve its performance, also working across humanitarian and development silos • Development of context- specific regulatory models for different sectors
  • 14. Benefits packages Summary of common challenges in FCAS settings Strategies adopted to mitigate these (and gaps) Desirable features: - Clarify the population’s entitlements and obligations - Improve population’s awareness of their legal entitlements and obligations - Align promised benefits/ entitlements with provider payment mechanisms • Entitlements unclear and not linked to funding • Population awareness of entitlements is low • Healthcare packages may be missing or ill defined → care seeking can be irrational • Fragmented funding influences service provision – e.g. vertical programmes can give resourcing preference to some disease areas • Service provision capacity may be disrupted (especially during acute crisis and when boundaries shifting and contested), with patchy coverage and low quality of care • Parallel provision for refugees in many settings and challenges transitioning away from this • Development and implementation of essential health care packages Gaps: • More work is needed on quality of care in FCAS settings • Dynamic costing of packages to allow for changing contexts
  • 15. UHC objectives • Resources captured; not flowing to populations with highest need • Gaps in critical resources can make even limited resource inefficient (e.g. public budgets often focussed on salaries, leaving lack of funds for drugs, outreach, supplies, supervision, especially for frontline PHC services) • Non-priority care can gain bulk of resources (e.g. prevention and lower cost, more equitable services neglected) • Governance and reporting weak: limited transparency and accountability, often exacerbated by external dependence UHC goals • Financial and non-financial barriers: inequitable access • Under-consumption of care by poor and marginalised, exacerbated by physical access barriers, especially with shifting populations & in slum areas • Regressive financing of health care, especially when out of pocket payments predominate • FCAS associated with lower financial protection in middle income countries • Catastrophic payments, especially for chronic illness • Quality of care often poorly regulated and low Other cross- cutting themes • Weak public financial management systems contribute to many of the challenges above, and are also themselves undermined by plethora of aid funding channels • Health financing institutions have low capacity, which is hard to build in a context of chronic or intermittent shocks • Conflict and institutional weakness can block systemic reforms, although there is also some evidence for windows of opportunity opening post-crisis (in some circumstances)
  • 16. UHC coverage index • Overall coverage for essential health care (UHC index for 2015) shows a wide range of performance (from around 20% for Somalia to >70% in Uzbekistan) • Differences between FCAS and non-FCAS settings are not significant for low income countries • However, for lower middle income countries (50% for FCAS, 59% for non-FCAS) and upper middle countries (58% for FCAS, 68% for non-FCAS), the differences are highly significant
  • 17. Good practices for external actors in FCAS • Long-term commitments (financial and relational – e.g., limit turnover) and consideration of long-term effects (including for humanitarian aid) • Speed, flexibility and context-sensitivity – best fit, not necessarily best practice • Reinforce government stewardship and capacity – avoid bad practices, e.g., triggering brain drain and distortion through per diems • Alignment and harmonisation, including for humanitarian development nexus • Service integration where possible • Local level engagement, linking systems and communities • Agile monitoring and evaluation in dynamic and data-limited contexts • Working in a political economy-sensitive way • Working across formal borders, as relevant (e.g. regional programmes) • Support the opening / contribute to take advantage of windows of opportunity • Preventing collapse – through to supporting, strengthening, and sustainable systems, depending on the circumstances
  • 18. Comment on the literature • High focus on some countries (e.g. Afghanistan); others neglected • Equally lumpy on topics: aid coordination dominates, and some topics such as purchasing, quality of care, provider regulation, resource allocation, efficiency, and data and financial management systems are either totally or relatively neglected • Many studies are hampered by poor data quality, given the challenging settings • A significant proportion are conducted by designers and implementers of health financing reforms and are therefore not independent • Many are commissioned by external agencies and there is therefore likely a neglect of smaller, local and more home-grown reforms • The literature on FCAS also tends to be distinct from that on humanitarian settings, mirroring organisational and funding differences
  • 19. Areas for more research exploration (cross-cutting topics) • Equity analysis of health coverage in FCAS settings specifically • Analysis through case studies of how health financing design and implementation can convey social values and contribute to social resilience in FCAS settings • Investigation of how to strengthen PFM and health financing data systems in FCAS settings • Analysis of successful experiences in bridging humanitarian and development health financing modalities • Analysis of the impact of health financing reforms on efficiency in FCAS • Understanding and managing the political economy of health financing reforms in FCAS settings • Longitudinal studies of health financing institutional development and its determinants in FCAS settings
  • 20. Conclusions • Heterogeneity of FCAS settings and need to focus on each context as unique, with its particular challenges, opportunities and history • Analysis shows variation in performance on health financing indicators (with some common features) – many FCAS countries share features with low income countries generally – differences more obvious in MIC group? • The WHO’s guiding principles for health financing reforms in support of UHC still apply in FCAS settings – in fact, even more so, given the greater severity of the challenges that they often face, such as fragmentation, complexity and volatility of funds, for example. • Although FCAS settings go through different phases, many face chronic problems and complex emergencies, in which strategies for humanitarian response and development converge. – lessons on contracting health care provision and insurance models are just some examples of areas where this convergence is occurring and can be further pursued. This is important to managing transitions.
  • 21. Policy areas to pursue • Tailored domestic revenue generation strategies, including advocacy for prioritization of social sector spending in middle-income FCAS • Further pooling of donor support, including harmonizing financial management, human resource and other procedures across donors, implementing agencies and districts, including through shadow alignment where needed, in low income FCAS • Focusing on strategies to improve quality and protect users in the formal and informal sectors • Tailored health sector assessments to understand causes of inefficiency and ways to address these, including low budget absorption capacity • More politically astute intervention, – based on understanding the internal and external agency incentives, – looking for politically feasible improvements, even where not optimal, – enabling work across politically contested areas • Being better prepared for crisis – for example, having basic packages established and costed, so that governments and donors can react quickly to shocks – and having simple but functional systems for tracking expenditures and resource flows
  • 22. References Call, C.T., 2011. Beyond the ‘failed state’: Toward conceptual alternatives. Eur. J. Int. Relations 17, 303–326. Graves, C.M., Haakenstad, A., Dieleman, J.L., 2015. Tracking development assistance for health to fragile states: 2005-2011. Global. Health 11, 1–7. Newbrander, W., Waldman, R.J., Shepherd-Banigan, M., 2011. Rebuilding and strengthening health systems and providing basic health services in fragile states. Disasters 43, 639–660. Kutzin, J., Witter, S., Jowett, M., Bayarsaikhan, D., 2017. Developing a national health financing strategy: a reference guide. World Health Organization - Health Financing Guidance Series No 3, Geneva. McIntyre, D., Kutzin, J., 2016. Health financing country diagnostic: a foundation for national strategy development. World Health Organization, Geneva. Mòdol, X., 2018. Health Financing Systems Challenges in the Context of Acute and Chronic Conflicts in EMR. Cairo 30-31 May 2018. Tikuisis, P., Carment, D., Samy, Y., Landry, J., 2015. Typology of State Types: Persistence and Transition. J. Int. Interact. 41. Wagner, Z., Heft-Neal, S., Bhutta, Z.A., Black, R.E., Burke, M., Bendavid, E., 2018. Armed conflict and child mortality in Africa: a geospatial analysis. Lancet online. Witter, S., 2012. Health financing in fragile and post-conflict states: What do we know and what are the gaps? Soc. Sci. Med. 75, 2370–2377. Witter, S., Bertone, B. et al. (2018) WHO Health Financing Working Paper (18.3): Health financing in fragile and conflict-affected situations (in draft). World Bank, 2018a. Fragility, Conflict and Violence overview. World Bank - http://www.worldbank.org/en/topic/fragilityconflictviolence/overview, Washington, DC.