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TTS Newsletter #5

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  1. 1. www.thethirdspace.com • Soho - 020 7439 6333 • Marylebone - 020 7042 6333 • sohoenquiries@thethirdspace.com • maryleboneenquiries@thethirdspace.com NO 5 FATLOSS KEEP SIMPLE SPRING INTOAUTUMN
  2. 2. INTRODUCTIONMatt Julian – Group Head of Fitness SPRING INTO AUTUMN This is the time of year when the days start getting shorter, the colours start changing, and of course the weather starts getting cooler… but that is no reason to start thinking of hibernation or planning to hide away! To assist you in resisting this temptation, we asked our fitness and medical teams to give their best bits of advice on staying active and healthy. Once again they have come back to us with a wide range of wisdom! As the weather starts getting cooler many of us naturally drop our water intake. Our Fitness Manager, Martyn Evans, tells us why this is a bad idea! Related to this, Dan tells us how to eat to ensure our energy levels stay high throughout the day, and Andrew suggests how we can give ourselves a chance to get a good night’s sleep. Scott gives us a reminder to keep the training programme fresh and new, and Andy gives us his way of ensuring your workout burns maximum fat. A lot of wisdom to absorb as the seasons start to change - but to kick things off, Laura gives us her advice on springing into autumn! When is the best time to set our fitness goals? Can we use seasonal approaches to these promises to ourselves or should we all wait until the New Year? I think setting seasonal training programmes can be highly motivating, invigorating and perhaps a smarter approach to setting goals in the first place and actually achieving them. Autumn is a great time to start goal setting and planning new training modalities. What a great idea to create positive habits for the up and coming holiday season and through the chilly winter months to follow! With the change of season comes a time to rethink and restart. What is so special about January anyway? Why not think of September as the New Year and get started? This year adhere to those promises you set yourself. Rather than TRYING to be in great shape, actively work towards BEING in great shape and way before you start rocking around the Christmas tree! Here are some ways to start making the most of the season. Take advantage of the weather. Wrap up and enjoy the crisp air – the sense of apple picking, pumpkin carving and the crunch of leaves underfoot. These months are an ideal time to exercise outdoors and enjoy cooler temperatures. Go for long walks and discover new scenery in our Royal Parks, challenge yourself with a spontaneous sprint up Primrose Hill or grab a ‘Boris’ bike for the afternoon and explore London city. This way you keep fitness fun. It does not have to seem like exercise to be a great workout! Think outside the box. Autumn is a great time to learn something new. We have a new timetable of classes at The Third Space that launches in September! See if something intrigues you and take a friend along too. It is the perfect time to gain new physical skills. Have you ever wondered what it was like to use the climbing wall at Soho or use the bars and ropes at Marylebone? Do not be afraid to open yourself up to learning something new. By next summer you will have mastered the skill! Rejuvenate yourself. This is a great time to rejuvenate body, mind and spirit. Get a deep tissue massage at spa@thethirdspace after your workout or a relaxing facial. Try a yoga or Pilates class. Treat yourself not just with exercise but other activities that promote wellness, feeling good physically, mentally and spiritually. Give yourself 30 days. It takes about 4 weeks for the body to adapt to lifestyle changes. That is why people who give up on their fitness programmes tend to do so within the first 30 days. So, when the alarm goes off in the morning and it is darker and colder, rather than rolling over and hitting the snooze button, get up, make yourself a brew and start the day with a positive thought. After a month, behaviour patterns will have adapted and it will be much easier to stick to it after that. Be committed and have consistency. It sounds so simple, right? Make a commitment (not an excuse) and be consistent with it. This will lead to a successful fitness programme but only if adhered to. Exercise takes commitment. When we prepare and plan our fitness programme just like everything else – like meetings, dinners, and getting kids to lessons and practice – things happen; they get done. Consistency is also an important component to consider. If you really want to avoid being disappointed year in year out make small attainable goals, ones you can stick to. If you are struggling to set these parameters for yourself then ask one of our personal trainers to help guide you through your goals and tailor your programme personally to you. Find your motivation. We are all motivated by different things. It is important to discover what your individual goals are whether fat loss, improving your strength, or preparing for a race or other event. But goals are not enough to get you there. We have to be motivated by the day-to- day routine. Choose something you will enjoy doing and be likely to keep up whether running through the park, working out with a trainer, or taking part in a gym class. Creating a challenge for yourself will directly motivate you, as will the encouragement you receive from a group class and one of our personal trainers. Be inspired and be inspirational. Lastly, remember that anything worth having takes work! SPRING INTOAUTUMNLaura Thomas – Marylebone PTI DO I DRINK ENOUGH? Martyn Evans – Fitness Manager For the majority of people, the answer to this question with regards to water consumption would be no. Depending on who you ask, between 50-65% of our bodies consist of water - in any language that is a large percentage! We in the UK are lucky enough to have access to clean, healthy water with the simple turn of a tap. Drinking enough water should be one of our easiest daily tasks. Yet it is fair to say that we waste more water in an average day than we actually drink. Many of our members embark on a regular exercise routine with the ultimate goal of looking better with the added assumption that by looking better they will also feel better. Exercise alone will not necessarily make a person “feel better”. The first question I ask when someone states a desire to feel better is: “how much water do you drink?” I genuinely believe that the quickest and easiest way in which to improve how we feel on a regular basis is to hydrate. I was chatting with a colleague recently and he said something that has stuck with me. He stated that “most of the population is over stimulated and under recovered”. He makes a very good point and based on various factors such as caffeine, alcohol, lack of sleep and unbalanced nutrition many people are functioning on a daily basis in a state of permanent dehydration and are often sustained by artificial stimulants. The positive effects of adequate water consumption are numerous, however the most obvious ones are that it is cheap, readily available, portable and, most importantly, it keeps us alive! Increasing your daily consumption will give you the fastest gains you will ever experience when it comes to “feeling better”. All of our body’s vital organs and systems rely on adequate water intake in order to function correctly. This fact alone should be motivation enough for us to continually hydrate. A very simple equation to follow in which to ensure you are drinking enough water depending on your body weight is: Body weight in kg x 0.033 = Water per day in litres eg. 86kg / 2 = 2.8 litres per day Depending on your physical activity level on a given day this may need to increase, however the above equation will give you a measurable goal to work towards in order to maintain healthy hydration levels. Go ahead, have a drink! Darius Knight, who plays for the GB Table Tennis team and is a member of The Third Space Soho, tells us how The Third Space has changed his view of training and could help him get better results in his sport. Darius started playing at the age of 10 as an after- school sport close to where he grew up in Battersea. But he had grown up as an all-round athlete, so what got him pursuing table tennis as a sport and career choice? In short, losing. Darius was used to excelling in sport and finding himself losing both frustrated and motivated him to learn to play table tennis. From humble beginnings, his local coach at the York Gardens Community Centre promised him that if he devoted himself to training he would be playing internationally within 18 months and that is exactly what happened. At 12, he had his first international match in Italy. At 13, the England team asked him to move to Nottingham to train in the Academy and by 15 he had become the European and World Champion. Darius went on to win a silver medal in the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi, India and was selected to play for GB in the 2012 Olympics. He is currently ranked No. 3 in the English Senior Rankings. When he started training at The Third Space Soho in January 2014, he admits that he had always struggled to work out at a gym, feeling bored very quickly... until he took part in one of Fitzroy Gaynes’ weight classes, that is. Usually training in the Academy, Darius was blown away by the results that he could see and feel after just one session and so Fitz instantly gained Darius’ respect as a personal trainer. Even in short episodes, as I am sure many of our lunchtime members can attest to, Fitz really gets his clients working hard. Gym sessions are now exciting and something to look forward to for Darius. Fitz has personalised Darius’ programme to improve his game. He focuses on building Darius’ upper body strength and balance, even working on concentration techniques. Overall this has helped Darius maintain his game and kept him winning even when he is not training to compete. Whereas before Darius thought of his playing getting him fit, Fitz has revealed that his getting fit is what can help him play. At the Academy Darius trains with his teammates but he now recognises the need to train individually as well. He has a new-found mental strength and has picked up skills that give him an edge against his opponents. Darius has recently launched his own equipment range of tables and bats, available at www.dariusknight.com. He is also an Athlete Mentor for SKY Sports Youth Trust “Living for Sports” programme, which involves him encouraging children to take part in sports in schools. Over the next 12 months, Darius has his sights set on being England’s No. 1. He is hoping to compete in the World Championships, the European Olympics and the 2015 Commonwealth Championships. We look forward to hearing of his success! THE Third Space members receive a 10% discount. Simply show your membership card to a member of staff. Open all day for breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner. 6.30am to 11pm Monday to Friday, from 7am on Saturdays and Sundays. To book call 020 7969 3900 or visit us via The Pantry’s entrance on Bulstrode Street. Our sister restaurant 108 Bar & Grill will be closed for a full refurbishment for two weeks in September and will open again on Monday, 22 September with new menus, décor and style. Open all day, the Pantry has quickly become a local favourite and in March introduced its Juicery menu made up of healthy, fresh juices and smoothies. Celebrated by health and fitness fans alike, recipes are created with the help of experts in the field of nutrition and integrative medicine to answer all your daily healthy food needs. Just a two-minute walk from The Third Space’s Marylebone Club, The Pantry at 108 is The Marylebone Hotel’s newest dining destination. The bright, modern space, accessed via its own entrance on Bulstrode Street, offers a menu featuring healthy and classic dishes. Come and sample the delicious gluten-free afternoon tea or simply indulge in the Pantry’s seasonally changing selection of dishes and home-made cakes. 108marylebonelane.co.uk@108Marylebone /108MaryleboneLane SUPER FOOD GET FIT TO PLAY, NOTPLAYTOGETFITDarius Knight – GB Table Tennis Team 32
  3. 3. BREITLING.COM WELCOME TO OUR WORLD SUPER AVENGER II At the heart of the most extreme missions are the exceptional pilots who experience daring feats on a daily basis and are prepared to entrust their security only to the most high-performing instruments. At the heart of the most extreme missions is the Breitling Avenger. A concentrated blend of power, precision and functionality, Avenger models boast an ultra-sturdy construction and water resistance ranging from 300 to 3,000 meters. These authentic instruments for professionals are equipped with selfwinding movements chronometer- certified by the COSC – the highest official benchmark in terms of reliability and precision. Welcome to the sphere of extremes. Welcome to the Breitling world. For your nearest stockist in Great Britain and Ireland telephone 020 7518 7010 KEEPING ENERGY LEVELSUPDan Meek – Marylebone PTI Do you ever get that feeling where you eat breakfast and then get tired or lethargic by 10 am or 11 am? And then again after lunch at 3 pm or 4 pm? It makes you feel like you are running low on energy and that your days are so tiring. Everyone has experienced that feeling before where they eat a large meal and then feel lethargic and just want to sleep (think Christmas day). But breakfast and lunch are never really large meals. So why does this happen? Maybe it is not about the volume of food you are eating but the macronutrient content of the food. I bet you think it is a blood sugar crash or that your morning caffeine is wearing off. It is much more likely to be due to the protein content of the meals you are eating. Yes, I said protein. When you eat a meal that contains mainly carbohydrate with small amounts of protein (<10g) your body produces a hormone called “serotonin”. This leads to feelings of relaxation, lethargy and results in reduced performance and reduced mental alertness. Now it is not as simple as saying carbohydrates make you sleepy - there are many processes that occur leading to serotonin production. The main process is how your meal composition affects free amino acid content in the body. To have a positive impact here, all we need to do is add some protein (>30g) to those meals that are high in carbohydrates, and due to the processes mentioned earlier, serotonin production is reduced and catecholamine hormone levels rise. Simply put, having this mixed meal of protein and carbohydrate will help to reduce those feelings of lethargy and lead to better concentration, alertness and productivity. So what does this mean in practice? How can this information help you? Well, if you have a bowl of cereal or rounds of toast in the morning a great way to increase the protein intake of that meal is to have a whey protein shake with it, or, better still, ditch the processed food and go for a bowl of porridge with nuts and honey sprinkled on top along with your whey protein shake. If you enjoy your toast in the morning and cannot live without it, then have 3-4 soft boiled eggs on the side or, even better, skip the jam and have poached eggs on your toast. One of the best breakfasts you can have is a mixed veg ommelette with plenty of chicken and ham on WHAT AM I ACHIEVING?Scott Phillips – Marylebone PTI So with the season changing from summer to autumn, does that mean you should change your workout plan and nutrition? In short, not really! Most people change their exercise for a more aesthetic approach, for example, that ‘beach body’ in the summer and then dial it down for winter. Bodybuilders go through a ‘bulking’ and ‘cutting’ phase pre-competition much the same as boxers train for a fight. So why do most people – and mostly guys – follow the same regimens when they have no intention of competing? It is easier to be strict for a short period of time or for a particular goal than it is for an extended period of time and when I say strict I am talking about both training and eating. The former requires effort and the latter discipline and, of course, both factors require consistency. To me there are two types of person in the gym: the one who comes to exercise and the other who comes to train. What is the difference? Exercise to me is basically just moving. 30 minutes of cardio that you do followed by some machine weights, sticking to that 2 year old programme a trainer gave you that was designed to get you started. You do it, in essence, because it is easy. You work up a little sweat and you leave feeling pretty good but ultimately not really changing anything! Training, on the other hand, is coming to the gym and leaving your comfort zone at the door. You understand that in order to change you need to become comfortable with uncomfortable. You work hard at whatever programme you are currently working through and leave the gym with nothing left to give, knowing you achieved something. This includes a nutritional plan that compliments your goals and enables you to push yourself in the workouts and repair efficiently for the next time. Your nutrition should be consistent. The term diet implies your current nutritional habits have an expiry date. That is why most of them do not work long term. A diet is usually based on negative energy balance, which is less calories going in than you are burning off, inevitably leading to overall weight loss. When you have achieved the weight you want you will come off the ‘diet’ and return to the eating habits that got you in to the shape you did not want. This is known as a positive energy balance, when you have more calories going in than going out and you gain weight. A nutritional plan is often based on neutral energy balance which is, as you guessed it, an equal calorie-in calorie-out. We come to a gym to be fit, healthy and look good but in addition to looking good our bodies need to function properly. Without challenges our bodies tend to stagnate. They become lazy and adapt to our set daily routines and pretty soon all we are fit to do is what we do day in and day out. Injuries occur out of the most mundane actions born from a lack of strength and the repetitive nature of our lives. Our nutrition becomes about how we feel emotionally and not what our bodies require and let us not forget our food is literally what we are made of... Just let that sink in for a second. So you are probably thinking of what you can do now. You have a couple of options but the most logical is to go to someone who knows what they are doing. As a personal trainer I strive to educate. There is so much misinformation available that it is sometimes hard to see the wood for the trees. So why not seek out someone who could clear the mess, explain the jargon and point you in the right direction? An hour of the gym is 4% of your day. Make sure it is used in the right way. top, and a couple of pieces of fruit on the side mixed into a natural yogurt that is high in probiotics. Increasing your protein intake will not turn you into a muscle bound bodybuilder, but instead will help you lose body fat, keep you feeling fuller for longer and more importantly help stabilise your energy levels throughout the day. Leaving you feeling younger, more vibrant and more likely to achieve your goals. SLEEPFOR HEALTH Andrew Johnston (Mbone PTI) Healthful sleep has been proven to be the single most important factor in predicting longevity: more influential than diet, exercise, or hereditary factors. But how much sleep is needed in today’s society? The National Sleep Foundation recommends that adults should aim for between 7-9 hours sleep per night for the average population. However, reality speaks differently. The population of the UK stand with around 18% of people having reported sleeping less than 6 hours a night, and 27% saying they rarely get a good night’s sleep during the work week. This makes the average population figures coming out lower than ideal, with 6-7 hours as the current population average. This lack of sleep can be the first of many steps to psychological issues such as increased stress levels, and increased chance of depression, insomnia, and anxiety. These issues can obviously be very detrimental and lead to numerous more problems if not addressed and dealt with. Luckily one of the solutions to this problem is readily available – exercise! Weight lifting exercises have been proven to improve sleep quality, decrease the chance of depression, and increase strength and quality of life without significantly changing habitual activities. This is a very easy solution to increasing sleep quality and general quality of life to help you feel young and fresh again. This type of solution was also found in many treatments of patients with sleeping disorders. There are many other proven methods that can be used to help improve sleep quality such as music. Multiple studies have shown that music, such as relaxing classical music, is an effective intervention in reducing sleeping problems. This can be any form of music that is soothing and relaxing, and results have been seen with population groups ranging from older adults through to students. Music therapy has helped them feel revitalised and be able to concentrate more throughout the day. So it can be said that exercise of any level will assist in quality of sleep. Higher quality of sleep can in turn increase home comfort, and work and gym efficiency, helping to balance all the different spaces of our life. 4
  4. 4. Instead of waiting until next summer to start thinking about your fat loss training, I thought this was as good a time as any to put my own little spin on training for fat loss! Firstly, you have to get your diet right. My main rules in eating for fat loss are: 01. Eat protein in all meals, 3 times a day. 02. Eat fats (avocados, oils, fish, seeds, etc.) in every meal. 03. Eat plenty of green veggies, especially cruciferous vegetables. 04. Eat more carbohydrates on training days and less on rest days. 05. Only drink green tea and water. So when it comes to training and fat loss, muscle tissue is your best friend because it is metabolically active, i.e. it needs lots of energy. So training for gaining or maintaining muscle should always be your number one goal regardless of whether you are male or female. So carry out your strength session as you would do normally: 5 reps x 5 sets or 8 reps x 3 sets with lots of big lifts, squats, deadlifts and chin-ups. Make sure that you vary your rep range every 4 to 6 weeks and switch the exercises to make sure you shock the body. Then end the session with one of the short workouts I have listed below as a bolt-on to finish. 30/20/10 Kettlebell Swings and Press-ups This combination is popular because it only requires a kettlebell so you can do it almost anywhere. You do need to know good kettle bell swing technique for this one and for a more advanced work-out you can replace press-ups with clap press-ups. How to do it: Start with as many kettlebell swings as possible in 30 seconds. Rest for 30 seconds. Then do as many press-ups (or clap press-ups) as possible in 30 seconds. Rest for 30 seconds. Next do swings hard and fast for 20 seconds. Rest for 20 seconds. Follow it up with 20 seconds of press-ups (or clap press-ups). Rest for 20 seconds. Finish with 10 seconds of swings. Rest for 10 seconds. 10 seconds of press-ups (or clap press-ups). Rest for 30 seconds and repeat the sequence once more. 5 Minute Squat, Curl and Push Press This challenging complex can be performed with a kettlebell or a dumbbell in each hand. It is an ideal finisher for people that are short on time and do not have a lot of space to move, but it is also great for everyone else that wants to burn fat and build their anaerobic threshold. How to do it: Stand with feet shoulder-width apart while holding a weight in each hand, arms hanging at your sides. Push the hips back and squat until the weights are just below the knees. Quickly stand up as you simultaneously curl the weights and then dip down a few inches and push-press the weights overhead using leg assistance. This entire movement should be smooth without any hesitation. Bust off as many hard and fast continuous reps as possible in 2 minutes. Rest for 60 seconds and repeat. 5 Minute Leg Press Challenge This is the simplest of the lot but obviously it works best on lower body days. The trickiest part is getting the weight correct. 100+kg for men, 60+kg for women. 2 minutes continued pressing, maintaining controlled range never locking out your knees and without stopping. You can go partial range for brief moments of the 2 minutes but only as active recovery. Rest for 60 seconds and then repeat the effort. 150 Band Squat Jump, Push-up Combo The band jump squat and push-up is an awesome combination, but it becomes pretty brutal when you have to knock out 150 total reps as fast as possible. Band squat jumps – the problem with regular squat jumps (vertical jumps) is that on landing often knees will buckle inwards. To counter this, grab a small band or physio tubing. Put this around your knees and when you perform your squat jumps continuously push outwards against the band. Having the band next to your knees gives you greater sensory awareness of what your knees are doing making it much easier to maintain knee tracking. How to do it: Start with 15 band-jump squats, then drop to the ground (keep the band on) and do 15 push-ups. The next round is 14 of each. Continue dropping a rep each round until you reach 10. Absolutely no resting until you have finished all 150. If you are struggling with the press-ups, drop to your knees when you cannot maintain form. Just don’t stop. With this bolt-on to your training, prepare to turn up your fat burning! What is the point? The intense combination of exercises that stimulates all the major muscle groups to induce the highest metabolic cost possible. Basically, it is the longest 5 or 10 minutes of your life, and it should be performed at the end of your strength workout. This is because your available energy stores are lower than normal after a strength training session. This depletion creates the ideal time to augment the demand for energy since your metabolism will trigger hormone-sensitive lipase in adipocytes in order to provide this energy. In essence, you can stimulate a lot of fat burning at the end of a workout. Warning! If you do this correctly you will not want to do anything afterwards. It should be exhausting up to the edge of nausea, and you can take pride in the fact that you stoked your fat-burning capacity. REBECCA HOSSACKART The Third Space and Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery have been in collaboration for some time offering fitness-goers the opportunity to exercise and unwind alongside fabulous art. A recent re-launch sees the work of Claire Milner adorn the walls at Marylebone. Described as metaphors of our time, Milner’s collection investigates endangered species through a mix of media. Her crystal animals are set against a painted background on which she explores the reasons for their threatened status. Here, Milner makes her point through words, or something as simple as a human handprint. Look out for the gorilla in the men’s changing room. At Soho, Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery’s eclectic mixed show is currently on display. Artists available for viewing include Piers Bourke, whose work combines photographic images with three- dimensional structures, offering thought-provoking re-interpretations of reality by manipulating form and space. Also on display is print-maker Phil Shaw who, like Bourke, plays with our perception of the everyday. His acclaimed ‘Bookshelf’ series sees books on shelves whose titles have melted together, taking digital printmaking into a new age. Innovation is also a hallmark of Laura Jordan’s canvases on show at Soho. Depicting cityscapes from across the globe through a range of materials, Jordan follows the satirical traditions of Hogarth by charting the political and social character of contemporary urbanity. Finally, not to be missed are Robert Bradford’s dog sculptures. Crafting their three-dimensional forms from discarded children’s toys, Bradford works with materials that he feels are loaded with history and use. He regards theses colourful building blocks as mini sculptures in their own right. As the viewer explores the individual toys forming each dog, they are invited to travel back into the past, as both childrearing and childhood memories are awakened. KEEP FATLOSSSIMPLEAndy Vincent – Soho PTI THE BACK SQUAT BACKGROUND The squat pattern is a very natural human movement pattern. Not being able to perform the squat pattern effectively can lead to injury, muscular and skeletal imbalances later on in life. The back squat is one exercise that, if done properly and regularly, lays down a strong foundation for most other exercises to be done effectively. Being strong in a squat movement will lead to improvements in: „„ strength, „„ fat loss, „„ endurance & cardiovascular training, „„ injury prevention, and „„ muscle building training. The back squat is a more hip dominant exercise than the front and goblet squat. It exercises the whole of the lower body. The quadriceps, Gluteal group, hamstrings, and hip flexors are the main muscle groups being used. The upper body is also involved heavily, and being able squat effectively requires a strong posterior core and a strong upper back. Both these areas are exercised throughout the squat movement as they both keep the spine in a neutral position. „„ If you spend most of your day sat down, more than likely your hips flexors are going to be very tight. This will make squatting to an effective depth hard work. „„ The spiderman lunge and pigeon pose are a good mobility drills to help open up your hips. Hold each stretch for 30 seconds on each leg x 2 sets. THE START POSITION „„ Head up. „„ Chest out. „„ Shoulder blades pulled back. Feet shoulder width apart. „„ Feet pointed outwards. „„ Bar on upper shoulders. Bar held in overgrasp claw grip. „„ Elbows bent 90 degrees. THE DESCENT „„ Breathe in and hold your breath. „„ Tighten lower back and bend legs keeping your torso upright. Keep feet flat on the floor. „„ Bend legs until top of thighs break parallel to the floor. „„ Maintain a straight back (Lordotic curve). BOTTOM POSITION „„ Head up. „„ Chest out. „„ Straight back (Lordotic curve evident). „„ Knees point out along line of big toe. „„ Knees go past the toes. THE ASCENT „„ Lead with the chest. „„ Drive upwards by extending the hips and knees. „„ Keep torso upright and maintain a straight back. „„ Stand up explosively. „„ Breathe out as an erect stance is achieved. 1.1 Rounded lower back at the bottom of the squat will cause lower back injury. 1.2 This is caused by weak abdominals and lower back muscles, and lack of flexibility in ankle, hips or upper body. 1.3 Weight is too heavy and needs to be reduced until correct technique is executed. 2.1 Incorrect knee alignment, too much internal rotation. This can cause injury and pain at knees. 2.1 This is caused by poor mobility at the ankles and/or weak hip adductors or extensors (glutes). 2.1 Weight needs to be distributed to the heels and outside of the feet to correct technique. 2.1 Weight may need to be reduced until correct technique is performed. STEP 1: IMPROVING MOBILITY & WARMING UP STEP 2: CORRECT TECHNIQUE COMMON MISTAKES Being able to squat so your thighs are parallel with the floor, or hips below the knees requires good flexibility in your ankles, hips and upper body. So doing the squat through a large range of motion with help with flexibility, which will help prevent any injuries. „„ Stand with the foot a few inches away from the wall and flex the ankle so the heel stays in contact with the floor and the knee touches the wall. „„ Rock the ankle back and forth, not holding the stretch. „„ Do this 10-15 times on each foot. ANKLE SELF-MOBILISATION HIP MOBILISATION 1. SPIDERMAN LUNGE PIGEON POSE THE ASCENT BOTTOM POSITION START POSITION 2. 6 7
  5. 5. SOHO Mon – Fri: 6.30 – 23.00 Sat – Sun : 8.30 – 20.30 MARYLEBONE Mon – Fri: 6.30 – 23.00 Sat – Sun : 8.00 – 20.00 THE THIRD SPACE MEDICINE Mon – Fri: 7.30 – 20.30 Sat – Sun: Closed THE THIRD SPACE PILATES Mon – Fri: 7.30 – 20.30 Sat: 9.00 – 17.00 Sun: Closed SPA@THETHIRDSPACE Please see website for opening hours SOHO 020 7439 6333 sohoenquiries@thethirdspace.com www.thethirdspace.com MARYLEBONE 020 7042 6333 maryleboneenquiries@thethirdspace.com Marylebone Bulstrode Place Marylebone Lane London W1U 2HU Soho 67 Brewer Street London W1F 9US MOVEMENT COURSE AT THE THIRD SPACE 2014 has been a big year for improvement at The Third Space. Now that the extensive upgrades to our Soho Club are complete we would like to announce an exciting development within our education department. We have always regarded ourselves as leaders in the fitness industry and to this end we have decided to make our in-house education programme available to anyone with a passion for improving their understanding of how our bodies move. For the last 2 years all personal trainers at The Third Space have taken part in our 2 day in-house programme which covers the practical applications of kinesiology, biomechanics and correct coaching techniques. By making this course available to all health and fitness professionals and, indeed, exercise and anatomy enthusiasts who do not work in the fitness industry we are affording ourselves the opportunity to directly influence the quality of instruction being delivered in UK and hopefully have a hand in the direction in which our industry is going. The course is heavily focused on being able to identify and define what movement is occurring at which joint and to then develop a thought process as to whether or not that movement is appropriate for the client. Once this is determined the appropriate exercises can then be selected based on that client’s unique movement pattern as opposed to a generic one-shoe-fits-all approach to exercise prescription. By combining the mechanics of movement with the latest research on coaching and exercise prescription our 2 day course will deliver an eye-opening insight, particularly to those who have been thinking about training from a ‘muscle-first’ and ‘body-part’ thought process. The Third Space has seen the benefits of our trainers having the ability to look at movement in this way and are excited to now be able share it with trainers, therapist, coaches and enthusiasts everywhere. The next ‘Movement’ course will be held on 27 and 28 September 2014 from 10 am – 5 pm in the studio at TTS Soho. The course fee is £500 for the 2 days. For information on enrolment please contact camelia.ghigea@thethirdspace.com. SOHO CLUB –NEW ENTRANCE AND MOVE TOBREWER STREET On 14 July 2014 the Soho Club moved into its magnificent new reception on Brewer Street. At the same time the Medical Centre and main studio relocated to the first floor of Brewer Street. The areas have been well received by members and we are delighted with the improvements that the new facilities make to the Club. Energy flows through the new open layout into all areas and the new reception desk means that we can give an even warmer welcome to our members. This represents the end of Phase 1 of the Soho works. Phase 2 will be the unveiling of the new ceiling and lighting feature above the glass floor which will be in October 2014. Phase 3 will be the addition of a new, even larger studio overlooking the glass floor which is scheduled for Autumn 2015. We immensely appreciate the patience shown by all our members and medical clientele during Phase 1 and are delighted to be able to confirm that Phases 2 and 3 should cause minimal member disruption – and definitely no more complete Club closures.

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