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Intern takeaways 2018

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Intern takeaways 2018

  1. 1. INTERN TAKEAWAYS 2018
  2. 2. PROJECT MANAGEMENT • Always double-check, triple-check, and check again. (And then get someone else to help check over - just in case) There is always something you might have missed due to creative fatigue or oversight. When in doubt, (and have time for proofing) - it always help to have several pairs of eyes and recheck work. • Always respond in a timely manner or at least send email confirmation of reception. Projects moves quick- ly, and if there is a bottleneck in process, then that means time will be taken from someone else’s time. As such, we need to move things as quickly, and as orderly as possible. Gen- eral rule, confirm reception so the sender knows you have received the email. Skimp email, and prioritized it accordingly, and then should response at least within 1 hour of reception. • Always read through the message, and then smooth communication. Project managers doesn’t just manage the project health and progress. We are also the one who works closely with third party, developers, creatives and sometimes clients. There are times where we are to answer or relay comments, technical/creative decisions, etc. We can NOT just past along the message. We have to read the mes- sage, break it down to easy-to-understand forms or edit the comments (if needed) before passing them along. It’s import- ant as keeping a comfortable atmosphere and communica- tion channel between the different groups. • Always use old emails or check for any references available. In my experience, if you are cc’d on anything or if there are references on server - use them. They will help you figure out things quickly and/or cut down lots of back and forth or obvious questions. It shows others that you take initiative and a fast/smart learner.
  3. 3. PROJECT MANAGEMENT • Understanding your teammates working styles and personalities will lead to smoother communication and workflow • Take a day by day approach when communicat- ing deadlines, and then zoom out and give a look into the week. Quick hits are best to get the team all on the same page. • Project Management is all about building rela- tionships. Understanding where and why teammates are coming from will help you manage the project more smoothly. • Don’t kick off a job without a brief. No matter what account/client service says. Make sure there is some sort of documentation for the project and that you have funds to cover it. CLIENT SERVICES • Build a relationship with the client ASAP, this makes ALL the work easier • Be proactive, be one step ahead of the client • Always manage client expectations. Tell them what they are going to see, how they are going to see it, ensure it aligns with what they expect. No unexpected surprises (unless they are good ones like extra ideas or happy hour or great food for lunch) • Over communicate. Client service has the most con- tact w/ clients. Ensure your Sandbox teams know what you know and when you know it (as soon as possible). Help them feel connected to the client.
  4. 4. CLIENT SERVICES • Build relationships. You can NEVER know your client too well. Dinners and lunches and drinks w/ clients are for you to hear what is happening at work and in their personal lives -- so you can help. If you don’t know about them, you can’t get to the underlying opportunities. In addition, the more you know some- one, the more they know you - trust starts here. If they trust you, you can have more honest discussions about how to help them. • Pick up the phone and get in the room. Do not hide behind email or text. They have their place but face to face and voice to voice are always preferred when having a discussion with any client - when it’s possible make it happen. • Bring your team to the table. Collaboration is key. If your internal teams also know your clients well, you’re all on the same page with who they are and what they need. Also makes collabo- ration easier when you engage on projects. • Always ask for more time if you need it. Better to push a meeting...than have a bad meeting. It’s hard to rebound from a bad meeting, but if you ask for more time and kill it...they’ll forget about the time extension. :) SCREEN MEDIA • When you can, show two or three different ver- sions of something. This helps communicate with cli- ents and directors who suddenly have multiple visual aids to get their point across. • Always think about how you can elevate the work. Maybe provide a “safe” option that checks all of the boxes, then make another one that goes a little further. • Always be learning. Learn new techniques and soft- ware. Take time every day to tap into what is going on in the video and motion graphics community. You’ll be seen as taking initiative for offering new solutions to problems.
  5. 5. CREATIVE • Intellectual curiosity—”fortune favors the prepared mind”...learn as much as you can about as many disciplines as you can (art, architecture, history, literature, music, film, dance, theatre, math, science, technology, etc.). You don’t need to be an expert in each, just enough to trigger deeper research if necessary (you don’t need to know much about anything, just a little bit about everything!). • Keep a sketchbook—It’s always good to have your thumb- nail concepts and sketches in a central location that are readily available. Any unused ideas for one project may workout for another months or even years down the line. • Time management—You rarely get one project at a time to work on for a month, uninterrupted. Prioritize things based on due dates and how many others it will effect down the line (i.e. a video on a 2-week timeline will require you to complete the storyboard before you would layout a 2-sided sell sheet due in a week because it will affect many more people to deliver the final product). • Manage project timelines before diving in. Review your projects and their timelines before starting your day. Always prioritize work that is due sooner OR something that will take less effort/time to complete so you can focus more on the bigger projects. Balancing work enables you to be more efficient with the quality of work and meeting deadlines. • Do a little research on your project prior to jumping into creative mode. Try to have a good understanding on your task and objective first. Research what’s been done out there in the market and see how others executed similar tasks. This will enable you to understand the problem and come up with better solutions once you’re ready to design.
  6. 6. • Optimize your LinkedIn page - Recruiters use key- words on LinkedIn to search for qualified candidates. Identify what your keywords are and glitter your page with them. • Connect with EVERYONE on LinkedIn - Every time you become a 1st degree connection with someone, you become a 2nd degree connection to everyone they know. • Buffer time is your friend. If possible, put in some buf- fer time in your schedule. Then tell creatives the due date 1-.05 day earlier than it is. When not possible, just ask for the creative 0.5 day earlier. This way if there are any issues, delay, or more feedback then expected - you will have some wiggle room. • No drama. Try to be as friendly and drama-free as pos- sible. In all types of work, it’s worth to keep good rela- tions with everyone. In other words, do not piss off people you have to work with. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a firm hand if they are out of line. Just avoid unnecessary drama for everyone’s stress level sake. • Caffeine is everyone’s friend. (and it also doesn’t hurt to show your appreciation to others) Happy workers are ones who get caffeinated and kept caffeinat- ed. If possible, randomly provide a good cup of joe to your teammates will be appreciated. You don’t have to go out of the way to buy coffee - but a simple thank you or small gesture of appreciation will go a long way too. Yes, people are paid to do their work. But people will do better work if they know they are getting acknowledged and appreciated. (preferably with good coffee - for my office)
  7. 7. • Follow the advice of idealists, shun the advice of realists - a realist will tell you what you will be, an idealist will tell you what you could be. • Offer to help. But relax when you can too. If you have free time, ask others if you can help. It will win you brownie points, and also get you exposure to work outside of your projects. If you have free time, and no one needs help -- relax and enjoy the rare down time you have. Given that our projects comes in waves, sometimes it’s nice to just relax ourselves so we can have the mental power for the next wave. • Take your work seriously but also keep in mind that it’s just work, there are far more important things in life than work • Learn the roles and responsibilities of everyone that you work with...if you take the time to understand what your co-workers do on a daily basis, it will help you to empathize with the people on your team, which in turn, allows you to deliver a better product (do unto others...) • If the option is there, talk in person! • Get to know teammates on a personal level. • Live day to day, and don’t let the stress of tomorrow weigh you down. • Keep learning by continually asking why and ask lots of questions. • It’s ok to have a personal life and leave work at the office. GENERAL WORK ADVICE
  8. 8. GENERAL WORK ADVICE • Those dumb classmates that you had to do projects with will eventually be dumb co-work- ers that you’ll have to do projects with - get used to it and figure out how to deal with them. • Try to explore around the office and talk to other people outside of your department more. Break your day-to-day routine once in a while to expand your relationships by walking around and talk to your colleagues. Find out what’s going on around your environ- ment. • Always better to over communicate to a certain extent than keeping things to yourself. It’s com- mon that people will get busy and overlook some small details, so it’s always good to communicate project status, always ask questions if you’re confused about something, and keep your team informed about any issues or con- cerns way before the project is due. The more the team knows, less issues will occur in the long run.
  9. 9. • Designing Disney: Imagineering and the Art of the Show, by Peggy Van Pelt and John Hench • Creative Boot Camp: Generating Ideas in Greater Quantity and Quality, by Stefan Mumaw • Marketing Aesthetics: The Strategic Management of Brands, Identity, and Image, by Alex Simonson and Bernd Schmitt • Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Princi- ples of Screenwriting, by Robert McKee • • Save the cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need, by Blake Snyder • Steal like an Artist by Austin Kleon • Damn Good Advice (For People with Talent!): How To Unleash Your Creative Potential by America’s Master Communicator, by George Lois • The Art of Client Service by Robert Solomon

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