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New Networking Capabilities In ACS And How To Leverage Them For VNF Deployments

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New Networking Capabilities In ACS And How To Leverage Them For VNF Deployments

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Several new networking capabilities such as IPv6 support, fully routed Virtual Router, user-driven shared networks and others have been added to CloudStack since its 4.17 release. In this talk, Alex looks at how to use these new capabilities together in order to seamlessly enable the deployment of Virtual Network Functions via ACS.

Alexandre Mattioli is a highly experienced Infrastructure Architect who has been working with Apache Cloudstack since 2015, he has designed, built and operated one of the largest ACS clouds in existence and led a team to design and productise many diverse solutions on top of ACS. He's currently a Cloud Architect at ShapeBlue.

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CloudStack Collaboration Conference 2022 took place on 14th-16th November in Sofia, Bulgaria and virtually. The day saw a hybrid get-together of the global CloudStack community hosting 370 attendees. The event hosted 43 sessions from leading CloudStack experts, users and skilful engineers from the open-source world, which included: technical talks, user stories, new features and integrations presentations and more.

Several new networking capabilities such as IPv6 support, fully routed Virtual Router, user-driven shared networks and others have been added to CloudStack since its 4.17 release. In this talk, Alex looks at how to use these new capabilities together in order to seamlessly enable the deployment of Virtual Network Functions via ACS.

Alexandre Mattioli is a highly experienced Infrastructure Architect who has been working with Apache Cloudstack since 2015, he has designed, built and operated one of the largest ACS clouds in existence and led a team to design and productise many diverse solutions on top of ACS. He's currently a Cloud Architect at ShapeBlue.

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CloudStack Collaboration Conference 2022 took place on 14th-16th November in Sofia, Bulgaria and virtually. The day saw a hybrid get-together of the global CloudStack community hosting 370 attendees. The event hosted 43 sessions from leading CloudStack experts, users and skilful engineers from the open-source world, which included: technical talks, user stories, new features and integrations presentations and more.

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New Networking Capabilities In ACS And How To Leverage Them For VNF Deployments

  1. 1. New networking capabilities in ACS – and how to leverage them for VNF deployments Alexandre Mattioli - Cloud Architect, ShapeBlue CloudStack Collaboration Conference 2022
  2. 2. Who’s talking? Alexandre Mattioli - Cloud Architect at Shapeblue • Brazilian, now based in Prague • 30 years experience in Technology • Worked in many fields of IT • Involved with CloudStack since 2012 • @ShapeBlue since 2020.
  3. 3. What will we talk about? • What are VNFs • Historical challenges with VNFs in CloudStack • Past enhancements • Current state of ACS’s networking (4.17) • The future in ACS networking (4.18+) • Q&A Related talks on CCC 2022: Wei-Zhou: VM Autoscaling With CloudStack VR (14:55) Abhishek Kumar: Edge Zones In CloudStack (15:50)
  4. 4. What are VNFs? Virtual Network Function
  5. 5. Journey to VNFs • Very expensive • Highly proprietary • ASIC based • Long development cycle • More affordable • Off the shelf • x86 based • Shorter development cycle • Scalable cost • Very easy to trial • Fast releases
  6. 6. NFV
  7. 7. ETSI Framework VNF -> ACS VR
  8. 8. • Templates with multiple disks • Deployment time settings • Specialized hypervisor features • L2 connectivity for service-chaining Challenges back then
  9. 9. Service Chaining
  10. 10. 4.9 -> 4.16
  11. 11. Routed Dual Stack VR
  12. 12. Statically Routed IPv6 • 4.17 IPv6 Implementation • VPCs and Isolated Networks • Statically Routed • Nat’ed IPv4
  13. 13. User driven VLAN selection
  14. 14. User-Shared Networks Previously not available for Shared Networks
  15. 15. User-Shared Networks Normal end-user (aka non-root admin) We have a new field
  16. 16. User-Shared Networks API response to listnetworks lists the associated networks Networks with which a given network can be associated with.
  17. 17. Use Case – User VNF Deployment
  18. 18. Use Case – User VNF Deployment Isolated Network Add Isolated Network ACS VR
  19. 19. Use Case – User VNF Deployment Deploy VNF Template VNF’s upstream interface on Isolated Network Isolated Network ACS VR SDWAN VNF
  20. 20. Use Case – User VNF Deployment 1:1 NAT ACS VR<->VNF Isolated Network ACS VR Acquire Public IP for StaticNAT SDWAN VNF
  21. 21. Use Case – User VNF Deployment Create Layer2 Network Attach to VNF’s downstream Interface Isolated Network ACS VR L2 Network SDWAN VNF
  22. 22. Use Case – User VNF Deployment Create UserShared Network Associate to L2 Link Network Isolated Network ACS VR L2 Network UserShared
  23. 23. Use Case – User VNF Deployment Isolated Network ACS VR UserShared (VLAN A) SDWAN VNF User VMs
  24. 24. Use Case – User VNF Deployment
  25. 25. Use Case – User VNF Chaining Create Isolated
  26. 26. Use Case – User VNF Chaining Deploy VNF VM
  27. 27. Use Case – User VNF Chaining Acquire Public IP and apply Static NAT
  28. 28. Use Case – User VNF Chaining Create Layer2 Network L2 Network
  29. 29. Use Case – User VNF Chaining Deploy another VNF
  30. 30. Use Case – User VNF Chaining Create Another Layer 2 Network
  31. 31. Use Case – User VNF Chaining Add user- shared with associated network
  32. 32. Use Case – User VNF Chaining
  33. 33. Use Case – User VNF Deployment IPv6 IPv6 all the way IPv6 IPv6
  34. 34. Use Case – User VNF Deployment IPv6 IPv4 NAT 6to4 VNF IPv6
  35. 35. User-Driven Private Gateways Operational Overhead
  36. 36. User-Driven Private Gateways Not scalable
  37. 37. User-Driven Private Gateways
  38. 38. User-Driven Private Gateways
  39. 39. User-Driven Private Gateways
  40. 40. User-Driven Private Gateways
  41. 41. User-Driven Private Gateways
  42. 42. User-Driven Private Gateways
  43. 43. User-Driven Private Gateways - VNF
  44. 44. Associated Networks • Available in 4.17 • Empowers end-user • Enables richer topologies • Reduces operational overhead
  45. 45. Fixing the Problems
  46. 46. Programmable MTU New fields for Isolated Networks Public Interface MTU Private Interface MTU Global and Zone level settings: vr.public.interface.max.mtu vr.private.interface.max.mtu
  47. 47. Programmable MTU Private – MTU 1500 Public – MTU 1440
  48. 48. Configurable protocol option in firewall rules Static NAT
  49. 49. Configurable protocol option in firewall rules Somewhat limited
  50. 50. Configurable protocol option in firewall rules
  51. 51. Configurable SourceNAT IP Can’t be changed Decommissioning an IP range assigned to a zone is extremely disruptive
  52. 52. Configurable SourceNAT IP Now it can be changed Make SourceNat Make SourceNat Make SourceNat New option
  53. 53. Enhancement Ideas
  54. 54. Policy Based Routing Routing decisions taken on: • Source subnet • Port number • Type of Traffic • Network protocol • Packet size • Access list • Etc..etc.. Source 10.10.1.0/24 via VPC’s default gateway Source 10.10.2.0/24 via VPC’s private gateway
  55. 55. Routed IPv4 • Proposal: • Similar implementation as IPv6 • Dual-stack fully routed • Challenges: • Presentation of IPv4 ranges to ACS • Wasteful subnetting
  56. 56. Dynamic Routing • We all want it • We all need it • Many ideas how to do it • Let’s talk…
  57. 57. Taking ACS to the Edge 15:50 New York City Hall
  58. 58. Questions?

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