Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Data Intelligence for the Youth Employment Sector

0 vue

Publié le

Accessing data to support youth employment in Ontario.

Presentation from Hot Topics Luncheon at Amplify 2019, an annual leadership conference hosted by FirstWork, Ontario’s Youth Employment Network.

Publié dans : Économie & finance
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

  • Soyez le premier à aimer ceci

Data Intelligence for the Youth Employment Sector

  1. 1. LABOUR MARKET INFORMATION COUNCIL CONSEIL DE L’INFORMATION SUR LE MARCHÉ DU TRAVAIL Amplify 2019 Toronto, ON – 15 April 2019 Tony Bonen Director of Research, Data and Analytics Data Intelligence for the Youth Employment Sector
  2. 2. Labour Market Information Council (LMIC) Collect • Statistics Canada (RDCs) • Job posting data • Public opinion research Analyze • Quantitative research • Verify reliability • Identify data gaps Distribute • LMI Insights • Online dashboards • Open access LMIC Data Hub
  3. 3. Public Opinion Research dashboard lmic-cimt.ca/lmi-interactive-dashboard/
  4. 4. Top LMI Needs of Ontario Students
  5. 5. Data Gaps for Youth Job Openings • Many existing websites for current postings • Limited information on the future Wages • Data available, but may not be well-structured • More up-to-date and relevant wage information needed Skills • A huge data gap • Education is a common proxy, but need better methods Small gap Large gap
  6. 6. Skill demand by proxy: NOC 4-digit NOC codes are associated with the “typical education” required for the job: Level A : University degree (bachelor’s, master’s or doctorate) Level B : Some post-secondary education, college and apprenticeship Level C : Completion of secondary school, and some occupation training Level D : Below secondary school, and on-the-job training National Occupational Classification (NOC) “Skill Level”
  7. 7. Job Market Requires Higher Education Employment share on Ontario jobs by NOC “Skill Level”
  8. 8. But Educational Attainment increased faster Share of young workers (15 to 34) with greater educational attainment than is required by their occupation
  9. 9. Overqualification doesn’t pay for youths (15-34) Average earnings in “Level B” and “C” occupations by relative education level Level B : Some post-secondary education, college and apprenticeship Level C : Completion of secondary school, and some occupation training
  10. 10. It really doesn’t pay for young men (15-34) Level B : Some post-secondary education, college and apprenticeship Level C : Completion of secondary school, and some occupation training Average earnings in “Level B” and “C” occupations by relative education level
  11. 11. Getting the Information out there: Skills, Wages and Training Need better definition and measurement of skills • A common taxonomy for skills • Leverage new data sources (e.g., job posting data) Wage data needs to meet the needs to youth and other user groups • LMIC is conducting focus groups with college and university students across the country • Feedback and insights will inform the pilot project for the LMIC Data Hub
  12. 12. The Way Forward: LMIC Data Hub
  13. 13. QUESTIONS? …
  14. 14. Appendix: Ontario’s wage advantage falling Real hourly wage rate in Ontario and Canada
  15. 15. Appendix: As manufacturing employment has fallen Share of employees working in the manufacturing sector in Ontario and Canada

×