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  1. 1.  Geography & HistoryGeography & History  Political & Legal EnvironmentPolitical & Legal Environment  Distribution of IncomeDistribution of Income  Structure of EconomyStructure of Economy  Population & CulturePopulation & Culture  ReligionReligion  InfrastructureInfrastructure  Industry DescriptionIndustry Description  Establishment & CustomersEstablishment & Customers
  2. 2.  Located in Western Africa, bordering the NorthLocated in Western Africa, bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, between Ghana and LiberiaAtlantic Ocean, between Ghana and Liberia  Total area of 322,460 sq kmTotal area of 322,460 sq km  Largest CitiesLargest Cities  AbidjanAbidjan  BouakeBouake  DaloaDaloa  Climate: tropical along coastClimate: tropical along coast  warm and dry (Nov to March)warm and dry (Nov to March)  hot and dry (March to May)hot and dry (March to May)  hot and wet (June to October)hot and wet (June to October)
  3. 3.  The early history of Ivory Coast is virtually unknown,The early history of Ivory Coast is virtually unknown, although it is thought that a Neolithic culture existed there.although it is thought that a Neolithic culture existed there.  18931893 - Ivory Coast made into a French colony.- Ivory Coast made into a French colony.  19041904 - Ivory Coast becomes part of the French Federation of- Ivory Coast becomes part of the French Federation of West Africa.West Africa.  19581958 - Ivory Coast becomes a republic within the French- Ivory Coast becomes a republic within the French Community.Community.  19441944 - Felix Houphouet-Boigny, later to become Ivory Coast's- Felix Houphouet-Boigny, later to become Ivory Coast's first presidentfirst president  Type of Government: RepublicType of Government: Republic  Independence: August 7, 1960Independence: August 7, 1960  National Holiday: Independence DayNational Holiday: Independence Day
  4. 4.  Executive branchExecutive branch  Headed by a president, head of stateHeaded by a president, head of state  Elected for a 5 year termElected for a 5 year term  Commander in chief of the armed forcesCommander in chief of the armed forces  May negotiate and ratify certain treaties.May negotiate and ratify certain treaties.  The president selectsThe president selects  Prime minister, head of governmentPrime minister, head of government  CabinetCabinet  The formal Judicial systemThe formal Judicial system  Headed by a Supreme CourtHeaded by a Supreme Court  Includes the Court of Appeals and lower courts.Includes the Court of Appeals and lower courts.  National AssemblyNational Assembly  175 member legislature175 member legislature  Help organize Ivory coastHelp organize Ivory coast
  5. 5.  Based on FrenchBased on French  Civil law systemCivil law system  Customary lawCustomary law  Judicial review in the Constitutional Chamber of theJudicial review in the Constitutional Chamber of the Supreme CourtSupreme Court  French treaties, legal articles, and books areFrench treaties, legal articles, and books are instructive and informative on general principles ofinstructive and informative on general principles of law and are often used as a reference to determinelaw and are often used as a reference to determine points of Ivoirian lawpoints of Ivoirian law
  6. 6. GNIGNI $13,300,000,000$13,300,000,000 Population =Population = 17,100,00017,100,000 GNI/capitaGNI/capita $770$770 $13,487$13,487$10,056$10,056$4,225$4,225$2,717$2,717$1,805$1,805$1,031$1,031$793$793 335,294335,294670,588670,588670,588670,588670,588670,588670,588670,588670,588670,588335,294335,294 5.15.1 $2,644$2,644$1,972$1,972$828$828$533$533$354$354$202$202$156$156 $ 4.5 (B)$ 4.5 (B)$ 6.7 (B)$ 6.7 (B)$ 2.8 (B)$ 2.8 (B)$ 1.8 (B)$ 1.8 (B)$ 1.2 (B)$ 1.2 (B)$ 691.6 (M)$ 691.6 (M)$ 266 (M)$ 266 (M) 1,710,0001,710,0003,420,0003,420,0003,420,0003,420,0003,420,0003,420,0003,420,0003,420,0003,420,0003,420,0001,710,0001,710,000 34%34%50.70%50.70%21.30%21.30%13.70%13.70%9.10%9.10%5.20%5.20%2%2% 10%10%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%10%10% HighestHighestHighestHighestFourthFourthThirdThirdSecondSecondLowestLowestLowestLowest HH IncomeHH Income # HHs# HHs HH size =HH size = GNI/capitaGNI/capita GNIGNI Pop.Pop.
  7. 7.  GDP in 2004: U.S. $15.3 billionGDP in 2004: U.S. $15.3 billion  GDP/capita: U.S. $856.00GDP/capita: U.S. $856.00  Purchasing Power ParityPurchasing Power Parity  GDP: U.S. $25.2 billion (2004)GDP: U.S. $25.2 billion (2004)  GNI per capita: U.S. $1,390 (2004)GNI per capita: U.S. $1,390 (2004)  GNI/HH : $3,927GNI/HH : $3,927  Rate of inflation: 2.3% (2003)Rate of inflation: 2.3% (2003)  Rate of growth (population): 1.8% (2004)Rate of growth (population): 1.8% (2004)
  8. 8. XOF to USD 0.00176 0.00178 0.0018 0.00182 0.00184 0.00186 0.00188 1/1/2006 1/8/2006 1/15/2006 1/22/2006 1/29/2006 2/5/2006 2/12/2006 2/19/2006 2/26/2006 3/5/2006 3/12/2006 3/19/2006 3/26/2006 4/2/2006 1 CFA Franc (XOF) = .0019 US Dollar1 CFA Franc (XOF) = .0019 US Dollar
  9. 9. USD to XOF 520 525 530 535 540 545 550 555 1/1/2006 1/8/2006 1/15/2006 1/22/2006 1/29/2006 2/5/2006 2/12/2006 2/19/2006 2/26/2006 3/5/2006 3/12/2006 3/19/2006 3/26/2006 1 US Dollar = 537.5 CFA Franc (XOF)1 US Dollar = 537.5 CFA Franc (XOF)
  10. 10.  Agriculture: 27%Agriculture: 27%  Cocoa: 1.35 million metric tonsCocoa: 1.35 million metric tons  Coffee: 160,000 metric tonsCoffee: 160,000 metric tons  Industry: 21%Industry: 21%  Services: 52%Services: 52%  Exports of goods and services % of GDP: 42%Exports of goods and services % of GDP: 42%  Cocoa, coffee, timber, rubber, cotton, palm oil,Cocoa, coffee, timber, rubber, cotton, palm oil, pineapples, and bananaspineapples, and bananas  Imports of good and services % of GDP: 32.6%Imports of good and services % of GDP: 32.6%  Consumer goods, basic foodstuff, and capital goodsConsumer goods, basic foodstuff, and capital goods
  11. 11.  Literacy rate, adult females 15+ years: 38.2% (2000)Literacy rate, adult females 15+ years: 38.2% (2000)  Literacy rate, adult males 15+ years: 60.1% (2000)Literacy rate, adult males 15+ years: 60.1% (2000) Gross Enrollment RateGross Enrollment Rate  School enrollment, primary level (% of age group)School enrollment, primary level (% of age group)  Male: 86%Male: 86%  Female: 89%Female: 89%  School enrollment, secondary level (% of age group)School enrollment, secondary level (% of age group)  Male: 33%Male: 33%  Female: 18%Female: 18%
  12. 12.  Fertility rate, birth per women: 4.5 (2003)Fertility rate, birth per women: 4.5 (2003)  Life expectancy at birthLife expectancy at birth  Total years: 45.1 (2003)Total years: 45.1 (2003)  Female: 44.76Female: 44.76  Male: 40.27Male: 40.27  Mortality rate, infants (total per 1,000 live births):Mortality rate, infants (total per 1,000 live births): 117 (2003)117 (2003)
  13. 13.
  14. 14. 29294646626291914040United StatesUnited States 16165454464620207777West AfricaWest Africa LTOLTOUAIUAIMASMASIDVIDVPDIPDICountryCountry
  15. 15.  Indigenous 10%-20%Indigenous 10%-20%  Muslim 35%-40%Muslim 35%-40%  Christian (Catholic, Protestant and otherChristian (Catholic, Protestant and other denominations) 25%-35%.denominations) 25%-35%.  The majority of foreigners (migratory workers)The majority of foreigners (migratory workers)  Muslims (70%)Muslims (70%)  Christian (20%)Christian (20%)
  16. 16. Telecommunications:Telecommunications:  Telephones-main lines in use: 328,000Telephones-main lines in use: 328,000  Telephone-mobile cellular: 1,236,000Telephone-mobile cellular: 1,236,000  Ivoirians ownIvoirians own  More than 3 million televisionMore than 3 million television  7 million radios7 million radios  Television broadcast stations: 14Television broadcast stations: 14  Households with televisions: 35%Households with televisions: 35%  Internet users: 90,000Internet users: 90,000  Most users connect through the cyber cafesMost users connect through the cyber cafes  Internet hosts: 3,795Internet hosts: 3,795  Personal Computers: 6,100Personal Computers: 6,100
  17. 17. Physical:Physical:  Paved roads:Paved roads:  Over 43,000 milesOver 43,000 miles  3,750 primary roads3,750 primary roads  3,666 paved secondary roads3,666 paved secondary roads  Energy Use (kg of oil equivalent): 418.1 (2000)Energy Use (kg of oil equivalent): 418.1 (2000)  Electricity Consumption (kwh): 2.983 billion (2001)Electricity Consumption (kwh): 2.983 billion (2001)  Aircraft departures: 2,300 (2000)Aircraft departures: 2,300 (2000)  Internal Freshwater resources per capita (cubic meters): 4,573.7Internal Freshwater resources per capita (cubic meters): 4,573.7 (2003)(2003)  Urban population (% of total population): 45%Urban population (% of total population): 45%  Airports: 37 (7 with paved runways)Airports: 37 (7 with paved runways)  Waterways: 980 km (navigable rivers, canals, and coastal lagoons)Waterways: 980 km (navigable rivers, canals, and coastal lagoons)
  18. 18.  Based on FrenchBased on French  Civil law systemCivil law system  Legal tradition which is the base of the law in the majority of countriesLegal tradition which is the base of the law in the majority of countries of the worldof the world  Customary lawCustomary law  Consist of established patterns of behavior that can be objectivelyConsist of established patterns of behavior that can be objectively verified within a particular social settingverified within a particular social setting  Law exists where certain legal practice is observed and relevantLaw exists where certain legal practice is observed and relevant actors consider it to be lawactors consider it to be law  In order to do business in Ivory Coast all document must be in FrenchIn order to do business in Ivory Coast all document must be in French  Stuffim & BacomStuffim & Bacom  Have 125 member law firm that are base in St. Paul MinnesotaHave 125 member law firm that are base in St. Paul Minnesota  Maintains offices inMaintains offices in  Washington, D.C.Washington, D.C.  Denver, ColoradoDenver, Colorado  Paris, FranceParis, France  Harley Hambone – International Finance expert and master salesmanHarley Hambone – International Finance expert and master salesman  Sylvester Soupspoon – Transportation AttorneySylvester Soupspoon – Transportation Attorney
  19. 19.  Ivory Coast Investment Promotion (CEPIC)Ivory Coast Investment Promotion (CEPIC)  Promote joint-venture operationsPromote joint-venture operations  Investment in Ivory CoastInvestment in Ivory Coast  Assists with the necessary formalities ofAssists with the necessary formalities of  RegisteringRegistering  IncorporatingIncorporating  ModifyingModifying  dissolvingdissolving  The law of both the Ivory Coast and Kenya place serious restrictionsThe law of both the Ivory Coast and Kenya place serious restrictions on foreign law firms establishing local offices with foreign lawyers:on foreign law firms establishing local offices with foreign lawyers:  Requirements to set up officeRequirements to set up office  To employ a majority of local lawyers or to ensure that their local office is managedTo employ a majority of local lawyers or to ensure that their local office is managed by a local lawyer.by a local lawyer.  To practice before the courts of either country must be certified by the local barTo practice before the courts of either country must be certified by the local bar associationassociation..
  20. 20. Safari Air LinesSafari Air Lines (SAL)(SAL)  An international airfreight companyAn international airfreight company  Major aircraft carrier for all of East, Central, and West AfricaMajor aircraft carrier for all of East, Central, and West Africa  Almost a $1 million per year account for Stuffim & Bacon whichAlmost a $1 million per year account for Stuffim & Bacon which includes work with airline regulatory agencies in the U.S., as wellincludes work with airline regulatory agencies in the U.S., as well as general advice regarding international aviation matteras general advice regarding international aviation matter Livingston Tours, INCLivingston Tours, INC  A small U.S. based travel agency that specializes in three monthA small U.S. based travel agency that specializes in three month African safaris.African safaris.  Stuffim bills Livingston less than $500,000 per year, mainly forStuffim bills Livingston less than $500,000 per year, mainly for preparing and negotiating agreements with international charterpreparing and negotiating agreements with international charter airlines and local tour operators serving East Africa.airlines and local tour operators serving East Africa.
  21. 21.  GhanaGhana  Bentsi-EnchillBentsi-Enchill && LetsaLetsa  General Law Consult (GLC)General Law Consult (GLC)  LiberiaLiberia  Sannoh & Associates Law FirmSannoh & Associates Law Firm  NamibiaNamibia  Lorentz & BoneLorentz & Bone  P FP F KoepKoep & Co& Co  NigeriaNigeria  Ajumogobia, Okeke, Barristers & SolicitorsAjumogobia, Okeke, Barristers & Solicitors  Abdulai Taiwo & CoAbdulai Taiwo & Co  Sierra LoerneSierra Loerne  A. Tejan-Cole and AssociatesA. Tejan-Cole and Associates
  22. 22.  USAUSA  Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & KatzWachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz  Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & FlomSkadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom  EuropeEurope  FreshfieldsFreshfields BruckhausBruckhaus DeringerDeringer LLPLLP  ArglesArgles StonehamStoneham BurstowsBurstows (ASB Law)(ASB Law)  SingaporeSingapore  Allen and GledhillAllen and Gledhill
  23. 23.  Largest economies in Sub-Saharan AfricaLargest economies in Sub-Saharan Africa  Business infrastructure superior to many otherBusiness infrastructure superior to many other countries in the regioncountries in the region  Industrial and transportation hub of the regionIndustrial and transportation hub of the region  Tax advantagesTax advantages  Lawyers and accountants are among theLawyers and accountants are among the entities that ensure that all appropriate lawsentities that ensure that all appropriate laws and procedures regarding business lawand procedures regarding business law practices are followed.practices are followed.
  24. 24.  Remain mired in political/military crisis that hadRemain mired in political/military crisis that had undermined the economy and investor confidenceundermined the economy and investor confidence  Physically divided and resumption of civil war, social unrestPhysically divided and resumption of civil war, social unrest could occur at any given momentcould occur at any given moment  Uncertain legal protections & weak judiciaryUncertain legal protections & weak judiciary  Concerns about the rule of lawConcerns about the rule of law  Government ability to provide equal protectionGovernment ability to provide equal protection  Language barrier with U.S. companiesLanguage barrier with U.S. companies  To establish a presence in Ivory Coast have two situationTo establish a presence in Ivory Coast have two situation compared to U.S.compared to U.S.  It is more costlyIt is more costly  Involved more proceduresInvolved more procedures
  25. 25.  Corruption: 152/159 = 1.9 making it one of the most corruptCorruption: 152/159 = 1.9 making it one of the most corrupt nations in the worldnations in the world  2002 – 2.72002 – 2.7  2003 – 2.12003 – 2.1  2004 – 2.02004 – 2.0  2005 – 1.92005 – 1.9  Greatest impact onGreatest impact on  Judicial proceedingsJudicial proceedings  Contract awardsContract awards  CustomsCustoms  Tax issuesTax issues  If the political situation doesn’t stabilizeIf the political situation doesn’t stabilize  The damage to the economy and commercial environment will continueThe damage to the economy and commercial environment will continue
  26. 26.  Economist Intelligence Unit expects real GDP growthEconomist Intelligence Unit expects real GDP growth to stagnate: 1.2%to stagnate: 1.2%  Inflation is forecast to increase to 4.5%Inflation is forecast to increase to 4.5%  Even though for its uncertaintyEven though for its uncertainty  Business continue to functionBusiness continue to function  Profits are down but still have the ability to goProfits are down but still have the ability to go onon
  27. 27. 1.1. Advise Hambone of the various business, legal, political, andAdvise Hambone of the various business, legal, political, and cultural obstacles standing in the way of opening an office incultural obstacles standing in the way of opening an office in each country and how he can best overcome them. Also make aeach country and how he can best overcome them. Also make a recommendation as to where you think the office should berecommendation as to where you think the office should be located and how (and by whom) it should be staffed andlocated and how (and by whom) it should be staffed and operatedoperated 2.2. Advise Soupspoon as to how he can convince his fellowAdvise Soupspoon as to how he can convince his fellow partners that an African office will be profitable for the firm, ifpartners that an African office will be profitable for the firm, if not in the short term, then in the long term. This would includenot in the short term, then in the long term. This would include the type of representation arrangements that the Stuffim firmthe type of representation arrangements that the Stuffim firm should make with its clients in Africa to minimize its financialshould make with its clients in Africa to minimize its financial risk.risk. 3.3. How do you believe Stuffim & Bacom, as a growingHow do you believe Stuffim & Bacom, as a growing international law firm, should respond to terrorist threats?international law firm, should respond to terrorist threats?
  28. 28.  Ivory Coast maintains the historical, cultural and economicIvory Coast maintains the historical, cultural and economic links with France and Europelinks with France and Europe  The younger generations are more exposed to the AmericanThe younger generations are more exposed to the American cultureculture  IvoiriansIvoirians  Trust in a business relationship is paramountTrust in a business relationship is paramount  Prefer to conduct face-to-face contactPrefer to conduct face-to-face contact

Notes de l'éditeur

  • The bigger cities are
    Abidjan (south) – 3,000,000
    Bouake (Central) – 850,000
    Daloa (West) – 300,000
    San-Pedro (South West) – 250,000
    Korhogo (North)- 250,000
    Yamoussoukro (Center) – 250,000
    Largest Cities Abidjan, Bouaké, Daloa, Yamoussoukro, Korhogo
    According to the Ethinc in 1998
    Baoule
    Seneuho
    Dioula
    Agny
    Further dialets
    Bete
    Gouro
    Yacouba
    Guere
    Wobe
    Agni
    Lobi
    Malink
    Gagou
    Aborure
    Ebrie
    Attie
    Abron
    Godie
    Neyo
    Adioukrou
  • National Day 7 August; Independence Day Religions Christian, Muslim, others
    1960 Constitution entitles all Ivoirians to a fair public trial
    Indigent defendants were also entitled to legal counsel by court-appointed attorneys. In practice, public defenders were often unavailable, and there was a vast difference between the representation accorded rich and poor clients. According to the Constitution, judges are subject only to the law, and the president, with the assistance of the Superior Council of Magistrates, is charged with ensuring the independence of the judiciary. Because the president of the republic controlled appointments to the courts, the judiciary seldom, if ever, opposed the president.
  • POLITICAL CONDITIONSLaurent Gbagbo has been President since October 26, 2000. Gbagbo took power following a popular uprising supporting his election victory after junta leader Gen. Robert Guei claimed a dubious victory in the 2000 presidential elections. General Guei had assumed power on December 25, 1999, following a military coup d'etat against the government of former President Henri Konan Bedie. Coup attempts in 2001 and 2002 escalated into a rebellion and crisis which culminated in the January 2003 signing of an accord for a power-sharing national reconciliation government. Implementation of the 2003 accord has made halting progress, and Ivory Coast remains divided, with rebels occupying the northern half of the country. French Licorne and UNOCI peacekeeping troops police a demilitarized zone between government and New Forces positions.
    Ivory Coast's relations with the U.S. have traditionally been excellent, but have been somewhat strained since Section 508 restrictions curtailed nonhumanitarian aid following the December 1999 military coup. The restrictions were not lifted following the 2000 elections due to questionable governmental interference before and during the election.
    Looking toward the country's future, the fundamental issue is whether its political system following the upheavals of recent years will provide for enduring stability, which is critical for investor confidence and further economic development. The political system in Ivory Coast is president-dominated. The prime minister concentrates principally on coordinating and implementing economic policy. The key decisions--political, military, or economic--continue to be made by the president.
    However, political dialogue is much freer today than prior to 1990, especially due to the opposition press, which vocalizes its criticism of the regime. Beginning in 1990, Ivory Coast evolved, with relatively little violence or dislocation, from a single-party state. Opposition parties, independent newspapers, and independent trade unions were made legal at that time. Since those major changes occurred, the country's pace of political change had been slow, prior to the period of turmoil ushered in by the December 1999 coup.
    Whether further democratic reform will take place, adequate to meet future challenges, is unknown. As is generally true in the region, the business environment is one in which personal contact and connections remain important, where rule of law does not prevail with assurance, and where the legislative and judicial branches of the government remain weak. The political system is becoming less centralized, with the president stepping out of his role as ruling party leader, while attempting to decentralize many legislative functions. President Gbagbo has promised less executive interference in the judicial system, but it still lacks basic strength and independence.
    Ivory Coast has a high population growth rate, a high crime rate (particularly in Abidjan), a high incidence of AIDS, a multiplicity of tribes, sporadic student unrest, a differential rate of in-country development according to region, and a dichotomy of religion associated with region and tribe. These factors put stress on the political system and could become more of a problem if the government does not succeed in implementing the reforms enshrined in the 2003 Linas-Marcoussis Accord and if the economy does not return to consistent growth.
    Political PartiesThe Ivoirian constitution affords the legislature some independence, but it has not been widely exercised. Until 1990, all legislators were from the PDCI. The December 2000 National Assembly election was marred by violence, irregularities, and a very low participation rate. Largely because of the RDR boycott of the election to protest the invalidation of the candidacy of party president Alassane Ouattara, the participation rate was only 33%. In addition, the election could not take place in 26 electoral districts in the north because RDR activists disrupted polling places, burned ballots, and threatened the security of election officials. Following the legislative by-elections in January 2001, 223 of the 225 seats of the National Assembly were filled. The FPI held 96 seats, the PDCI 94 seats, the PIT 4 seats, very small parties 2 seats, independent candidates 22 seats, and the RDR--in spite of its boycott of the legislative elections--5 seats.
    Until it took the reins of government in the 2000 elections, the FPI party was the oldest opposition party. Moderate in outlook, it has a socialist coloration but one which was more concerned with democratic reform than radical economic change. It is strongest in the Bete ethnic areas (southwest) of President Laurent Gbagbo. The PDCI's "core" region may be described as the terrain of the Baoule ethnic group in the country's center and east, home of both Houphouet-Boigny and Bedie; however, the PDCI is represented in all parts of Ivory Coast. Former members of the PDCI's reformist wing formed the originally non-ideological RDR in September 1994. They hoped that former Prime Minister Alassane Ouattara would run and prevail in the 1995 presidential election, but Ouattara was subsequently disqualified by Bedie-sponsored legislation requiring 5-year residency. The RDR is now strongest in the mostly Muslim north.
    The FPI and RDR boycotted the presidential election of October 1995 because of Ouattara's disqualification and the absence of an independent electoral commission, among other grievances. Their "active boycott" produced a certain amount of violence and hundreds of arrests, with a number of those arrested not tried for 2-1/2 years. These grievances remained unresolved, adding to the political instability leading to the 1999 coup and 2002 rebellion.
  • Agriculture (27% of GDP, 2004): Products--cocoa, coffee, timber, rubber, corn, rice, tropical foods.Industry (21% of GDP, 2004): Types--food processing, textiles. Services (2004): 52% of GDP.Trade (2004): Exports (41% of GDP)--cocoa, coffee, timber, rubber, cotton, palm oil, pineapples, bananas. Major markets--U.S., France, Germany, Netherlands. Total imports (28% of GDP; U.S. imports, in 2003 $113.6 million)--consumer goods, basic foodstuffs (rice, wheat), capital goods. Major suppliers--France, Nigeria, Italy, U.S., Germany.
    ECONOMYThe Ivoirian economy is largely market-based and depends heavily on the agricultural sector. Between 60% and 70% of the Ivoirian people are engaged in some form of agricultural activity. The economy performed poorly in the 1980s and early 1990s, and high population growth coupled with economic decline resulted in a steady fall in living standards. Gross national product per capita was $727 in 1996 but had fallen to $669 by 2003. (It was substantially higher two decades ago.) A majority of the population remains dependent on smallholder cash crop production. Principal exports are cocoa, coffee, cotton, pineapples, tuna, and tropical woods. Principal U.S. exports are rice and wheat, plastic materials and resins, kraft paper, agricultural chemicals, telecommunications, and oil and gas equipment. Principal U.S. imports are cocoa and cocoa products, petroleum, rubber, and coffee.
  • Ivory Coast has more than 60 ethnic groups, usually classified into five principal divisions: Akan (east and center, including Lagoon peoples of the southeast), Krou (southwest), Southern Mande (west), Northern Mande (northwest), Senoufo/Lobi (north center and northeast). The Baoules, in the Akan division, probably comprise the single largest subgroup with 15%-20% of the population. They are based in the central region around Bouake and Yamoussoukro. The Betes in the Krou division, the Senoufos in the north, and the Malinkes in the northwest and the cities are the next largest groups, with 10%-15% each of the national population. Most of the principal divisions have a significant presence in neighboring countries.
    Of the more than 5 million non-Ivoirian Africans living in Ivory Coast, one-third to one-half are from Burkina Faso; the rest are from Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Nigeria, Benin, Senegal, Liberia, and Mauritania. The non-African expatriate community includes roughly 20,000 French and possibly 100,000 Lebanese. As of mid-November 2004, thousands of expatriates, African and non-African, had fled from the violence in Ivory Coast. The number of elementary school-aged children attending classes increased from 22% in 1960 to 67% in 1995.
  • InfrastructureBy developing country standards, Ivory Coast has an outstanding infrastructure. There is an excellent network of more than 8,000 miles of paved roads; good telecommunications services, including a public data communications network, cellular phones, and Internet access. There are two active ports. Abidjan is the most modern in West Africa and the largest between Casablanca and Cape Town on the West African littoral. Rail links from the port north into Burkina Faso are being upgraded. There is regular air service within the region and to and from Europe and modern real estate developments for commercial, industrial, retail, and residential use. Abidjan remains one of the most modern and livable cities in the region. Its school system is good by regional standards and includes an international school--whose enrollment dropped sharply due to the November 2004 crisis--based on U.S. curriculum and several excellent French-based schools.
    Recent political and economic problems have delayed Ivory Coast's planned public investment program. The government's public investment plan accords priority to investment in human capital, but it also will provide for significant spending on economic infrastructure needed to sustain growth. Continued infrastructure development has been brought into question because of private sector uncertainty. In the new environment of government disengagement from productive activities and in the wake of recent privatization, anticipated investments in the petroleum, electricity, water, and telecommunications sectors, and in part in the transportation sector, will be financed without any direct government intervention. A return to political and economic stability is critical if Ivory Coast is to realize its potential in the region.
    (http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2846.htm)
    Good telecommunications infrastructure and growing internet market have laid the grounds for further development of E-Commerce.
    Past few years, number of computers connected to the internet had increase and it expected to continue.
    Number of local internet service providers also grown w/ the interest of the internet users, improvement of quality service and lower fees.
    Most users still connect to the internet from cyber cafes as internet access in homes is still not very common.
    Credit cards are not widely used in ivory coast
  • The investor can be granted tax advantages such as tax exemption on industrial and commercial profits or on non-commercial profits from 5 to 8 years, depending on the region.
    For U.S. businesses interested in doing business in West Africa, and particularly in Ivory Coast, lawyers and accountants are among the entities that ensure that all appropriate laws and procedures regarding business law practices are followed.
    For U.S. businesses dealing with Ivoirian business partners, all official documents, papers, contracts, court papers, corporate documents, must be in the French language.
    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1052/is_n1-2_v118/ai_19118716#continue
    http://www.d.umn.edu/~jvileta/ibr/ibr_c.html#cote
    http://www.doingbusiness.org/ExploreEconomies/Default.aspx?economyid=51 (ivory coast)
    http://www.doingbusiness.org/ExploreEconomies/Default.aspx?economyid=197 (U.S)
  • Corruption make it one of the most corrupt nation in the world.
    Because it is corrupt doing business will difficult
    http://africanhistory.about.com/
    Primary use of French language, business practices and technical standards. However, there are some Ivoirian businesses trying to overcome the language barrier and work directly with U.S. companies
    Establishing a presence in Côte d’Ivoire for an American company is generally a more costly and involved procedure compared to costs in the United States
  • GOVERNMENTIvory Coast's constitution of the Second Republic (2000) provides for a strong presidency within the framework of a separation of powers. The executive is personified in the president, elected for a 5-year term. The president is the head of state and commander in chief of the armed forces, may negotiate and ratify certain treaties, and may submit a bill to a national referendum or to the National Assembly. According to the constitution, the president of the National Assembly assumes the presidency for 45-90 days in the event of a vacancy and organizes new elections in which the winner completes the remainder of the deceased president's term. The president selects the prime minister, who is the head of government. The cabinet is selected by and is responsible to the prime minister.
    The unicameral National Assembly is composed of 225 members elected by direct universal suffrage for a 5-year term concurrently with the president. It passes on legislation typically introduced by the president, although it also can introduce legislation.
    The judicial system culminates in the Supreme Court. The High Court of Justice is competent to try government officials for major offenses. There is also an independent Constitutional Council which has seven members appointed by the president that is responsible for, inter alia, the determination of candidate eligibility in presidential and legislative elections, the announcement of final election results, the conduct of referendums, and the constitutionality of legislation.
    For administrative purposes, Ivory Coast is divided into 19 regions and 58 departments. Each region and department is headed by a prefect appointed by the central government. In 2002, the country held its first departmental elections to select departmental councils to oversee local infrastructure development and maintenance as well as economic and social development plans and projects. There are 196 communes, each headed by an elected mayor, plus the city of Abidjan with 10 mayors
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