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Visual vocabulary

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Visual vocabulary

  1. 1. Visual Vocabulary
  2. 2. Exodus /Emigration
  3. 3. Locust
  4. 4. Midst/Middle
  5. 5. Homage/Respect
  6. 6. Mortar
  7. 7. Plague/Calamity
  8. 8. Religious
  9. 9. Roast
  10. 10. Spare • To Choose not to punish or harm someone
  11. 11. Symbol jattbook.com
  12. 12. Sympathetic
  13. 13. Vital
  14. 14. Test Your Vocabulary What 6-letter word begins with "f" and can mean "the fidelity of a vassal or feudal tenant to his lord"?
  15. 15. Fealty Loyalty to a person or group
  16. 16. Quixotic Quixotic • Unrealistic
  17. 17. Inherent • Natural
  18. 18. Obstensibly • Apparently
  19. 19. Salubrious • Healthful
  20. 20. Pithy • Concise
  21. 21. Prodigius • Huge
  22. 22. Rancor • Bitterness
  23. 23. Irreverant • Disrespectful
  24. 24. Interim • Temporary
  25. 25. Quiescent • Inactive
  26. 26. Antimetabole-Rhetorical Device
  27. 27. Matutinal/Occuring in the morning
  28. 28. Odontoid • of or resembling a mouth; toothlike.
  29. 29. The Power of Verbal Intelligence • Tony Buzan
  30. 30. Introduce • (c) To bring in or present • ‘I would like to introduce you to my new friend, as I am sure both of you have much in common.’
  31. 31. Introflex • (b) To bend inward • We need to introflex the material in order to provide greater stability.’
  32. 32. Introceptive • a) Capable of receiving into itself • ‘We need an introceptive object in order to contain this material.’
  33. 33. Introgression • (a) The act of going in; entering • ‘In biology, introgression has acquired the specific meaning of transferring genetic information from one species into another.’
  34. 34. Intromit • (c) To allow to enter; insert (from the Latin ‘mittere’, ‘to send’) • ‘We intromit our hands into gloves.’
  35. 35. Introject • (d) To throw into • ‘I would like to introject some new ideas into this important creative discussion.’
  36. 36. Introspect • (a) To look within (from the Latin ‘specere’, ‘to look at’) • ‘When I examine my own thoughts and feelings I introspect.’
  37. 37. Intromission • (b) To insert (from the zoological term ‘intromittent’, meaning adapted for insertion) • ‘Intromission is necessary if conception is to be achieved.’
  38. 38. Introvert • (a) One who turns inward (from the Latin ‘vertere’, ‘to turn’) • ‘He was an introvert, keeping himself to himself, shunning company, and constantly contemplating the meaning of life.’
  39. 39. Intropression • (b) Pressure within (from the Latin ‘pressura’, ‘a pressing’) • ‘His constant worrying resulted in increasing intropression.’
  40. 40. Word Power Booster Number 2 • fascinating • adjectives
  41. 41. DIDACTIC • (a) Teacher-like; instructive (from the Greek ‘didaskein’, ‘to teach’) • ‘When explaining things, she had a didactic manner.’
  42. 42. SURREPTITIOUS • 2. (c) Stealthy or secret (from the Latin ‘surripere’, ‘to steal’) • ‘The surreptitious behaviour going on around him eventually made • him feel uneasy.’
  43. 43. HERETICAL (d) Revolutionary; contrary to the official/established viewpoint (from the Greek ‘hairesis’, ‘choice’ Their heretical beliefs led them into direct conflict with the government, schools and church.
  44. 44. COPIOUS • (b) Abundant; plentiful (from the Latin ‘copia’, ‘plenty’) • After the perfect summer and autumn, with ideal conditions for plants,the abundant harvest yielded a copious supply of fruit, corn and vegetables.’
  45. 45. IMPERATIVE • (c) Vital (from the Latin ‘imperare’, ‘to command’) • ‘It is imperative to upgrade the education system if the nation wishes • to be culturally and economically successful.’
  46. 46. INEFFACEABLE • (b) Incapable of being erased; indelible (from the French ‘effacer’, ‘to • obliterate’) • The memories of their time together were so vivid, so wonderful that • they could never be destroyed. They were ineffaceable.’
  47. 47. INESTIMABLE • (b) Priceless; immeasurable (from the Latin ‘aestimare’, ‘to determine, • appraise’) • ‘Despite the attempts of people to price the drawings and paintings of • Leonardo, they are of inestimable value.’
  48. 48. UNPRECEDENTED • (a) Never known or done before (from the Latin ‘prae’, ‘before’ and • ‘cedere’, ‘to go’) • The success of the Beatles was an unprecedented musical • phenomenon.’
  49. 49. UNEQUIVOCAL • (b) Unambiguous; leaving no doubt (from the Latin ‘equi’, ‘equally’ and • ‘vocare’, ‘to call’) • ‘Her statement was so clear; so plain that it was impossible to • misunderstand her – it was an unequivocal statement.’
  50. 50. CATEGORICAL • (a) Bluntly and unconditionally expressed (from the Greek ‘kategorein’,‘to state, assert’) • ‘Her statement was categorical; there were no ifs, ands or buts about it – it was absolute.’

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