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Meeting the Needs ofthe Industry
Esri has completely rewritten its software to give managers simpler software to
maintain,...
Implementing g.net in the
petroleum industry means
vendors can provide high-quality
data, integrators can provide
applicat...
ArcUser Online
October - December 2002
Search ArcUser:
The Second Revolution
Continued...
With information supplied by thi...
and applications interface. This approach lets the commercial marketplace regulate
the pace of application development and...
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The second revolution

Esri ArcUser, Oct.-Dec.2002, co-authored with Barbara Shields

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The second revolution

  1. 1. LinkedIn didn’t allow posting the original: www.esri.com/news/arcuser/1002/umbrella1of2.html _______________________________________________________________ ArcUser Online October - December 2002 Search ArcUser: The Second Revolution From initial exploration through acquisition and production to final divestiture, spatial information is key to any petroleum venture. As the science, engineering, and economic aspects ofextracting and distributing petroleum evolve, geospatial tools and solutions are at the forefront of an ongoing revolution in the industry. The results of this revolution are staggering--information derived from raw data has resulted in greater production and efficiency. Yet there is a second revolution on the horizon: as independent data stores grow exponentially, market forces drive businesses to build, manage, distribute, and utilize this information in new and innovative ways. Concerns over meeting rapidly growing demands for energy and accountability while strictly adhering to ever proliferating regulations requires supplying information to more users throughout organizations and across global networks. However, petroleum companies are in business to find, produce, and sell oil--not process data.The future of the industry lies in interoperable data. Rich databases linked togetherand accessed through intuitive interfaces based on a geographic framework can make this a reality. Esri's industry-standard,scalable software and open Internet architectures can link global systems in one network. Data courtesy of Eagle Information Mapping. The finger- like salt dome, originally created in ArcView 3.2 and rendered in ArcScene, shows formation onlap and deviated well bores.
  2. 2. Meeting the Needs ofthe Industry Esri has completely rewritten its software to give managers simpler software to maintain, users a consistent look and feel across a software family that provides increasing functionality, and developers a new set of tools. Esri software supports a variety of operational workflows. ArcSDE manages spatial data in database management systems.ArcGIS supplies the right tools on the desktop for data integration, analysis,and display. ArcIMS serves maps and data across Intranets and the Internet and allows communication with handheld devices in the field running ArcPad. Locating data inside or outside an organization became more efficient with the introduction of ArcIMS Metadata Services. Now users can easily publish and browse metadata. These innovations localize data production and management and provide enterprise architecture for ubiquitous data access.Geographic and temporal components of data management can be fully integrated within this framework and data accuracy, integrity, and data access are optimized. Optional ArcGIS extensions supply three-dimensional modeling, spatial analysis, and geostatisticalanalysis functionality. ArcMap, one of the ArcGIS Desktop applications, supports the high-quality cartography needed for mapping geologic and othertypes of data used by the petroleum industry. Maps produced in ArcMap can be shared online without re-creating them using the ArcIMS ArcMap Server extension. With ArcMap Server, data from geodatabases,coverages,CAD drawings, and shapefiles can be displayed via an ArcIMS client. Maps with customsymbolization and other ArcMap features can also be shared with non-GIS users who have ArcReader. A free and easy-to-use product, ArcReader lets users view, explore, and print map files that have been created from ArcMap documents using the ArcPublisher extension for ArcGIS. Each new release of Esri software brings significant enhancements.ArcGIS 8.2 provides powerful and easy-to-use dynamic segmentation tools. The release of ArcGIS 8.3 will add full topology to the geodatabase.ArcGIS ArcSurvey, an extension to the ArcGIS Desktop products,will represent survey measurements and observations on a map and manage survey data in a geodatabase. Framework for a Global Economy The Internet provides a new style of information architecture for petroleum organizations that promotes the exchange of information in a global economy. Esri's g.net architecture allows users to share GIS information from distributed sources through one comprehensive yet simple interface. Information maintained through a virtual global network is distributed to the desktop to meet specific needs.
  3. 3. Implementing g.net in the petroleum industry means vendors can provide high-quality data, integrators can provide applications that use this data, and users can create custom portals for disseminating information throughout enterprises. The Digital Energy Atlas and Library (DEAL), designed and operated by the British Geological Survey, provides an example of a g.net application that makes petroleum data accessible.Using ArcIMS, the DEAL Web site (http://www.ukdeal.co.uk) provides access to data on offshore exploration and production of hydrocarbons on the United Kingdom continental shelf through reference information and a multivendor data products catalog. This issue of ArcUser describes anotherg.net implementation by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Central Energy Resources Team (CERT), which is providing National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) results online. Continued on page 2 Data courtesy of IHS EnergyModel of a region showing natural and manmade features with boundary and geologic information.
  4. 4. ArcUser Online October - December 2002 Search ArcUser: The Second Revolution Continued... With information supplied by this new global GIS network, a financier can better understand the economic, social, political, or environmental reasons that justify spending money re-routing a pipeline or a government official can show constituents why an oil exploration should or should not be allowed. New technologies and the global g.net architecture provide a new paradigm for linking and distributing information. The development of data models is the final component necessary for an integrated GIS solution for the petroleum industry.Data models are practical templates for implementing GIS projects for specific industries and applications. Esri is working with users and partners in designing the essential, not the comprehensive, data model for the industry, which will be based loosely on the Public Petroleum Data Model (PPDM). This data model will be published and shared to help users and partners to deploy, extend, and customize ArcGIS using standard geodatabase capabilities whenever possible. The petroleum industry is one of Esri's oldest markets. With 10 of the largest oil companies as users,Esri enjoys a preeminent position in this market. The Esri Petroleum User Group (PUG), started in 1991, is a self-administered, self-financed special interest group that serves the common interests of Esri's petroleum industry clients and has nearly 3,500 members worldwide. GIS is used by 90 percent of upstreamexploration departments across asset teams worldwide. The Enterprise Spatial Data Warehouse implemented by Royal Dutch/Shell exemplifies how Exploration and Production (E&P) applications can be integrated from the serverto the Web using metadata as a library card catalog metaphor for locating data. Likewise Chevron-Texaco Corp. has coordinated upstreamand downstreamapplications worldwide for almost a decade. Indigopool.com, a Schlumberger company that provides secure online acquisitions and divestiture services, shows how companies such as Schlumberger and Landmark, a Halliburton company, can further incorporate the three- dimensional/time aspect of E&P into Web delivery systems. Esri neither builds nor sells specific petroleum database solutions but encourages third party implementations of Esri technology based on Pipeline and Petroleum and Land Parcel standards including both underlying physicaldatabase capability
  5. 5. and applications interface. This approach lets the commercial marketplace regulate the pace of application development and the cost is shared through the user community. Through a very active development program and a close working partnership with the leading industry players, Esri is providing software tools and architecture that closely fits the industry's business needs.

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