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DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING
OF A CONCEPTUAL
FRAMEWORK FOR ASKING
ABOUT INTOXICATION: A MIXED
METHODS APPROACH
Presentation at ...
Long
term
goal
Initial
focus
Target Objective
This
paper
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Lt...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 3
EXAMPLES OF EXTANT SURVEY
QUESTIONS
To what extent ...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 4
OVERVIEW OF METHODOLOGY
Literature
review
Integrate...
5The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.)
QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 6
INTEGRATED GROUPS
Qualitative Research
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 7
QUALITATIVE RESEARCH FINDINGS
“I know I’ve had enou...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 8
STAGES OF INTOXICATION
Stage 1: Start to feel warm ...
9The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.)
QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 10
SURVEY OVERVIEW
o N= 1,392
o Age 16+
o Victoria
o ...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 11
QUANT – NEW APPROACH TO ASKING
ABOUT INTOXICATION
...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 12
RESULTS OF COGNITIVE TESTING
• Understood and were...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 13
HOW WERE INTOXICATED BEHAVIOURS
RATED?
Sober
Feeli...
14The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.)
DISCUSSION
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 15
DISCUSSION – NEED FOR MEASURES
Shift the alcohol c...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 16
DISCUSSION –NEW APPROACH
Rate
intoxication
behavio...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 17
LIMITATIONS OF THE RESEARCH
Small sample size in
q...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 18
CONCLUSIONS
‘Alcohol culture’ is
complex
One impor...
The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 19
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The authors wish to acknowledge t...
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Development and Testing of a Conceptual Framework for Asking about Intoxication

Authors: Van Dyke, Nina; Lethborg, Anna L.; Allan, Julaine; Maddern, Christine M.; O’Rourke, Sean; Saleeba, Emma L.

VicHealth, as part of a Victorian Government initiative to reduce the alcohol and drug toll in Victoria, wanted to develop a measure of acceptability of intoxication in order to track the alcohol culture in Victoria. In order to do so, one must determine how to ask about intoxication. Most prior research either provides a definition of intoxication (e.g. 5 standard drinks on a single occasion; more than 2 standard drinks an hour), or else assumes that the term, ‘intoxication’ or ‘drunk’ is universally understood to mean a particular level of intoxication. However, both limited research and anecdotal evidence suggests that most people do not think about intoxication in these terms.

This paper discusses the development and initial testing of measures of acceptability of intoxication using a mixed methods approach.

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Development and Testing of a Conceptual Framework for Asking about Intoxication

  1. 1. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR ASKING ABOUT INTOXICATION: A MIXED METHODS APPROACH Presentation at the ACSPRI 2014 Social Science Methodology Conference, Sydney 10 Dec 2014 Dr Nina Van Dyke Director, Social Research Group
  2. 2. Long term goal Initial focus Target Objective This paper The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 2 PROJECT BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES
  3. 3. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 3 EXAMPLES OF EXTANT SURVEY QUESTIONS To what extent do you agree with the following statement – ‘It’s ok to get drunk’? (2009 Victorian Youth Alcohol and Drug Survey) How often on an occasion that you drink alcohol do you intend to get drunk? (Victorian Secondary School Students’ Use of Licit and Illicit Substances in 2011) How many times, if any, have you had the following number of alcoholic drinks on any one occasion when you have been drinking in the last 2 weeks? (11 or more; 7-10; 5-6) (Victorian Secondary School Students’ Use of Licit and Illicit Substances in 2011)
  4. 4. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 4 OVERVIEW OF METHODOLOGY Literature review Integrated groups Telephone survey
  5. 5. 5The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) QUALITATIVE RESEARCH
  6. 6. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 6 INTEGRATED GROUPS Qualitative Research
  7. 7. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 7 QUALITATIVE RESEARCH FINDINGS “I know I’ve had enough when I start slurring my words” [behaviour not consumption] “I’m a one pot screamer but my friend can drink like a fish” [consumption not accurate] “Call it tipsy, drunk or smashed – I’ll still have a hangover tomorrow” [different terms used] “Young people say they’re smashed when I’d say they were just a bit drunk” [terms differ by age group] “So you start out getting tipsy and then get loud & excited, slur your words, start losing your balance and so on” [stages of intoxication]
  8. 8. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 8 STAGES OF INTOXICATION Stage 1: Start to feel warm or flushed - most still able to drive [Tipsy – Happy] Stage 2: Have more energy/confidence - more chatty/excitable/loud [Excited – Drunk] Stage 3: May slur words, stumble or spill drinks - limited inhibitions [Drunk – Pissed] Stage 4: More prone to aggression/ emotional - actions may lead to regret [Pissed – Smashed – Trashed – Shitfaced] Stage 5: Unconscious/passed out - unable to stand/speak - vomiting [Blind – Wasted – Passed out]
  9. 9. 9The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH
  10. 10. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 10 SURVEY OVERVIEW o N= 1,392 o Age 16+ o Victoria o Interview length = 23.1 minutes o Response rate = 19.1% (completed/ potentially in-scope; RDD landline & mobile) SECTION TOPIC 1 Introduction/respondent selection 2 Alcohol attitudes and beliefs 3 Alcohol at events 4 Non-drinking 5 Own consumption 6 Definition of intoxication 7 Attitudes towards intoxication 8 Perception of others’ alcohol consumption and behaviours 9 Demographics
  11. 11. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 11 QUANT – NEW APPROACH TO ASKING ABOUT INTOXICATION Rate intoxication behaviours on 0 to 10 scale •On a scale from 0 to 10 where 0 means SOBER and 10 means PASSED OUT, how would you rate a person who’s… (READ OUT) •Starting to feel relaxed •Losing their inhibitions •Getting excited and noisy •Starting to slur their speech •Losing their balance •Head is spinning •Vomiting Choose own term for losing balance •You gave “losing balance” a rating of (INSERT NUMBER FROM SCALE) on that scale where 0 means SOBER and 10 means PASSED OUT. •What word would you use to describe this level of intoxication? In other words, if someone has drunk enough alcohol to be losing their balance, would you refer to them as ‘drunk’, ‘smashed’, ‘tipsy’, ‘pissed’, ‘wasted’, ‘inebriated’, ‘hammered’…or what word would you use? •RECORD TERM USED FOR LOSING BALANCE Answer acceptability of intoxication using chosen term •Getting [INSERT TERM USED FOR LOSING BALANCE] every now and then is not a problem. Do you… (READ OUT) •Strongly agree •Agree •(Neither agree nor disagree) •Disagree •Strongly disagree •(Don’t know) •(Refused)
  12. 12. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 12 RESULTS OF COGNITIVE TESTING • Understood and were comfortable • Better than asking about consumption • Better than using pre- determined terms such as ‘drunk’ or ‘intoxicated’
  13. 13. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 13 HOW WERE INTOXICATED BEHAVIOURS RATED? Sober Feeling relaxed Losing inhibitions Excited and noisy Slurred speech Head spinning Losing balance Vomiting Passed out
  14. 14. 14The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) DISCUSSION
  15. 15. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 15 DISCUSSION – NEED FOR MEASURES Shift the alcohol culture in Victoria  Important component is broad acceptability of intoxication  Needs (NEW) simple, accurate, valid measures Understand how Victorians think/talk about intoxication  Use this information to develop quantitative measures
  16. 16. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 16 DISCUSSION –NEW APPROACH Rate intoxication behaviours Provide term for ‘losing balance’ Insert term into questions about acceptability of intoxication This approach anchors personal perceptions of intoxication to an objectively identifiable behaviour consistently associated with a particular (high) level of intoxication.
  17. 17. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 17 LIMITATIONS OF THE RESEARCH Small sample size in qualitative component (67 participants of whom only 4 were 30 yrs+) Additional research to compare new versus traditional approach / measures Just 2 Victorian locations (Melbourne & Ballarat)
  18. 18. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 18 CONCLUSIONS ‘Alcohol culture’ is complex One important aspect is acceptance of intoxication Valid and reliable measures are needed We believe our new approach is superior to traditional approaches
  19. 19. The Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions Pty. Ltd.) 19 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors wish to acknowledge the support of: • Victorian Law Enforcement Development Fund (VLEDF) • Victorian Department of Health • Victorian Health Promotion Foundation (VicHealth) Dr Nina Van Dyke Social Research Group (a division of Market Solutions) nvandyke@marketsolutions.com.au

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