Agile 101

AGILE 101
Introduction to Agile Methodology
Traditional Project Management - Waterfall
Requirement
Design
Build
Test
Implement
Support
Waterfall Project Management - Drawbacks
■ Difficult to cater to changing requirements
■ Working software produced very late; lack of
customer feedback
■ Long delivery cycle; benefits are realized at the
end of project
■ Lack of collaboration between business and IT
■ Lack of flexibility in meeting changing business
needs
■ Difficult to measure progress within phases
Agile Project Management
Requirements
Design
Build
Test
Implement
Track and
Monitor
Waterfall vs Agile Project Management
Fixed
Scope
Est.
Cost
Quality
Est.
Schedule
Waterfall Agile
Waterfall vs Agile Project Management
Waterfall Agile
Architecture Fixed before build starts Informal and incremental
Integration At the end of test cycle Continuous
Skill level Specialized Cross functional
Management Project Manager as command and
control leader
Scrum Master as servant leader
Software delivery Single - At the end of the project Multiple - Iterative and incremental
Business interaction During requirement and UAT phases Throughout the project
Responsibility of delivery Project manager Development team
Benefits realization At the end of project Throughout the project
Risk of failure High Low
Agile Manifesto
Individuals and interactions Over Processes and tools
Working software Over Comprehensive documentation
Customer collaboration Over Contract negotiation
Responding to change Over Following a plan
While there is value in the items on the right,
we value the items on the left more.
Agile Principles
1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive
advantage.
3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter
timescale.
4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.
5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the
job done.
6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face
conversation.
7. Working software is the primary measure of progress.
8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a
constant pace indefinitely.
9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
10. Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential.
11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.
12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.
Agile Frameworks
Scrum
• Enables a small, cross-
functional, self-managing
team to deliver fast
Kanban
• Improves speed and quality
of delivery by increasing
visibility of work in progress,
and limiting multi-tasking
Scrumban
• Limits work in progress like
Kanban with Scrum
ceremonies such as Daily
standup
Lean
• Streamlines and eliminates
waste to deliver more with
less
XP (Extreme
Programming)
• Develop robustly to ensure
quality
Agile Frameworks
• Testing and product showcase is integrated into the cycleHigher Product Quality
• Product owner is always involved
• Customer feedback is incorporated with frequent releases
Improved Customer Satisfaction
• Agile Ceremonies
• Use of BVIR,Transparency
Better Control and Monitoring
• Incremental delivery of working software ensures product works as
per customer needsReduced Risk of Failure
• Benefits are realized early by releasing working software
incrementallyFaster ROI
• Self-organizing team allows people to feel empowered as
compared to be commandedHigherTeam Morale
• Only high priority features and stories are worked on avoiding
unwanted scopeReduced Waste
Common misconception of Agile
Unplanned and
unstructured
No
documentation
is required
Not a disciplined
approach
Development is
not predictable
Not meant for
large and
complex projects
Doesn’t work for
distributed
teams
No design
required
Agile 101
1 sur 12

Recommandé

Agile 101Agile 101
Agile 101beLithe
29.2K vues36 diapositives
Agile 101Agile 101
Agile 101Bill McGehee
3.1K vues87 diapositives
Agile 101Agile 101
Agile 101Sunil Mundra
2.4K vues32 diapositives
Agile OverviewAgile Overview
Agile OverviewStephen Albright
2.4K vues27 diapositives
Agile Project ManagementAgile Project Management
Agile Project ManagementSyed Zaid Irshad
3.8K vues54 diapositives

Contenu connexe

Tendances(20)

Agile scrum fundamentalsAgile scrum fundamentals
Agile scrum fundamentals
Deniz Gungor1.7K vues
Agile MethodologyAgile Methodology
Agile Methodology
Betclic Everest Group Tech Team2.3K vues
Agile introductionAgile introduction
Agile introduction
Martin Nymann Vinther827 vues
Agile FundamentalsAgile Fundamentals
Agile Fundamentals
Dennis Stevens11.1K vues
Agile SimplifiedAgile Simplified
Agile Simplified
Walaa Atef5.9K vues
Agile Project ManagementAgile Project Management
Agile Project Management
Abdullah Khan5K vues
Scrum in 15 MinutesScrum in 15 Minutes
Scrum in 15 Minutes
Serge Rehem12.1K vues
What Is Agile ScrumWhat Is Agile Scrum
What Is Agile Scrum
Michael Bourque7.9K vues
Agile Transformation v1.27Agile Transformation v1.27
Agile Transformation v1.27
LeadingAgile7.5K vues
Scrum - Agile MethodologyScrum - Agile Methodology
Scrum - Agile Methodology
Niel Deckx5.1K vues
Agile Metrics...That MatterAgile Metrics...That Matter
Agile Metrics...That Matter
Erik Weber3K vues
Agile MethodologyAgile Methodology
Agile Methodology
Aciron Consulting2.4K vues
12 Benefits of Adopting Agile 12 Benefits of Adopting Agile
12 Benefits of Adopting Agile
VersionOne2.3K vues
Practical Guide to ScrumPractical Guide to Scrum
Practical Guide to Scrum
Pavel Dabrytski29K vues

Similaire à Agile 101(20)

Agile project management using scrumAgile project management using scrum
Agile project management using scrum
PrudentialSolutions3.3K vues
The case for coaching-NorwichThe case for coaching-Norwich
The case for coaching-Norwich
Ryan Lockard325 vues
Agile principles & cultureAgile principles & culture
Agile principles & culture
Raymond Baziwane1.1K vues
Agile project management PMI-ACPAgile project management PMI-ACP
Agile project management PMI-ACP
EVOLVE for Instructors Materials97 vues
Agile Testing Agile Testing
Agile Testing
Shuchi Singla AKT,SPC4,PMI-ACP,ITIL(F),CP-AAT1.4K vues
Agile Development OverviewAgile Development Overview
Agile Development Overview
guestb4c7702.2K vues
Using Agile in the ClassroomUsing Agile in the Classroom
Using Agile in the Classroom
Cindy Royal6.4K vues
Agile Development OverviewAgile Development Overview
Agile Development Overview
Mark Kovacevich381 vues
When to use agile (PMI ACP)When to use agile (PMI ACP)
When to use agile (PMI ACP)
Davis Thomas356 vues
Agile Project DevelopmentAgile Project Development
Agile Project Development
Hajrah Jahan236 vues
Fundamentals of AgileFundamentals of Agile
Fundamentals of Agile
Zülfikar Karakaya618 vues
Agile webinar pack (2)Agile webinar pack (2)
Agile webinar pack (2)
Basis Technologies816 vues
Agile+Slides.pdfAgile+Slides.pdf
Agile+Slides.pdf
ShravanThangallapall62 vues
Introduction to Agile MethodsIntroduction to Agile Methods
Introduction to Agile Methods
Richard Cheng878 vues
Introduction to Scrum.pptIntroduction to Scrum.ppt
Introduction to Scrum.ppt
Mohan Late63.6K vues
Agile dashboardAgile dashboard
Agile dashboard
Fadi Stephan6.7K vues

Agile 101

  • 1. AGILE 101 Introduction to Agile Methodology
  • 2. Traditional Project Management - Waterfall Requirement Design Build Test Implement Support
  • 3. Waterfall Project Management - Drawbacks ■ Difficult to cater to changing requirements ■ Working software produced very late; lack of customer feedback ■ Long delivery cycle; benefits are realized at the end of project ■ Lack of collaboration between business and IT ■ Lack of flexibility in meeting changing business needs ■ Difficult to measure progress within phases
  • 5. Waterfall vs Agile Project Management Fixed Scope Est. Cost Quality Est. Schedule Waterfall Agile
  • 6. Waterfall vs Agile Project Management Waterfall Agile Architecture Fixed before build starts Informal and incremental Integration At the end of test cycle Continuous Skill level Specialized Cross functional Management Project Manager as command and control leader Scrum Master as servant leader Software delivery Single - At the end of the project Multiple - Iterative and incremental Business interaction During requirement and UAT phases Throughout the project Responsibility of delivery Project manager Development team Benefits realization At the end of project Throughout the project Risk of failure High Low
  • 7. Agile Manifesto Individuals and interactions Over Processes and tools Working software Over Comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration Over Contract negotiation Responding to change Over Following a plan While there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.
  • 8. Agile Principles 1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. 2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. 3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. 4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. 5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. 6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. 7. Working software is the primary measure of progress. 8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. 9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. 10. Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. 11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. 12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.
  • 9. Agile Frameworks Scrum • Enables a small, cross- functional, self-managing team to deliver fast Kanban • Improves speed and quality of delivery by increasing visibility of work in progress, and limiting multi-tasking Scrumban • Limits work in progress like Kanban with Scrum ceremonies such as Daily standup Lean • Streamlines and eliminates waste to deliver more with less XP (Extreme Programming) • Develop robustly to ensure quality
  • 10. Agile Frameworks • Testing and product showcase is integrated into the cycleHigher Product Quality • Product owner is always involved • Customer feedback is incorporated with frequent releases Improved Customer Satisfaction • Agile Ceremonies • Use of BVIR,Transparency Better Control and Monitoring • Incremental delivery of working software ensures product works as per customer needsReduced Risk of Failure • Benefits are realized early by releasing working software incrementallyFaster ROI • Self-organizing team allows people to feel empowered as compared to be commandedHigherTeam Morale • Only high priority features and stories are worked on avoiding unwanted scopeReduced Waste
  • 11. Common misconception of Agile Unplanned and unstructured No documentation is required Not a disciplined approach Development is not predictable Not meant for large and complex projects Doesn’t work for distributed teams No design required