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FY 2015ANNUAL REPORT
Fairfax County
Office for Women
&Domestic and Sexual
Violence Services
Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services
WE BELIEVE everyone has a right to live free of violence.
WE ENVI...
Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services
The Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services
(OFW...
Advocacy Services
ADVOCACY SERVICES
In FY 2015, Advocacy Services included two Court Specialists, one Intake
Coordinator, ...
Artemis House
ARTEMIS HOUSE, 24-HOUR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CRISIS SHELTER
The Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence ...
Community Engagement
By encouraging all of Fairfax County to participate in the work of ending violence,
the Community Eng...
Community Engagement
“Respect uR d8,” a prevention program for youth, continues to educate and
engage. Students at several...
Coordinated Community Response
COORDINATED COMMUNITY RESPONSE
The County-wide Domestic Violence Coordinator facilitates co...
Coordinated Community Response
9
OFWDSVS offers counseling services for survivors of sexual and/
or domestic violence, stalking, teen dating violence, and ...
Domestic Violence Action Center
Located at the Historic Courthouse in Fairfax City, DVAC is a
comprehensive, co-located se...
People call the Domestic and Sexual Violence hotline for many reasons from
looking for resources to accessing a sympatheti...
Offender Services
The Offender Services team of the Office for Women & Domestic
and Sexual Violence Services provides the ...
Top 10 Accomplishments of OFWDSVS 2015
Enhancing the ability of the Coordinated Services Planning helpline call takers
to ...
Top 10 Accomplishments of OFWDSVS 2015
Implementation of the Partners’ Portal to improve the administration of the 24-
hou...
FY 2015
ADAPT Clients16
FY 2015
Counseling Services Clients 17
FY 2015
DVAC Clients18
FY 2015
Hotline Callers 19
Fairfax County is committed to nondiscrimination in all county programs, services and
activities. Reasonable accommodation...
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FY 2015 Office for Women and Domestic and Sexual Violence Services Annual Report

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FY 2015 Office for Women and Domestic and Sexual Violence Services Annual Report

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FY 2015 Office for Women and Domestic and Sexual Violence Services Annual Report

  1. 1. FY 2015ANNUAL REPORT Fairfax County Office for Women &Domestic and Sexual Violence Services
  2. 2. Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services WE BELIEVE everyone has a right to live free of violence. WE ENVISION a day when all forms of interpersonal violence and oppression are not tolerated and when individuals and families, no matter their situation, have access to and are welcomed into a wide variety of services that allow them to rebuild their lives on their own terms. WE ADVANCE our mission of preventing and ending domestic and sexual violence, stalking, and human trafficking by fostering a community based on equality and mutual respect through prevention and intervention, community engagement and awareness, policy and advocacy. WE VALUE • Collaboration, as we strive to open doors in order to build relationships and engage the community in providing the highest quality of care and promoting social change; • Compassion, as we commit to providing empathetic, client- driven, and trauma-informed services for our community; • Courage, as we support our clients and members of our community as they take difficult and courageous steps toward autonomy, accountability, and responsibility; • Equality, as we promote human equality and use resources in ways that serve the public equitably and as we respectfully challenge biases, attitudes, and behaviors that contribute to inequality; • Innovation,aswefosteranenvironmentthatembracescreativity and calculated risk-taking to advance our mission; and • Safety, as we advocate for safety as a basic human right which underscores each and every interaction with clients and the community, as we assure confidential, accessible, and affordable services to all. 2
  3. 3. Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services The Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services (OFWDSVS) works in the community with those who have been affected by domestic and sexual violence, stalking, and human trafficking. OFWDSVS is a full-service program that supports victims in creating safer lives, and also works with offenders to find alternatives to abusive behaviors. Services are provided in many locations throughout Fairfax County including Artemis House, the 24-hour domestic violence crisis shelter for those fleeing abuse; and the Domestic Violence Action Center, a County-Community partnership providing a variety of domestic violence services at a single site location. Services provided include: • 24-hour hotline for domestic and sexual violence, stalking, and trafficking. 703-360-7273, TTY 711 • Individual and group counseling for women, men, teens, and children by professionally trained counselors. • Advocacy services, especially for court-related issues and housing and economic needs. • Referrals and help linking to the services of other agencies and organizations. • ADAPT, Anger and Domestic Abuse Prevention and Treatment, a program for offenders who wish to change their abusive behaviors. • Hospital accompaniment, when requested, for victims of sexual and/or domestic violence who are accessing forensic exams. • Violence prevention and education programs for community groups, schools, or any interested parties. • Consultation and training for professionals. • Crisis sheltering for those fleeing domestic violence situations in collaboration with Shelter House Inc. 123volunteers provided 9,649hours of services to OFWDSVS at a value of $236,304 A man reflecting on his experience as a volunteer: “There is such a need! That has been the biggest surprise for me, especially since I’ve lived my whole life in Fairfax County. I had no idea that such an affluent county had such issues. You all at the Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services do such important work and there is such a need, that I see the value in passing out flyers or making buttons or setting up an event. I’m just happy and honored that I can help in some small way because there is such a need.”3
  4. 4. Advocacy Services ADVOCACY SERVICES In FY 2015, Advocacy Services included two Court Specialists, one Intake Coordinator, and one Housing and Economic Specialist. These advocates from OFWDSVS are located in the Historic Courthouse at the County’s DomesticViolenceActionCenterknownasDVAC(seepage11). Wewere able to increase our Court Specialists by half a position this year with a grant from the Virginia Department of Social Services, which helped significantly to cover our 126% increase in court accompaniments since last year. It is the goal of Advocacy Services to increase client safety through knowledge and understanding of available resources and options. Clients are supported by advocates in accessing appropriate resources. The OFWDSVS community-based advocates provide confidential, holistic services including safety planning, crisis intervention, options counseling, education on the civil and criminal justice systems, emotional support, and a variety of referrals based on the client’s individual needs. The advocates also accompany clients to civil and criminal court hearings. Working within the empowerment model, advocates seek to preserve the client’s right to self-determination. The Housing and Economic Specialist (HES) specifically assists victims who are seeking housing and economic support services by providing information on housing options, determining how much rent they can afford, and making referrals to shelter and housing location services. Economic supports include helping clients learn how to develop and maintain a budget, understanding how to read a credit report to learn how it impacts obtaining housing and financial assistance, and applying for rental and household assistance. OFWDSVS’ collaboration with the Community Housing Resource Program (CHRP) continues to expand resources and enhance direct services to victims of violence by helping to secure safe and stable housing resources. Remarks from a client after working with an advocate: “Thank you very much. I couldn’t have faced the judge if it wasn’t for your support. I feel better knowing that you’re here with me.” Thank you from a client: “Thank you for all the help you’ve given me in some of the most difficult times in my life. Your accompaniment to all the court hearings, your support and collaboration with all the information has served as a support for me to keep going and not feel alone. You can’t imagine how much I appreciate all of this.” 607 CLIENTS SERVED 42% 58% Consultations Housing & Economic, 461 Court, 525 4
  5. 5. Artemis House ARTEMIS HOUSE, 24-HOUR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CRISIS SHELTER The Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services contracts with Shelter House, Inc., a local community non-profit, to manage Artemis House. Clients at Artemis House are provided safe and secure shelter at a non-disclosed location in Fairfax County. Shelter is provided for women, men, and children who are fleeing from domestic violence in their homes. This year 364 clients were served at Artemis House, a 41% increase over the past year. Sadly, 228 families were turned away due to the lack of shelter space. During FY 2015, under the leadership of Van Metre Homes and Home Design Elements, HomeAid took on the project of renovating an older home that is part of the Artemis House shelter system. By renovating the basement, HomeAid volunteers were able to create a third bedroom and add another full bathroom. New cabinets, countertops, floors, and appliances in the kitchen make the space more useable and inviting. They also added new wood flooring and carpets and fresh paint to the interior of the house. The outside was spruced up and a fence installed so families could enjoy the outdoors in safety and privacy. Many thanks to HomeAid and its industry partners for giving our families a beautiful and welcoming space to begin the process of rebuilding their lives. CLIENTS SERVED: 163 ADULTS, 201 CHILDREN Upon exiting from Artemis House, a client said, “Thank you so very much for all your help and kindness provided to me and my daughter during our stay. It is still a very difficult situation. However, you were always there supporting us as much as you could. Please extend my appreciation and say ‘thank you’ to everyone. I’m never ever going to forget all you did for us.” A client who was helped at Artemis House said, “It is hard to imagine where I would be by now if I wasn’t given protection, housing, food, therapy, legal help, and if I didn’t have anybody to listen to me and guide me through this most scary time of my life. As much as I loved being helped at the safe house, I hope not to come back there in the future, and I hope to prove to myself in the future that I am capable of not being a victim of domestic violence, and I hope to always feel safe and well-respected in the future.” 30% 16% 38% 13% 3% Client Demographics Caucasian Latino Black or African-American Asian Multiracial 5
  6. 6. Community Engagement By encouraging all of Fairfax County to participate in the work of ending violence, the Community Engagement team strives to increase the understanding of the dynamics of domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking, and sex trafficking. Believing that the more we know, the better we can respond, the Community Engagement team provides informative trainings, staffs resource tables, and distributes information to better inform residents and service providers on how to prevent interpersonal violence and how to intervene with those who have been affected by violence in their lives. The Community Engagement team is responsible for prevention and awareness programs, coordinates staff and volunteers to cover the 24-hour Hotline and Lethality Assessment Program line, and recruits and trains volunteers to assist staff in every facet of the work we do. Awareness Months In October, Domestic Violence Awareness Month, or DVAM, focused on the theme “No More Violence” as we honored the 20th anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). David Bobzien, Chair of the Fairfax County Domestic Violence Policy, Prevention, and Coordinating Council spoke and accepted the Board of Supervisors’ proclamation on behalf of the community. Lynn Rosenthal, White House Advisor on Violence Against Women, spoke at the third annual DV Community meeting. OFWDSVS also sponsored a resource fair at Inova Fairfax Hospital with the goal of engaging the medical community around domestic violence awareness. In February, OFWDSVS once again sponsored a successful art competition for TeenDatingViolenceAwarenessMonth.Entrantsusingdifferentmediapresented original and affecting works around this theme. Carmen Vargas, founder of the Chantilly Youth Group Foundation that works with youth by supporting healthy lifestyles and relationships, accepted the Board of Supervisors’ proclamation on behalf of the community. In April, Sexual Assault Awareness Month, or SAAM, began with a proclamation focusing on the issues of sexual violence among teens and young adults. Dr. Angel Cabrera, President of George Mason University and member of the Governor’s Task Force on Sexual Assault, accepted the Board of Supervisors’ proclamation on behalf of the community. Later in the month, a community walk to “Stop the Silence, End the Violence” was held on the grounds of the Fairfax County Government Center. The event was kicked off by speeches from Supervisor John Cook and Deputy County Executive Patricia Harrison. The walk concluded in the lower level of the Government Center where community partners offered a resource fair. “I learned from the OFWDSVS volunteer coordinator about the different volunteer opportunities at an outreach event. She contacted me the following day and that gave me a positive feeling. I attended the volunteer orientation and learned about the work the office does in the community, and I believe in the mission of this office. It looks at the problem in its entirety. I love coming every week to the office, I enjoy what I do and Amy and Jen keep me busy. It is a great fit!” -Front Desk Volunteer 6
  7. 7. Community Engagement “Respect uR d8,” a prevention program for youth, continues to educate and engage. Students at several middle, high, and alternative schools and also at teen and community centers in Fairfax County participate in the six-week program that focuses on healthy relationships, dating violence, gender equality, and media literacy. The interactive sessions challenge youth and give them the tools to build communication and interpersonal skills and develop understanding to create positive relationships. Volunteers are an essential part of all OFWDSVS programs. To increase participation and engagement, special efforts were made this year to develop opportunities for volunteers that included one-time and short-term activities, as well as on-going commitments. In particular, volunteers were encouraged to help with community outreach events such as staffing tables at community fairs and helping with awareness month projects. The number of volunteer hours worked increased by 17% as volunteers provided services valued at nearly a quarter of a million dollars. Without volunteers and interns, OFWDSVS would not be able to reach as many as we do in Fairfax County. The Safe Zone symbol is a message for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals and their allies in Fairfax County to show that the OFWDSVS is supportive of all individuals, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. This symbol signifies that our staff members are knowledgeable, supportive, and trustworthy regarding issues faced by the LGBTQ community. With this symbol we hope to grow awareness within the LGBTQ community to consider OFWDSVS as an ally and become more open to seek our services. “The Respect uR d8 program was very interesting and showed me what to look for in a relationship so I can recognize abuse if it happens to me.” - Student from Lee HS “The Respect uR d8 masculinity class really got me thinking. I never realized all the expectaions on men to fit in or ‘be a man’. I also always thought it was wrong for men to cry but now I understand that we are all equal.” - Student from Fairfax HS 7 Training, 31 Events 15% Education, 109 Programs 54% Outreach, 62 Events 31% Events and Programs Presented
  8. 8. Coordinated Community Response COORDINATED COMMUNITY RESPONSE The County-wide Domestic Violence Coordinator facilitates connections among the various service providers in Fairfax County by helping to form bridges and alliances among the many diverse agencies and organizations working to meet the needs of those affected by domestic and sexual violence and stalking in our community. In providing the structures and opportunities for collaborative work, the County-wide DV Coordinator ensures that the comprehensive services of many partners in our community are engaged to expand the reach and effectiveness of all of our work. Some of the many achievements that were realized in FY 2015 because of this coordinated response include the work of the Domestic Violence Network. The DV Network’s 20-hour Tier One training provides a basic understanding of the dynamics of domestic and sexual violence issues and stalking. As of the end of FY 2015, Tier One training has educated 518 people. Tier Two trainings focus on advanced professional training. During FY 2015, Tier Two trainings included topics such as Polyvictimization, The Use of Storytelling in Our Work, and Understanding Forced Marriage. In 2014, a full-time family law fellowship position to serve moderate-income victims of domestic violence was developed by several partners in the domestic violence community. Over the past year, the Dunn-Chadwick Fellow served moderate-income clients who would otherwise have gone unrepresented in their custody and other family law cases. TheCounty-wideDVCoordinatorfacilitatestheFairfaxCountyDomesticViolence Fatality Review Team (DVFRT) which this year expanded its membership to include an immigration lawyer from Ayuda and a representative from the Fairfax County Public Schools. A recommendation from the DVFRT has been realized in the creation of the Lethality Assessment Program and partnership (see page 15). The County-wide DV Coordinator also works to create collaboration across the Metro DC region, statewide, nationally, and internationally. The Coordinator serves on the VA Sexual & Domestic Violence Action Alliance Policy (legislative) Committee and the Department of Criminal Justice Services’ (DCJS) Statewide Homicide Reduction Team. This year she presented at the DCJS Homicide Reduction Conference; trained advocates and professionals from across the world at Quantico; provided technical assistance and training to Loudoun County and the District of Columbia on Fatality Review Team development; and presented at the 2015 National Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative Conference in Florida. 8
  9. 9. Coordinated Community Response 9
  10. 10. OFWDSVS offers counseling services for survivors of sexual and/ or domestic violence, stalking, teen dating violence, and human trafficking to adults, teens, and children free of charge. Services are offered to both female and male victims and, where appropriate, to families. Clients are provided up to 10 weeks of individual counseling with service providers who are specially trained to deal with the trauma around these issues. Consultation is also provided to parents of children impacted by domestic violence. To serve more people and to foster social connections, group counseling sessions are also offered, including specific groups for women experiencing domestic violence, for female survivors of sexual violence, and for men who were sexually abused as children. Counseling groups have grown in number and popularity over the past year. 340 CLIENTS SERVED 98% of clients reported at least one specific way they are better off as a result of at least one specific aspect of counseling services received (such as feeling safer, better coping after trauma, and new hope for the future). “A better sense of wellbeing; my worth. There is a light at the end of the dark and gloomy tunnel. The counselor has done more for me than any therapist has. I was able to get in touch with my real emotions.” -Counseling Client “My daughter is able to communicate her emotions better. She has looked forward to every appointment with the counselor since she met him. She has opened up more, is more vocal in expressing herself whether it is about positive or negativefeelings. Counselor was/is very patient with my daughter. Very caring, understanding, and extremely knowledgeable. He has helped her face and deal with the trauma of witnessing abuse. We are grateful to the counselor and his hard work and patience. He was accommodating to my work schedule and was available to talk whenever I needed to reach him.” - Mother of Counseling Client Counseling 10% 60% 27% 3% Client Demographics 0-17 years old 18-39 years old 40-59 years old 60+ years old 10
  11. 11. Domestic Violence Action Center Located at the Historic Courthouse in Fairfax City, DVAC is a comprehensive, co-located service center staffed by county agency and community non-profit partners created to provided culturally responsive information and support services for victims of domestic violence, sexual violence, and stalking and their families, as well as to provide accountability for offenders of these crimes through specialized prosecution and offender supervision. The Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services continues the commitment to on-site coordination of the project by assigning staff and a supervisor to the DVAC project. In October 2014, the DVAC project was awarded a second continuation of funding from the U.S. Department of Justice. The DVAC collaborative effort includes the Fairfax County Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney, Court Services Unit of the Fairfax County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court, Fairfax County Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services, Fairfax County Police Department, A Way Forward, Ayuda, Jewish Coalition Against Domestic Abuse, Legal Services of Northern Virginia, Northern Virginia Family Service, Shelter House, Inc., Tahirih Justice Center, and The Women’s Center. In FY 2015, the DVAC partners welcomed a new partner, the Jewish Coalition Against Domestic Abuse, or JCADA, which provides on-site counseling one day per week. Also in FY 2015, Northern Virginia Family Service, an original DVAC partner, began on-site counseling services one day a week. Comments from DVAC Clients: “Thank you very much, I could not face the judge if it wasn’t for your support, I feel better knowing that you’re here with me.” “I liked being able to talk to an advocate right away for safety planning. It was very helpful.” “She helped me before at the shelter. I was surprised to see her at the court. I’m glad she was there because she knows me and I didn’t have to tell everything again.” “Thank you for listening & speaking with me. It’s so much easier to speak to someone who speaks the same language & it’s not the same when you speak with an interpreter. They don’t always understand everything you are trying to say.” “Wonderful service provided by Fairfax County. Please continue with this much needed service.” 917 CLIENTS SERVED 34% 6% 10% 15% 35% Client Demographics Caucasian Asian Middle Eastern Black or African American Hispanic/Latino 11
  12. 12. People call the Domestic and Sexual Violence hotline for many reasons from looking for resources to accessing a sympathetic ear. While some callers’ needs are immediate, others are calling to ask about resources for planning or to talk about past issues with violence. From 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., our hotline is answered by agency staff or trained volunteers. Artemis House, our County’s crisis domestic violence shelter, answers the hotline during the overnight hours. Either way, when someone calls our hotline at 703-360-7273, they can be assured of a locally- based, empathic, knowledgeable, well-trained, and supportive person who will listen to their situations, understand their needs, and work with them to find answers. Toimprovetheoperationofthehotlineoverthepastyear,wedevelopedaPartners Portal as a single website for information, resources, and schedules for those answering the hotline. The site, which can be accessed by staff and volunteers, has been invaluable as a communication tool and resource repository. Also this year, we worked closely with our community partners at the Fairfax County Police Department, FCPD Victim Services Section, Office of the Commonwealth’s Attorney, Artemis House, and Bethany House to develop a Lethality Assessment Program or LAP for our community. With the goal of making an immediate connection with a victim when police respond to a domestic violence call, the idea is to connect a victim with someone who will help with safety planning and options counseling for immediate needs while also arranging to connect that victim to a community advocate who will provide help and support afterwards. In this way, we hope to reach people sooner with valuable, lifesaving support. Hotline 703-360-7273 While answering the hotline, a staff person spoke with a woman who had been beaten by her husband the previous night. The call taker was able to help the woman assess her level of danger, engage in planning for her safety, and talk through options for what to do next. The caller decided to go to the hospital to have her injuries checked and documented, so she could then work with the police to have her husband arrested. The call taker was able to give the caller concrete and useable information and to link her with other service providers who could help with her next steps. We received 1,476calls seeking service and information 3 out of 4calls to the hotline are related to domestic violence 12
  13. 13. Offender Services The Offender Services team of the Office for Women & Domestic and Sexual Violence Services provides the Anger and Domestic Abuse Prevention and Treatment, or ADAPT program. ADAPT’s 18- week psychoeducational groups are offered in English and Spanish to perpetrators of domestic or family violence who are first time offenders, many of whom have been ordered by the court to participate in the program. Based on the innovative treatment model, “Core Values Workshop,” initially developed by Dr. Steven Stosny, ADAPT works with clients in gender-mixed classes where clients are taught compassion for themselves and others as they also confront their abusive behaviors, take responsibility for their actions and learn how to eliminate violent behaviors in the future. In FY 2015, Offender Services sponsored a panel discussion with former clients of the program who spoke about their experiences of change during and after the ADAPT program. 100% of clients completing ADAPT accepted responsibility for past abuse 100% of clients completing ADAPT showed significant changes in their attitudes and behaviors that will lead to a reduction of violent behaviors in the future “I am a much happier person and realize I made many mistakes and now have the tools to not make them again. While it has helped open the door with my family, I have a long way to go to rebuild what I have destroyed.” -Male, 54 years old “It’s hard to put into words but I have this over- all feeling of self-control. I’m more compassionate and thoughtful of the other person’s feelings. I’m more considerate. All the knowledge I gained has improved my parenting and all of my relationships.” -Female, 30 years old 80% 20% ADAPT Completion Completed the ADAPT program (168 participants) Were unable to complete the ADAPT program (52 participants) 13
  14. 14. Top 10 Accomplishments of OFWDSVS 2015 Enhancing the ability of the Coordinated Services Planning helpline call takers to screen callers for domestic violence The Advocacy team and the County-wide Domestic Violence Coordinator partnered with Coordinated Services Planning (CSP) to train call takers on the CSP helpline to screen callers for domestic violence. In addition to their basic needs being met through CSP intervention, these callers are then connected with a domestic violence advocate who can help them begin to address the violence in their lives. Creation of a Children’s Counselor position for children who have been affected by domestic violence in their homes Using grant funds from the Va. Dept. of Social Services, we were able to fund a counselor to work with children affected by domestic violence. In FY 2014, the Domestic Violence Policy, Planning, and Coordinating Council (DVPPCC) identified services for children as a top priority need in the community. The addition of this position to our counseling team means we are able to begin meeting this need. First annual “Stop the Silence; End the Violence” walk to raise awareness of sexual violence issues Approximately 130 people, including members of the Board of Supervisors, Deputy County Executive, community partners, and County residents took part in a walk on the grounds of the Government Center. Volunteers and staff lined the trail with posters displaying facts and statistics about sexual violence. The walk ended indoors at a resource fair that focused on services offered throughout the county and neighboring jurisdictions. Creation of a Wellness Group for Spanish-speaking residents in South County Partnering with the Department of Family Services Domestic Violence Unit, staff from the Department of Neighborhood and Community Services, and the Sequoyah Community Center, OFWDSVS created a wellness group for Latina residents in South County. The group focused on the promotion of physical and emotional wellness and gave rise to a group to support survivors of domestic violence. Expanded internship program with Counseling and Offender Services teams To meet increasing demand for counseling services for both victims and offenders, the Counseling and Offender Services teams took on more interns to increase capacity and reduce the time it took for new clients to begin services. Masters level interns studying social work, psychology, and counseling received supervision from professionally licensed staff while providing quality services to clients in our programs. 14
  15. 15. Top 10 Accomplishments of OFWDSVS 2015 Implementation of the Partners’ Portal to improve the administration of the 24- hour hotline Tapping into existing County web technology, OFWDSVS developed a secure portal for volunteers and staff who operate the 24-hour domestic and sexual violence hotline to easily access schedules, personnel lists, resources, and forms. Making all information available in one place means that updates and changes need to be made only through one location. This process has maximized effective communications among staff and volunteers. Continued participation in regional and statewide work OFWDSVS continues as a strong voice in statewide and regional collaborative efforts. Staff participated in initiatives including implementing statewide accreditation standards, work with the Public Policy committee of the VA Domestic & Sexual Violence Action Alliance, and representation on the state advisory panel to develop recommendations for the state DV/SV hotline. Regional work to mark domestic and sexual violence awareness months included partnering with programs in Northern Virginia, DC, and Maryland. The Domestic Violence Community Annual Meeting kicked off Domestic Violence Awareness Month With the theme of “How Far We’ve Come: Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA),” the third annual meeting was attended by over 250 people and featured remarks from Lynn Rosenthal, White House Advisor on Violence Against Women. The morning meeting also included a Breakfast with the Judges, a Year-in-Review, and the Annual Awards for various service providers and allied professionals. Development of partners and protocols for the Lethality Assessment Program With our community partners: Fairfax County Police (FCPD), Victim Services Section of FCPD, Domestic Violence Action Center (DVAC), Shelter House, Inc., and Bethany House, we developed policies and procedures to implement the potentially life-saving Lethality Assessment Program (LAP) in Fairfax County. Plans were made for training police and advocates, protocols for record-keeping were developed, and a timeline for implementation, which began on July 1, was set. RevitalizationoftheCommissionforWomen TheCommission’saccomplishments included Fairfax County’s first Human Trafficking Awareness Month proclamation; formation of a CFW Student Advisory Group, the only one if its kind in the nation; publication of a domestic violence in the workplace brochure; creation of two videos on suffragists with Channel 16; celebrating Women’s History Month with a reception and proclamation; and partnering in a new alliance with other regional Commissions for Women. 15
  16. 16. FY 2015 ADAPT Clients16
  17. 17. FY 2015 Counseling Services Clients 17
  18. 18. FY 2015 DVAC Clients18
  19. 19. FY 2015 Hotline Callers 19
  20. 20. Fairfax County is committed to nondiscrimination in all county programs, services and activities. Reasonable accommodations will be provided upon request. To request this information in an alternate format, call 703-324-5730; TTY 703-324-5706. A Fairfax County, VA. publication. January 2015 Fairfax County Government Center 12000 Government Center Parkway Suite 339, Fairfax, VA 22035 703-324-5730 • TTY 703-324-5706 www.fairfaxcounty.gov/ofw Fairfax County Office for Women &Domestic and Sexual Violence Services

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