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The velvet Rope -

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This is a talk about how we occasionally exclude people from using our websites and mobile applications despite following accessibility guidelines. If we focus on people over technology and use the Inclusive Design Principles to help us do this we can deliver thoughtful an inclusive websites and applications.

Publié dans : Internet
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The velvet Rope -

  1. 1. The velvet rope Henny Swan @iheni
  2. 2. Message from the management If you identify as one of the following we ask that you leave the auditorium with immediate affect: Blind, low vision, colour blind, wear glasses, has chronic pain, limited dexterity, no upper body movement, are deaf, hard of hearing, have dyslexia, struggle with reading, have a cognitive impairment, RSI, use a mobile, forgot your headphones, use pinch zoom, are under 4 years old, over 70, have vertigo, feel anxious, depressed, panicky, hung-over, or drunk…
  3. 3. • Behind every great site or application lies thought, empathy and inclusion. This doesn’t happen by accident, it happens by design.
  4. 4. InclusiveDesignPrinciples.org
  5. 5. James Williamson Lynda.com author Simpleprimate.com Husband and Dad ALS
  6. 6. Visible labels ✓ Programmatically accessible labels ✓ Sufficient colour contrast ✓ Passes WCAG ✓ Usable ✗
  7. 7. The most frustrating input issue is not being able to see my password as I type. Whether I’m using voice dictation or a single finger…precise input is extremely difficult. This difficulty is increased when you introduce special characters…found in passwords. - James Williamson
  8. 8. •Control • People should be able to access and interact with content in their preferred way.
  9. 9. Show password
  10. 10. •Sam • Loves games and TV • Uses a tablet in portrait • Quadriplegic
  11. 11. • Fixed orientation • Not part of WCAG 2.0 • Part of WCAG 2.1
  12. 12. Jonny Taylor Punk rock Likes to go to gigs Wicked sense of humour Quadriplegic
  13. 13. Choice Consider providing different ways for people to complete tasks, especially those that are complex or non standard.
  14. 14. Swipe to delete items Edit mode to delete items
  15. 15. • Matt • Accessibility Engineer • Karaoke lover • Has low vision • Uses magnification
  16. 16. Panning and scrolling are the necessary evils of screen-magnification. The physical and cognitive load of being zoomed in to a small area of the overall screen presents bigger barriers than you might think. It’s tiring, and easy to get lost, or miss important content because it’s in an unexpected area of the overall screen. - Challenges, opportunities and the potential for low-vision access, Matt Tylee Atkinson
  17. 17. • Priority • Help users focus on core tasks, features, and information by prioritising them within the content and layout.
  18. 18. Colin late 60’s Retired Likes soaps Uses catch up Blind Screen reader user
  19. 19. •Consistency • Use familiar conventions and apply them consistently.
  20. 20. Amazon
  21. 21. Lucy Lives on a boat Tech savvy Is fearless Losing her sight
  22. 22. •Situation • People use your interface in different situations. Make sure your interface delivers a valuable experience to people regardless of their circumstances.
  23. 23. Camera API
  24. 24. Patricia First female president of ABC Sports Hates having her photo taken Fibromyalgia
  25. 25. Value Consider the value of features and how they improve the experience for different users.
  26. 26. Geolocation API Camera and voice API Touch ID Casting
  27. 27. Karo Photographer Poet Low vision Victor Musician Techie No vision
  28. 28. It can be difficult today to visualise the building as it looked a hundred years ago, but as we follow the tour, imagine the rooms with their royal furniture and ornaments removed, and with lino covering the floors, and boards protecting the walls. You’ll have the opportunity to see photos of the Pavilion during its time as a hospital throughout our tour. www.brightonmuseums.org
  29. 29. It can be difficult today to visualise the building as it looked a hundred years ago, but as we follow the tour, imagine the rooms with their royal furniture and ornaments removed, and with lino covering the floors, and boards protecting the walls. You’ll have the opportunity to see photos of the Pavilion during its time as a hospital throughout our tour. www.brightonmuseums.org
  30. 30. •Comparable experience • Ensure your interface provides a comparable experience for all so people can accomplish tasks in a way that suits their needs without undermining the quality of the content.
  31. 31. alt="Three hot air balloons hang together in a calm, sunny sky" I used to have sight so I appreciate descriptive alt text on decorative images. - Léonie Watson
  32. 32. Thank you @iheni Inclusivedesignprinciples.org
  33. 33. Thank you @iheni  Inclusivedesignprinciples.org  simpleprimate.com/blog/motor  TPG blog – Challenges, opportunities and the potential for low vision access
  34. 34. • Web accessibility Guidelines focus on: • code over design • technology over people • compliance over experience
  35. 35. Designing for motor impairments doesn’t really have a single approach that guarantees accessibility. You need to consider how your interactions might limit those with motor function disabilities and provide an alternative means of addressing them.
  36. 36. Although I've championed accessibility for most of my career I had no idea I would be impacted by it as much as I have

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