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The European Commission’s
science and knowledge service
Joint Research Centre
Going Open in Europe:
Leveraging open educat...
Openness: modernisation of
teaching and learning practices
• More access routes, content, pathways, etc
• Diverse pedagogi...
The European Commission and the
Open Education movement
 - Advisory role
 - No binding instruments: Member States are
au...
Agenda setting instrument:
Communications
A Communication sets out an Action Plan for the EC
Three EC Communications point...
HE COMM; Pg. 6
Staff working document
DigComp
(DG EMPL)
EntreComp
(DG EMPL)
DigCompConsumers
(DG JUST)
OpenEdu Policies (DG EAC)
MOOCKnowledge
(DG EAC)
Blockcha...
Challenge #1
Promote a commom understanding for
contemporary open education
Openness as a core value
• Open education approaches education practices
through a set of core values, based on
transparen...
OpenEdu Framework workshop, JRC Seville 2016
The OpenEdu
Project
2013-2016
OpenCases OpenCred MoocknowledgeOpenSurvey
OpenEdu Project
OpenEdu Framework
90+ stakeholders consulted
9 case studies 4 c...
OpenEdu Framework workshop, JRC Seville 2016
Opening up Education report, JRC 2016
It can be downloaded from:
http://bit.ly/openeduframework
Challenge # 2
• Focus on key areas in which little research
had been carried out
Report content overview
 Identification and engaging with the key issues which are
influencing policy-makers and other ke...
Challenge # 3
• Make EU-based research evidence on open
education policies available for everyone
OpenEdu Policies
2016-2017
OpenEdu Policies
OpenEdu Policies
OpenEdu
Framework for HE
institutions
Research on
Member States'
OE policies
Workshop wi...
Challenge # 4
• Make sense of those policies within the broad and
diverse educational landscape that we have in
Europe
Levels of policies
Correspondence of policy
with the OpenEdu
Framework
• Four types
of policies
on Open
Education
Q2 Focusing on
ICT for learning
with some
components of
open education
Q4 Polic...
• Four types
of policies
on Open
Education
Q2 Focusing on
ICT for learning
with some
components of
open education
Q4 Polic...
Policy examples
• France’s Fun MOOC (National, Quadrant 1:
OE; OER and OEP)
• “In FUN MOOC universities benefit from traff...
• Four types
of policies
on Open
Education
Q2 Focusing on
ICT for learning
with some
components of
open education
Q4 Polic...
Policy examples
• Portugal’s Conta-nos uma história (National, Quadrant 2: ICT)
• Conta-nos uma história is a national ini...
• Four types
of policies
on Open
Education
Q2 Focusing on
ICT for learning
with some
components of
open education
Q4 Polic...
Policy Examples
• Flanders’ RPL Policy ( National, Q3)
• In the Flanders region in Belgium, open and online education is n...
• Four types
of policies
on Open
Education
Q2 Focusing on
ICT for learning
with some
components of
open education
Q4 Polic...
Policy examples
• Greece’s Action Plan on Open Government
(National, Q4)
• In Greece, the 3rd National Action Plan on Open...
Challenge # 5
• How to create an ecosystem to foster
open education?
“Policies are important
because they are
catalysts for action”
Open Education Ecosystem
 1. awareness raising
 2. regulation, legislation and funding
 3. partnerships
 4. teachers' ...
Important finding from OpenEdu
Policies study:
• “Most MS have implemented some type of
initiative on open education, but ...
What’s next?
• …
• Challenge #6
• Strengthening institutional and national-level
leadership on open education
Current opportunities – policy
agenda:
 Creating the European Education Area by 2025
(Council REC, 2018)
 European Netwo...
The most important shared understanding in
relation to open education is that it is not a case of
one size fits all. Flexi...
Bernard Shaw:
• “The reasonable man adapts himself to
the world; the unreasonable man persists
in trying to adapt the worl...
Thank you
andreia-inamorato-dos.santos@ec.europa.eu
yves.punie@ec.europa.eu
https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/open-education
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age
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Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

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Featured presentation at the OE Global conference of the Open Education Consortium, TU Delft, Netherlands, 25th April 2018. Focus on open education policies

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Going Open: Leveraging Open Education to Enhance Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

  1. 1. The European Commission’s science and knowledge service Joint Research Centre Going Open in Europe: Leveraging open education to enhance teaching and learning in the digital age Dr Andreia Inamorato OE Global, 2018 Delft, Netherlands 24-26th April 2018 @aisantos andreia-inamorato-dos.santos@ec.europa.eu
  2. 2. Openness: modernisation of teaching and learning practices • More access routes, content, pathways, etc • Diverse pedagogical models • Use of digital technologies • Opportunities for innovation • + challenges! •
  3. 3. The European Commission and the Open Education movement  - Advisory role  - No binding instruments: Member States are autonomous regarding decisions about their educational systems  - Different directorates perform different roles: EAC (DG EDUCATION AND CULTURE) JRC ( DG JOINT RESEARCH CENTRE)
  4. 4. Agenda setting instrument: Communications A Communication sets out an Action Plan for the EC Three EC Communications point to open education: 2013: Opening up Education 2017: A Renewed Agenda for HE 2017: School Development and Excellent Teaching for a Great Start in Life
  5. 5. HE COMM; Pg. 6
  6. 6. Staff working document
  7. 7. DigComp (DG EMPL) EntreComp (DG EMPL) DigCompConsumers (DG JUST) OpenEdu Policies (DG EAC) MOOCKnowledge (DG EAC) Blockchain in Education (DG JRC) OPTEV (DG JRC) MOOCs4 inclusion (DG EAC) Learning Analytics (DG JRC) Anticipatory studies Policy & society OrganisationsIndividuals DigCompEdu (DG EAC) DigPolEdu (DG EAC) CPDmodels (DG EAC) ICTinPISA (DG EAC) CompuThink (DG JRC) DigCompOrg4Schools (DG EAC) OpenEdu (HE) (DG EAC) DigCompOrg (DG EAC) Current JRC research on Digital Age Learning and 21st Century Skills
  8. 8. Challenge #1 Promote a commom understanding for contemporary open education
  9. 9. Openness as a core value • Open education approaches education practices through a set of core values, based on transparency, sharing and collaboration. It proposes a shift in mindset in order to allow the implementation of a number of practices focused on openness. • Going Open Report, JRC 2017
  10. 10. OpenEdu Framework workshop, JRC Seville 2016
  11. 11. The OpenEdu Project 2013-2016
  12. 12. OpenCases OpenCred MoocknowledgeOpenSurvey OpenEdu Project OpenEdu Framework 90+ stakeholders consulted 9 case studies 4 case studies 5 countries survey of learners OpenEdu supports the 2013 Communication ' Opening up Education: Innovative Teaching and Learning for all through New Technologies and Open Educational Resources in-house research Final Report
  13. 13. OpenEdu Framework workshop, JRC Seville 2016
  14. 14. Opening up Education report, JRC 2016 It can be downloaded from: http://bit.ly/openeduframework
  15. 15. Challenge # 2 • Focus on key areas in which little research had been carried out
  16. 16. Report content overview  Identification and engaging with the key issues which are influencing policy-makers and other key stakeholders in considering the use of the Blockchain as a value-added proposition within an education landscape (social value proposition: 1. self-sovereignty and identity; 2: trust; 3. transparency and provenance; 4. immutability; 5. disintermediation and 6. collaboration)  Exploration of how education institutions and learners can use the technology as a transparent, trusted system for securing, sharing and verifying academic achievements in Europe ( e.g. ontology of certifications, smart contracts, digital signatures, grants issuing, etc)
  17. 17. Challenge # 3 • Make EU-based research evidence on open education policies available for everyone
  18. 18. OpenEdu Policies 2016-2017
  19. 19. OpenEdu Policies OpenEdu Policies OpenEdu Framework for HE institutions Research on Member States' OE policies Workshop with policy makers on OE policies Policy Recommendations Case studies on 28 Member States
  20. 20. Challenge # 4 • Make sense of those policies within the broad and diverse educational landscape that we have in Europe
  21. 21. Levels of policies
  22. 22. Correspondence of policy with the OpenEdu Framework
  23. 23. • Four types of policies on Open Education Q2 Focusing on ICT for learning with some components of open education Q4 Policies from national open government plans with some components of open education Q 3 Educational strategy policies with some components of open education Q1 Focusing on open education, promoting OER and open educational practices Source: Case studies on policy approaches to OE, JRC 2017 in collaboration with UNIR
  24. 24. • Four types of policies on Open Education Q2 Focusing on ICT for learning with some components of open education Q4 Policies from national open government plans with some components of open education Q 3 Educational strategy policies with some components of open education Q1 Focusing on open education, promoting OER and open educational practices
  25. 25. Policy examples • France’s Fun MOOC (National, Quadrant 1: OE; OER and OEP) • “In FUN MOOC universities benefit from traffic, learners and visibility. It is known that these three aspects are very important for a successful MOOC strategy. University membership in FUN MOOC is optional, but it is beneficial to universities to become members because apart from these three aspects previously mentioned, there is no cost related to infrastructure building. All is ready and available for universities to use as they wish when they become members. They also benefit from the platform's marketing and communication strategies. Fun MOOCs has 29 members, but under the umbrella of a 'member' there can be a network of universities. In total, FUN MOOC has over 200 institutions using the platform, plus external partners, which are in the range of 40 to date. ” • ( Extract from ‘Policy Approaches to Open Education – EU Member States’, JRC 2017)
  26. 26. • Four types of policies on Open Education Q2 Focusing on ICT for learning with some components of open education Q4 Policies from national open government plans with some components of open education Q 3 Educational strategy policies with some components of open education Q1 Focusing on open education, promoting OER and open educational practices
  27. 27. Policy examples • Portugal’s Conta-nos uma história (National, Quadrant 2: ICT) • Conta-nos uma história is a national initiative for schools with State government support, which focuses on ICTs. It is a competition, in which stories are submitted to the initiative's website by the schools. This initiative fosters the use of media. As producers of content, students learn to be responsible and critical consumers of media content. All the content available on Conta-nos uma história is CC licensed. The initiative cross- references with the following the access, content, pedagogy, leadership and collaboration dimensions of the OpenEdu Framework. • ( Extract from ‘Policy Approaches to Open Education – EU Member States’, JRC 2017)
  28. 28. • Four types of policies on Open Education Q2 Focusing on ICT for learning with some components of open education Q4 Policies from national open government plans with some components of open education Q 3 Educational strategy policies with some components of open education Q1 Focusing on open education, promoting OER and open educational practices
  29. 29. Policy Examples • Flanders’ RPL Policy ( National, Q3) • In the Flanders region in Belgium, open and online education is not itself a policy objective; it is related to other HE policy objectives, with regards to accessibility and flexibility, lifelong learning and innovation in HE. It is seen as a tool that contributes to improving flexibility and innovation in HE. The legislation in HE covers many different areas, including some aspects of open (and online) education, such as recognition of prior learning – RPL (formal, non-formal and informal learning). Thus, in Flanders, policies on open education (RPL specifically) are embedded into higher-level policies. • ( Extract from ‘Policy Approaches to Open Education – EU Member States’, JRC 2017)
  30. 30. • Four types of policies on Open Education Q2 Focusing on ICT for learning with some components of open education Q4 Policies from national open government plans with some components of open education Q 3 Educational strategy policies with some components of open education Q1 Focusing on open education, promoting OER and open educational practices
  31. 31. Policy examples • Greece’s Action Plan on Open Government (National, Q4) • In Greece, the 3rd National Action Plan on Open Government 2016-2018 has a clear commitment to open education. • The two main projects (initiatives) of open education that were launched by the Ministry as part of the Action Plan were Open Academic Lessons and the repository Photodentro. These projects aimed to create open lessons on all academic levels for everyone. Some of the policy dimensions of the 3rd National Action Plan on Open Government 2016-2018 are: open data (access), open materials (OER), open lessons (pedagogy), open collaboration, open research, and open source (technology). • ( Extract from ‘Policy Approaches to Open Education – EU Member States’, JRC 2017)
  32. 32. Challenge # 5 • How to create an ecosystem to foster open education?
  33. 33. “Policies are important because they are catalysts for action”
  34. 34. Open Education Ecosystem  1. awareness raising  2. regulation, legislation and funding  3. partnerships  4. teachers' professional development  5. accreditation and recognition of learning  6. open educational resources  7. support and infrastructure  8. research and evaluation
  35. 35. Important finding from OpenEdu Policies study: • “Most MS have implemented some type of initiative on open education, but there’s still a long way to go. In most MS the vision of open education is rather broad, going beyond OER and open content – even if in a number of MS, when this vision is applied to actual policy, the approach is still limited to OER”. • Policy Approaches to Open Education report, JRC 2017
  36. 36. What’s next? • … • Challenge #6 • Strengthening institutional and national-level leadership on open education
  37. 37. Current opportunities – policy agenda:  Creating the European Education Area by 2025 (Council REC, 2018)  European Network of Universities (HE COMM, 2017)  (Could we have OE contemplated in each network sub-set?)  New HE Plataform- one stop shop for HE  New Europass Decision (accepted this month)  How best integrate non-formal learning? Communication on Mutual Recognition of Diplomas (COMM,UPCOMING)
  38. 38. The most important shared understanding in relation to open education is that it is not a case of one size fits all. Flexibility is the key to operating within this complex scenario, and it is also vital to have a strategy in place. Going Open report, JRC 2017
  39. 39. Bernard Shaw: • “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”
  40. 40. Thank you andreia-inamorato-dos.santos@ec.europa.eu yves.punie@ec.europa.eu https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/open-education

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