Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

Enabling and empowering remote employees #HOU365

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 51 Publicité

Enabling and empowering remote employees #HOU365

Télécharger pour lire hors ligne

From the beginning, we have always been a remote first company. Consulting with customers remotely can be a challenge and was an important skill that we have been teaching to our teams. Though building trust with your team was harder than originally thought. We experimented and tried out a number of ways to be inclusive for our diverse team.
Attend this session to learn about
Enabling every employee to have an impact
Supporting and encouraging work/life balance
Encouraging innovation through experimentation

From the beginning, we have always been a remote first company. Consulting with customers remotely can be a challenge and was an important skill that we have been teaching to our teams. Though building trust with your team was harder than originally thought. We experimented and tried out a number of ways to be inclusive for our diverse team.
Attend this session to learn about
Enabling every employee to have an impact
Supporting and encouraging work/life balance
Encouraging innovation through experimentation

Publicité
Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (20)

Similaire à Enabling and empowering remote employees #HOU365 (20)

Publicité

Plus par Kanwal Khipple (20)

Plus récents (20)

Publicité

Enabling and empowering remote employees #HOU365

  1. 1. Led by: From the beginning, we have always been a remote first company. Consulting with customers remotely can be a challenge and was an important skill that we have been teaching to our teams. Though building trust with your team was harder than originally thought. We experimented and tried out several ways to be inclusive for our diverse team. Kanwal Khipple Enabling and Empowering Remote Employees
  2. 2. HOU365 Virtual Friday October 30th, 2020 The schedule is located at: https://www.spsevents.org/event/houston2020/schedule/ Teams meeting link will be in the Teams Meeting Link column for each session. http://bit.ly/HOU365sessions
  3. 3. Thank you to our Diamond Sponsor Sponsor Room http://bit.ly/HOU365invoke
  4. 4. Thank you to Platinum Sponsors Sponsor Room http://bit.ly/HOU365SkySync Sponsor Room http://bit.ly/HOU365KnowledgeLake
  5. 5. Moderators • Track 1 - Space X (Rick) • Track 2 - Discovery (Krishna) • Track 3 - Apollo (Brian) • Track 4 - Falcon 9 (Thor) • Track 5 - Challenger (Mitch)
  6. 6. Online meeting etiquette Mute your microphone when you’re not talking Be Kind to everyone Please ask questions by: Raising your hand in Teams Posting in the Chat If you unmute yourself, please state your name and speak clearly.
  7. 7. Feedback is always welcome HOU365 Virtual Friday 2020 Attendee Survey http://bit.ly/HOU365attendee
  8. 8. SPEAKER | AUTHOR | SUPER GOOD LOOKING KANWAL KHIPPLE, CEO @kkhipple bit.ly/linkedinkk 2014 2015
  9. 9. THOUGHT LEADERSHIP We are internationally recognized award winners, speakers, authors, and more. Our staff has delivered over 500 keynotes, workshops, & sessions around the world.
  10. 10. THOUGHT LEADERSHIP Our customers look to us to provide direction, strategy, guidance and advisory services in addition to our technical consulting services. Here are where a few are headquarters.
  11. 11. WORK FROM HOME
  12. 12. OFFICE IS DEAD
  13. 13. ORGANIC DISCUSSIONS
  14. 14. NETFLIX
  15. 15. ALWAYS ON
  16. 16. LESS TIME FOR FRIENDS AND FAMILY
  17. 17. Employee moral is hard to quantify
  18. 18. WORK LIFE INTEGRATION
  19. 19. WORK FROM HOME • Configure your workspace • Validate connectivity • Continue normal routine Tips on how to maintain and have a great work from home space
  20. 20. IF YOU AREN’T TALKING USE MUTE… While it can be painful learning to remember to unmute yourself it is a lot better than distracting others with breathing, typing, movement or background noise. It’s okay to mute someone! Just @mention them and let them know.
  21. 21. SUPPORTING YOUR REMOTE WORKFORCE Build a network within your team Create structure for your meetings Learn together
  22. 22. HOW WILL YOU BE PRESENT TODAY? Let’s start with the core of a meeting experience. You attend a meeting. When you join you need to decide whether this will be a video supported call or not.
  23. 23. BUILDING WILLPOWER • Create a routine and maintain it Share progress on personal goals Inspire others with your home office setup Share healthy eating recipes
  24. 24. USE THAT MESSAGING SPACE… Anytime someone mentions a resource or something try and create a quick link for everyone on the call. These really help others find things that are being discussed and encourages Q&A. Don’t underestimate the value of simple reactions. They can acknowledge and communicate a lot with very little effort. As an example Miguel during a discussion asked to be a search curator for our Microsoft 365 tenant. By thumbing this up he saw a notification which acted as a marked as read/agreed acknowledgement from me at the time.
  25. 25. MAINTAIN CONNECTION WITH PEERS • Send a ‘good morning’ chat • Catch up over virtual coffee • Have a ‘hallway conversation’ • Add memes and giphys to chats to keep communication fun
  26. 26. ANYTHING BUT WORK Create a ‘watercoller’ channel in your team Share insights on remote working Be the Champion for your workgroup Have frequent team connects • Talk about activities outside of work
  27. 27. START ON TIME OR SOCIALIZE… Is it a formal meeting? Is there an agenda? Is there productive discussion that can be had while we wait for a stakeholder? Is it better to socialize if you join earlier? Can you pause and check in?
  28. 28. BEING INCLUSIVE Facilitate productivity in Teams Establish communication norms Build an inclusive environment
  29. 29. RECOGNIZE & USE RAISED HANDS… One of the most challenging things in virtual meetings is interrupting or acknowledging you have something to say. Even if you write it in the side discussion it can be useful to action it. Especially Useful In Larger Meetings
  30. 30. GETTING WORK DONE Configure personal settings in Teams Allow colleagues to “see” you Be active in meetings • Ensuring you can focus to get your work completed
  31. 31. VISUAL NOTE TAKING IS IMPORTANT… When conducting any meeting there should never be a blank screen (if it’s not about eye contact). Use PowerPoint, OneNote, Word, or an open Email. Take notes as people talk and facilitate. When running meetings - Share notes - Take notes interactively
  32. 32. VISUAL NOTE TAKING IS IMPORTANT… Shared notes are even better so everyone can add to them interactively as the meeting proceeds instead of just a facilitator.
  33. 33. VISUAL NOTE TAKING IS IMPORTANT… Advanced concepts like mind mapping can take this even further and may be an even better visual tool to create shared understanding.
  34. 34. WHERE DO MEETING NOTES GO? You have two approaches for taking and managing meeting notes OneNote or Notes/Wiki (beyond email or structured word docs and other more formal/informal methods).
  35. 35. EMPOWERING EMPLOYEES
  36. 36. SUCCESSFUL EMPLOYEES • Self-motivated • Initiative • Purposefulness • Self-awareness • Independent decision making • Leadership Skills Skills that are markers of successful employees
  37. 37. COMMUNICATE GOALS • Ask employees when they can accomplish activities
  38. 38. PEER FEEDBACK • Ask team members to provide feedback during connects • Frequent (quarter) Anonymous feedback
  39. 39. REVERSE MENTORING • Getting feedback on how you can do better
  40. 40. ASK & RECORD AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE… There is no risk if you agreed to record it since most teams are private and even 1:1 calls when recorded are only for the individuals who took part. This can be extremely useful in the future.
  41. 41. SHARING RECORDINGS EXTERNALLY… When you record a meeting it’s easy to find and it shows in the team discussion or in your inbox, but to share it externally you have to download it and share it in SP or OneDrive.
  42. 42. INNOVATIVELY ITERATIVELY
  43. 43. Shorter deliberate meetings Increase in planned ‘informal meetups’
  44. 44. VISUAL NOTE TAKING IS IMPORTANT… When conducting any meeting there should never be a blank screen (if it’s not about eye contact). Use PowerPoint, OneNote, Word, or an open Email. Take notes as people talk and facilitate. When running meetings - Share notes - Take notes interactively
  45. 45. VISUAL NOTE TAKING IS IMPORTANT… Shared notes are even better so everyone can add to them interactively as the meeting proceeds instead of just a facilitator.
  46. 46. VISUAL NOTE TAKING IS IMPORTANT… Advanced concepts like mind mapping can take this even further and may be an even better visual tool to create shared understanding.
  47. 47. WHERE DO MEETING NOTES GO? You have two approaches for taking and managing meeting notes OneNote or Notes/Wiki (beyond email or structured word docs and other more formal/informal methods).
  48. 48. MAKING MISTAKES Lessons learned Lunch and learns Showcase Sprint retro Project steering meetings • Having a growth mindset promotes mistakes
  49. 49. CELEBRATE GROWTH • Take every opportunity to celebrate and share lessons learned Project completion Showcase to peers Share customer feedback During performance reviews
  50. 50. SPEAKER | AUTHOR | SUPER GOOD LOOKING KANWAL KHIPPLE, CEO @kkhipple bit.ly/linkedinkk 2014 2015

Notes de l'éditeur

  • From the beginning, we have always been a remote first company. Consulting with customers remotely can be a challenge and was an important skill that we have been teaching to our teams. Though building trust with your team was harder than originally thought. We experimented and tried out a number of ways to be inclusive for our diverse team. Attend this session to learn about - Enabling every employee to have an impact - Supporting and encouraging work/life balance - Encouraging innovation through experimentation


  • Employees needed support.
    people were working too many hours
    People were on too many projects
    Research was not reflected
  • Tips on working from home
    Tips on improving employee connections
    Tips on improving employee happiness
  • Designate a location
    Separate from your living space
    Commute to work
    Set ground rules
    Configure your workspace
    Mimic office setup
    Secure devices
    Play music
    Validate internet and network connectivity
    Check your internet provider
    Confirm vpn with your help desk
    Limit non-work internet use
    Continue normal work routine
    Maintain standard working hours
    Dress for the office
    Take breaks
  • Build a network within your team
    Set up a team/channels for your team
    Make 1:1s a priority
    Establish/maintain weekly team meetings
    Encourage video, which includes blur background. Currently my office is an absolute mess - but with blur (In Microsoft Teams) is a great help there. Ensure to respect people that for any reason dont cant/want to go on video, but video should (in my opinion) be an opt-out not opt-in.

    Create structure for your meetings
    Minimize distractions with a formal agenda
    Encourage everyone to speak up
    Schedule breaks for long meetings/planning sessions
    Learn together
    Embrace the distractions (kids, dogs, doorbells, etc)
    Be open to flex time
    Encoruage your team to connect with one another
  • Employees with a strong ability to self-regulate can mitigate the stress of constant connectivity. Also known as “willpower,” self-regulation represents our ability to resist temptation. Anyone who has been expecting an update on Slack while eating dinner with the family knows that the “need” to check for that update is a very real temptation.
    The good news is that self-regulation is a muscle that gets stronger the more you use it. In other words, no one is cursed to live a life without willpower — it can be improved. Even better, self-regulation is universal; the willpower used to resist that second piece of cheesecake is the same willpower that can keep you from checking your phone for the 14th time this hour.
    To improve your willpower, we recommend starting with the basics. With your new work environment being the home, it is easy to grow lax when it comes to daily chores and following basic routines. Not making the bed anymore? Make your bed. Instead of slouching at your desk chair — sit up straight. Diet gone out the window after your third week in quarantine? Get back on the healthy eating wagon. All of these little, minor disciplines are small workouts that strengthen your overall willpower and will ultimately help you in separating your work life from your home life.

    Our recommendations for combatting this lack of willpower are twofold. First, don’t give your willpower a chance to falter. Set a hard cut-off for checking your messages from work and then physically enforce it — close Slack, log out of Teams, turn off your phone. At a minimum, turn off all notifications so that you don’t hear or see the “incoming” message alert. Remember, if you don’t have cheesecake in your refrigerator, you can’t eat it — similarly, if you can’t see the messages, you can’t check them. Note that this may mean you need to “manage your boss” to set realistic expectations as to how quickly you will be able to respond after certain hours.
    Second, as the pandemic continues to wear on, some people may begin to feel like they are struggling with a lack of willpower and an absence of motivation. This is a vicious cycle because willpower requires motivation. This makes intuitive sense; there is no reason to self-regulate your behavior if you have no motivation to do so. Thus, if you are feeling unmotivated right now, it is going to be incredibly difficult to self-regulate. No one is going to fault you for failing to stay motivated during this pandemic, especially when the vast majority of us have been labeled “unessential.” However, this is the time to take a moment and reflect on why your job is “essential” to you, to your clients, and to the greater community. Try not to forget that all of us are contributing to something bigger than ourselves. 


    Share progress on personal goals
    Inspire others with your home office setup
    Share healthy eating recipes

  • Send a ‘good morning’ chat
    Catch up over virtual coffee
    Have a ‘hallway conversation’
    Add memes and giphys to chats to keep communication fun
  • Create a ‘watercoller’ channel in your team
    Share insights on remote working
    Be the Champion for your workgroup
    Have frequent team connects

  • Facilitate productivity in Teams
    Post shared files to your teams channels
    Pin important apps/resources for easy access
    Encourage channel chats to keep everyone aligned
    Establish communication norms
    Limit how much/often you share the same message
    Set expectations for response times
    Allow opportunity to everyone to respond
    Use the general channel for team announcements
    Build an inclusive environment
    Encourage feedback and questions
    Do ‘round-robins’ in team meetings/chats
    Be mindful of schedules and locations
  • Configure personal settings in Teams
    Test your headset/webcam
    Set your status and status message
    Pin active chats and conversations
    Allow colleagues to “see” you
    Embrace “do not disturb” status
    Use @mentions to grab attention
    Enable video with background blur
    Be active in meetings
    Make every meeting a Teams meeting
    Use a headset to alleviate background noise
    Leverage meeting chat to share thoughts/files
    Mute when not talking
  • What are the key indicators of a successful employee
    Encourage feedback and support
    Celebrate success
  • self-motivated People who are self-motivated will have a solid answer to this question. They love a good challenge and stay focused on it, even when they face a setback, or a shiny new object enters their field of vision



    INITIATIVE
    This question varies based on what type of role you’re interviewing for. If it’s a design or marketing role, ask what struck them about the company’s website. If it’s a finance role, ask what struck them about the numbers you released last quarter. And so on. “What struck you about our company values?” is a good all-purpose variant.
    What you’re sniffing out here is how pro-active the candidate is. Did they take the initiative to research the company a bit? As a manager, you have better things to do that prod remote workers into action all the time. So make sure you won’t have to.

    PURPOSEFULNESS
    Effective remote workers are hyper-engaged in their work. They understand why it’s valuable and that shows through. It’s hard to course-correct someone’s sense of purpose if they’re remote, so make sure your candidate nails this one.

    Ideally, they’ll say that their passionate about the company’s mission. Or they might be excited to hone a new skill. Or work at a different type of company. However they answer, make sure their sense of purpose and yours are in alignment.


    SELF-AWARENESS
    Even the most introverted remote workers need a little social nourishment. How does your candidate plan to get it? It’s less important what exactly their answer is. Really, you want to see that they’ve considered how being remote will affect them and have some idea what they’ll do to adapt.

    In an office setting, people tacitly look out for each other (“Hey, you look really tired today – everything ok?”). Remote workers, on the other hand, have to be keenly self-aware and good at self-care or they risk burning out.



    INDEPENDENT DECISION MAKING
    You’ll have an easier time managing remote team members who you can trust to make the right call on small and medium-sized decisions autonomously. The best remote workers take time to understand the bigger picture, as well as what they need to optimize for at all costs vs. where they can be flexible so they can evaluate trade-offs effectively.

    Hearing how they’ve handled decisions where they were flying blind to some extent gives you an especially good window into their decision-making process. It reveals what information they sought out and what information they felt they could do without. Keep an eye ear out for how they thought about their decision’s impact on customers and stakeholders – not just themselves or their immediate team.

    LEADERSHIP
    Even if the job isn’t managerial, leadership skills are still important – especially if your company is one where individual contributors frequently play the role of project lead.

    Leading from afar means being extra-intentional about coordinating and communicating. So listen carefully to how they’d build the business case for the project and convince the leadership team to give it the green light. Then, how would they pull a project team together? A good remote worker will instinctively think about all the different job functions or skills needed for the project and won’t hesitate to get other teams involved if need be.


    COMMUNICATION SKILLS
    Ok, this is sort of a trick question. It’s unlikely anyone you’re interviewing would walk in with enough information to answer it authoritatively. And that’s the point. A good remote worker will ask clarifying questions right away. What are the team’s priorities right now? What projects are already in flight? What have we already tried that didn’t work?
    Once they’ve got enough context to formulate an answer, look for candidates who get right to the point. A low signal-to-noise ratio is key for effective, efficient remote work. 

  • When all your interactions with colleagues are virtual – either voice, video, or text – it’s easy to miss out on social cues like body language or tone of voice. That’s why remote workers with a high level of emotional intelligence are more successful. They’re able to empathize and anticipate that person’s concerns or mood, then let that influence their communications with that person.

    This question will reveal whether the candidate imagined themselves in the other person’s shoes before speaking with them, and how they took that into account. Candidates with an especially high EQ will talk about how they focused the feedback on the other person’s actions and behaviors, rather than their innate characteristics or worth. Also, take note of whether they offered to help the other person work on a solution or make changes – another sign of emotional intelligence.


    A more effective approach is to actively choose what to request of your employees and work with them to determine a realistic timeline for that task’s completion. This aids in establishing standards of “how” work will be done, not just “what” work will be done. Setting such expectations acknowledges the stresses employees are experiencing and likely will result in reduced stress and higher quality job performance.


    Different in Leading meetings in person versus remotely
  • Give feedback
    Ensure you are providing regular feedback

    Walking meetings
    Take the opportunity to both get up and walk during you connect with team members

    Peer Feedback
    Ask team members to provide feedback

    Reverse Mentoring
    Ask for feedback from team members

    Celebrate Growth
    Quarterly connects to learn about what they learned
  • Give feedback
    Ensure you are providing regular feedback

    Walking meetings
    Take the opportunity to both get up and walk during you connect with team members

    Peer Feedback
    Ask team members to provide feedback

    Reverse Mentoring
    Ask for feedback from team members

    Celebrate Growth
    Quarterly connects to learn about what they learned
  • A lot of times what you set out to do, is not always achievable
  • Shorter deliberate meetings
    Reduce longer meetings with shorter meetings (15/30 min)

    Increase in planned ‘informal meetups’
    Informal conversations benefit a lot to remote employees. Bringing structure with predictable-yet optional social activities meetings see an increase-as an alternative to the coffee corner conversations
  • The collaboration practices that worked well in their last job, might not work in this one. Especially if your team isn’t used to having a remote member, or if this would be the candidate’s first remote-based job. You need someone who is flexible, persevering, eager to experiment, and doesn’t assume they already know the best way of doing things. Sound familiar? Those are key components of a growth mindset. 
    A candidate who is all about growth and continuous improvement will have at least one story in this vein. Listen carefully to how they frame the failure, though. Do they take ownership, or shift the blame elsewhere? Unless they openly accept responsibility, they probably didn’t learn anything. Owning the failure also demonstrates a desirable blend of humility, confidence, and integrity.

  • Project completion
    Showcase to peers
    Share customer feedback
    During performance reviews

×