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Basic guide to SPSS

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Basic guide to SPSS

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This is a very basic guide to SPSS. It is aimed at total novices wishing to understand the basic layout of the package and how to generate some simple tables and graphs

This is a very basic guide to SPSS. It is aimed at total novices wishing to understand the basic layout of the package and how to generate some simple tables and graphs

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Basic guide to SPSS

  1. 1. A Basic Guide to SPSS Paul Gorman p.gorman@aston.ac.uk
  2. 2. SPSS has two tabs: Data View and Variable View
  3. 3. ‘Data View’ is where the numbers are inputted e.g. Survey responses
  4. 4. ‘Variable View’ is where you see behind the data i.e. where you tell SPSS what the numbers represent
  5. 5. This is what Data View looks like with some content added
  6. 6. Each row is a respondent’s answers to a survey
  7. 7. Each column contains all the answers to a particular question by all respondents
  8. 8. In ‘Variable View’ this is what the data looks like. Think of this part as putting a key to your graph, a way of telling people what the numbers represent
  9. 9. Each variable can be named. No spaces or special characters are allowed (just keep it to simple one word names)
  10. 10. SPSS can deal with words as well as numbers, but the ‘Type’ of data should mostly be numeric. Data made up of words is called ‘String’ data
  11. 11. This is where you can give your variable a meaningful label. This will be the label that appears in tables and graphs
  12. 12. The ‘value’ tab is where you turn your numbers into meaningful values. E.g. 1 = Female, 2 = Male
  13. 13. Once you have imported your data, or inputted it manually if your questionnaire is on paper, you can start to make sense of the data that you have. It can be time-consuming, but the results are clean, efficient and the data can scrutinized in countless ways Even basic ‘descriptive’ statistics can be revealing, interesting and easy to run in numerous ways
  14. 14. Generating Frequency Tables: These include number of respondents, percentages etc.
  15. 15. Select the appropriate variable/s
  16. 16. A new window opens with your data
  17. 17. If you want to export your data to another format, then run the tables as normal…
  18. 18. … then select the tables you wish to export, right-click and select ‘Export’
  19. 19. Select format you wish to export to and file destination
  20. 20. If you wish to view Graphs or Pie Charts, then select ‘Charts’ when choosing your variables, then select appropriate ‘Chart Type’
  21. 21. SPSS will simultaneously generate frequency tables and any charts you wish in the same output
  22. 22. Same process as above for Bar Charts
  23. 23. To compare different variables, select ‘Crosstabs’
  24. 24. Select the appropriate variables and use the arrows to move them into the ‘rows’ and Note that I have checked the ‘columns’ box to generate Bar Charts so we can see the comparisons in sections a visual format
  25. 25. The default tables only shows the N figure e.g. number of respondents
  26. 26. To add percentages to the tables click the ‘Cell’ button and check the appropriate boxes
  27. 27. If you wish to view specific cases and eliminate any variables from your data, such as ‘Mentors’, then go to ‘Select Cases’
  28. 28. Select ‘If condition is satisfied’ and then click the ‘If’ button
  29. 29. Select your variable and … Then click then use the = and select arrow to the number send it to that the other represents side of the the variables screen… you wish to view
  30. 30. Now you can run all the data as before, but only Mentees are being used

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