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CIO | 3 STEPS to Maximizing ROI for Microsoft Lync Enterprise Voice

ENTERPRISES ARE STANDING AT A CROSSROADS AND COMMUNICATION IS KEY TO SUCCESS.

In today’s highly competitive, global marketplace. Executives need to make decisions quickly, but information and employees are spread out in many different locations. To operate efficiently, businesses need fast, simple ways to exchange data.

As a result, many enterprises stand at an important crossroad. They have invested large sums in legacy Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) network voice infrastructures that do not easily support modern Unified Communications (UC) solutions, such as the increasingly popular Microsoft Lync.

“About 70% of businesses are now using Lync in some fashion,” states Irwin Lazar, Vice President and Service Director for The Nemertes Research Group, Inc. “Most of these companies use it for instant messaging, web conferencing, and voice/video chat. A small but growing percentage are using it to replace or augment their PBXs.”
In addition to delivering new communication options, Unified Commu- nications delivers other benefits. By leaving behind their legacy PBX and moving ahead to a new Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) network infrastructure, businesses reduce their capital expenditure (CapEx) and lower their ongoing maintenance requirements, which can decrease their operating expenditure (OpEx) by as much as 50%.
The transition from the old to the new works with the right network infrastructure. Enterprises need one that is rock solid. “Today, businesses simply cannot tolerate downtime,” says James Rodd, Co-Founder and Managing Director at Modality Systems, Unified Communications specialists. Businesses must also have a way to integrate their traditional systems with new, modern functions. Finally, they need a solution that offers robust security, so corporate data
is protected as it travels from location to location. To deliver such functionality, enterprises need a Session Border Controller (SBC) that works in conjunction with Lync to enable the delivery of sophisticated voice, data, and video services to enterprise users.

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CIO | 3 STEPS to Maximizing ROI for Microsoft Lync Enterprise Voice

  1. 1. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind P L AY B O O K sonus.net to Maximizing ROI for Microsoft Lync Enterprise Voice 3 STEPS The combination of a strong Session Border Controller and Lync enables corporations to reduce CapEx and OpEx, improve network availability, take advantage of modern applications, boost employee productivity, and enhance enterprise security.
  2. 2. COMMUNICATION IS KEY TO SUCCESS in today’s highly competitive, global marketplace. Executives need to make decisions quickly, but information and employees are spread out in many different locations. To operate efficiently, businesses need fast, simple ways to exchange data. As a result, many enterprises stand at an impor- tant crossroad. They have invested large sums in legacy Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) network voice infrastructures that do not easily support modern Unified Communications (UC) solutions, such as the increasingly popular Microsoft Lync. Unified Communications (UC) is the next stage in the evolution of enter- prise communications and collaboration technologies, bringing all varied connections under a single architecture. This process makes communi- cation seamless, no matter where you are or what device you use. These communications can be delivered over an Internet protocol (IP) network through voice, video and data. One of the most compelling benefits of UC is its ability to empower mobility. Unified Communications doesn’t limit enterprises to the desktop; UC platforms can support mobile devices as fully integrated clients. To make this work, enterprises need a working data connection on a mobile device and a UC app installed on the device by the IT department or through an app store. It’s that simple. Microsoft Lync is an enterprise-ready Unified Communications platform. Lync connects people everywhere, on desktop and mobile devices, as part of their everyday productivity experience. “About 70% of businesses are now using Lync in some fashion,” states Irwin Lazar, Vice President and Service Director for The Nemertes Research Group, Inc. “Most of these companies use it for instant messaging, web conferencing, and voice/video chat. A small but growing percentage are using it to replace or augment their PBXs.” In addition to delivering new communication options, Unified Commu- nications delivers other benefits. By leaving behind their legacy PBX and moving ahead to a new Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) network infrastructure, businesses reduce their capital expenditure (CapEx) and lower their ongoing maintenance requirements, which can decrease their operating expenditure (OpEx) by as much as 50%. The transition from the old to the new works with the right network infrastructure. Enterprises need one that is rock solid. “Today, businesses simply cannot tolerate downtime,” says James Rodd, Co-Founder and Managing Director at Modality Systems, Unified Communications specialists. Businesses must also have a way to integrate their traditional systems with new, modern functions. Finally, they need a solution that offers robust security, so corporate data is protected as it travels from location to location. To deliver such functionality, enterprises need a Session Border Controller (SBC) that works in conjunction with Lync to enable the delivery of sophisticated voice, data, and video services to enterprise users. How Lync Enterprise Voice Benefits Corporations In many cases, business communication is being stymied because the design of traditional PBX voice systems has become anti- Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind 2P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® ENTERPRISES ARE STANDING AT A CROSSROADS
  3. 3. 3P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® quated. These solutions were designed with a single purpose: to carry voice communications, and thus they offer limited integration with new communication options. Consequently, they do not work well with multimedia communications or new collaboration tools. Another problem is these systems often tie users to their desks: these solutions were not built for wireless communications and thus do not readily integrate with cellular and Wi-Fi networks or mobile devices. Lync Enterprise Voice delivers businesses a better platform, one that integrates scattered corporate communication pieces together. On the voice side, Lync Enterprise Voice provides numerous enhanced calling features: CALL FLEXIBILITY: Click-to-call a contact, hold, forward, transfer, divert, park, or retrieve SIMPLICITY: Users click on a contact card displayed on their computer screens and calls are placed over Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTNs) or Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) networks DEVICE SELECTION: Employees receive incoming communi- cations simultaneously on all of their communications devices, enabling them to answer with the most convenient one Lync is highly cost-effective. “By moving to Lync, businesses can simplify their UC architecture–eliminating separate PBXs and thus reducing licensing and operational costs associated with running a separate platform for telephony,” notes Nemertes Research’s Lazar. Users enact moves, adds, and changes themselves, so the IT staff spends time on more meaningful, revenue-producing tasks. With a new enterprise voice system, businesses not only reduce CapEx and OpEx expenses but they also improve employee produc- tivity. Information flows more quickly throughout the organization. With UC, communication modality can evolve immediately. Communi- cation is streamlined, data transfers are enhanced, and video confer- encing becomes more common. Instead of listening to an audio call, retrieving a presentation from email, and having to reserve the video conferencing room an employee can use UC to engage in a multiple point video conference from their desk that includes the ability to share content. In fact, many businesses reduce airplane travel by 10% or more, so rather than sitting on a plane and traveling to and from New York and San Jose, employees spend those 10 hours in the office, collaborating with their coworkers. “One of our customers wanted to use the conferencing capa- bilities within Lync to reduce its travel expenses by 10%; but because Lync was so simple to use, they reduced it by nearly 90%,” which amounted to significant cost savings, adds Modality Systems’ Rodd. Yet few companies are fully reaping the potential benefits. Right now, Nemertes estimates that only 11% of businesses are replacing or planning to replace their PBXs with Lync for telephony; most are only using Lync for instant messaging, according to Lazar. To fully take advantage of Lync Enterprise Voice functionality, a corporation needs a robust SBC, which acts like a network “Swiss Army Knife” ensuring that everything works together seamlessly. Key features found in the best SBCs are reliability, integration with old and new networking solutions, integrated dial plan and policy management, and strong security. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind
  4. 4. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind 4P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® In early 2012, Sonus found itself in a predicament faced by many businesses. A series of acquisitions and expansion by various departments had left it with a network hodgepodge. The network equipment supplier had 1,100 employees stationed in nine offices spread out on three continents. The employees used a variety of communication and collaboration systems, but a more cohesive network infrastructure was needed. In the summer of 2012, Sonus CIO Bill Scudder and his team pushed a company- wide migration to Microsoft’s Lync system to the top of the IT priority list. Time was of the essence. The firm decided to move all employees to Lync messaging, video, and voice functions in eight weeks. An upgrade to the Sonus enterprise network took about six more months. As part of that change, Sonus consolidated its network infrastructure: replacing legacy PSTN and VoIP gateways at each office with a single Sonus Session Border Controller branch appliance. Sonus also integrated the Microsoft solution with key business applications, such as Salesforce.com and Microsoft Exchange. The enhanced communication and collabo- ration among colleagues provided employees with several benefits: Click-to-call from their IM or email screen whenever they see a coworker is available Host interactive whiteboarding sessions with cohorts from around the world Set up an audio or video conference for up to 200 people in less than 60 seconds Share their desktops with remote technical support specialists for faster problem resolution In April 2013, the upgrade was completed, and workers became more productive. When impediments like snowstorms prevent employees from reaching the office, more work rather than less is completed because individuals still collaborate with their colleagues. In the first full month after the companywide rollout of Lync, the number of internally hosted video conferences rose by nearly 50%. Perhaps most important, Sonus has already seen a nearly 200% ROI from the following cost reductions: $40,000 savings per office by replacing multiple voice gateways with a single SBC $150,000 per year savings in operational expenses by simplifying/unifying network administration on a single communications platform (Lync) $200,000 per year savings by internally hosting telecom services on the Lync Server and using the SIP-based wide area network to route long-distance calls Many businesses find themselves in similar positions to Sonus: running their busi- ness on a less than optimally designed network. Taking the time to upgrade to a modern UC solution, SIP, and SBC based network offers them the potential to dramatically reduce their operating costs as well as significantly boost employee productivity. Sonus Dramatically Cuts Cost with New Lync Enterprise Voice Solution VIDEO: Learn how Lync Voice delivered improved productivity and a 200% ROI }
  5. 5. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind 5P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® DEPLOY A RELIABLE NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE TO PERFORM WELL AND ENABLE their businesses to succeed, employees need to exchange information quickly and easily. As a result, business performance has become closely tied to network availability: indeed, wide area network (WAN) outages can cost busi- nesses hundreds of thousands of dollars per incident. Businesses cannot afford any network interruptions; they are simply too disruptive and expensive. In the airline industry for instance, carriers rely on their networks to book flights and convey information to passengers. In late September 2010, the check-in and online booking systems of Australian airline Virgin Blue (now Virgin Australia) began suffering intermittent downtime. Then a hardware failure on September 26 brought down the airline’s Internet booking, reservations, check-in and boarding systems. The outage severely disrupted Virgin Blue’s busi- ness, affecting around 50,000 passengers and 400 flights, before order was restored in early October. Virgin Blue had outsourced maintenance of its reservation system to Navitaire, an airline reservation specialist; Virgin Blue estimated the cost of the outage at $20 million. However, there are limitations with existing enterprise voice system designs. The most obvious is vulnerability: they feature two critical points of failure. With TDM trunking, companies operate a single, physical connection between themselves and their service providers. If something happens to that connection, the service goes down, and all users are left without network access. Even with an IP-PBX and SIP trunking, a company still has a central point of failure. All of the system intelligence is confined to the data center. If a problem arises there or on a link from it to a remote branch, then all of the employees are knocked offline and there is no way for anyone to communicate. In markets like financial services, healthcare, and oil and gas, such outages are catastrophic. To date, adding needed redundancy has left companies with three mainly untenable options: 1. First, companies could duplicate the systems configurations: This approach is often impractical because of very high CapEx. 2.Companies could put fully redundant lines in place. With SIP, calls are routed over any portion of a firm’s IP bandwidth. If a link goes down in one location, data is sent via other IP connec- tions. But this approach is OpEx intensive. Technicians need to manually enter data and track network changes. 3.Put network appliances in each location: This melding of the first two options is not a panacea because it can still be costly and difficult to maintain if the correct appliance is not chosen. The best option is Lync, SIP and the right SBC. With this design, companies reduce network device complexity because minimal hardware elements (true appliances rather than servers) are stationed at remote locations. This approach offers flexibility: it supports 3G or 4G wireless connections as well as local switching. This alternative is reliable: the system automatically routes calls if hardware or WAN problems arise. Lync, SIP and the right SBC add the resiliency needed with today’s enterprise networks.
  6. 6. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind P L AY B O O K 6sonus.net ® Microsoft Lync is clearly outperforming the competition, according to market research firm Synergy Group. The company found that in 2012 worldwide revenues for enterprise IP telephony fell by more than 6%, but Microsoft’s revenue in the segment grew by more than 40%. So what is behind the seemingly antithetical numbers? First, the design of the Microsoft solution fits well with emerging commu- nication system design. These functions are shifting from a voice only design to support for multimedia communications. Because it supports a variety of communication options (voice, video, email, instant messaging) Lync meshes well with the growing business need to run sophisticated voice applications, such as contact centers and unified communications. “With Lync, businesses are able to dramati- cally change the corporate culture and how employees collaborate,” MICROSOFT LYNC GAINS SUPPORTERS says James Rodd, Co-Founder and Managing Director at Modality Systems, a Unified Communications specialist. Second, Microsoft offers robust integration with existing enter- prise business systems. Many companies run their business on products like Windows, Exchange, SharePoint, and Microsoft Office. “Lync offers strong connectivity to Microsoft business solutions,” states Irwin Lazar, Vice President and Service Director for Nemertes Research Group, Inc. Microsoft has also done well extending its communications options. Lync includes robust voice functions, but it also stacks up well against leading instant message and presence solutions. The Microsoft Lync voice system works well with social networking products. For Microsoft, the best is yet to come. “Microsoft is poised to gain more momentum in enterprise voice communications market,” concludes Nemertes’ Lazar. “Microsoft is poised to gain more momentum in enterprise voice communications market.” — Irwin Lazar, Vice President and Service Director, Nemertes Research
  7. 7. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind P L AY B O O K 7sonus.net ® SOOTHE MIGRATION PAIN POINTS ENTERPRISES TODAY ARE RESPONDING to new competitive challenges and starting to deploy modern applications; however, many can be hampered by outdated network infrastructures. They need a networking solution that will enable them to migrate from an out-of-date network to a modern SIP infrastructure. Implement Enterprise Voice while retaining some or all of the IP-PBX infrastructure. In some cases, this will be to leverage the TDM telephony interfaces offered by the IP-PBX, while in other cases, the IP-PBX will stay in service to provide specific services or to serve some segments of the network while others are transitioned to Enter- prise Voice. The SBC plays a vital intermediation role and can provide SIP normal- ization, transcoding, and transrating to allow a smooth integration between Enterprise Voice and the IP-PBX. Most larger enterprises have a disparate IP-PBX base—more than one vendor serving the company with different IP-PBXs in different locations. In these cases, an SBC is even more vital to a smooth integration because it’s likely that each of these different IP-PBXs will have its own SIP variations and transcoding requirements. However, communications system upgrades must be carried out without risking downtime. Rip and replace is out of the question. What’s more, employees resist change. They prefer to continue working with an old system rather than learn how to use a new one. Consequently, businesses need to invest time, effort, and money into educating employees about the benefits of a new system. Also, voice systems are large and complex, so moving to a new one takes time. As a result, enterprises need a new voice infrastructure that: Works with existing as well as new handsets Is compatible with legacy equipment: Fax numbers, call center ACDs, and paging systems Supports enhanced services, like E911 Works with Microsoft’s Active Directory for a smooth migration In addition to the SIP normalization and transcoding/rating functions, SBCs also serve to provide a centralized call routing intelligence — located logically “above” both the IP-PBXs and the Lync Enterprise Voice servers. So the SBC can be the brains of the deployment, helping to ensure that calls are routed correctly, with the most effi- cient use of network resources and the lowest costs. In sum, movement to a new network infrastructure is a complex process. In many enterprises, migrating to a new system takes two to three years. Because of this, businesses demand enterprise voice solutions that coexist with the old system as employees begin to take advantage of the new one.
  8. 8. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind 8P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® CLOSE NEW SECURITY HOLES HISTORICALLY, IT MANAGERS have not lost sleep worrying about TDM security: these lines were not open to intrusion. Instead, the migration from legacy TDM to VoIP networks makes their nights much more restless. With IP-based voice communications, they open them- selves up to malware, worms, and man-in-the-middle attacks. In fact, SIP-sniffing software is readily available to criminals on the Internet. For enterprises, the security stakes are quite high. Lync Enterprise Voice network operators—both enterprises and service providers— face threats to the security of their network and business in addition to the everyday issues such as how to make VoIP work seamlessly and efficiently while also realizing the cost and bandwidth savings that VoIP promises. Some of the common attacks enterprise and service providers face are: DENIAL OF SERVICE (DOS) ATTACKS: Outside attempts to over- whelm the network with fake connections SPOOFING ATTACKS: Nefarious users attempt to gain access to the network deceptively TOLL FRAUD: Hackers attempt to access the network in order to route calls over it at the network owner’s expense To address the problem, companies should no longer link IP trunks directly to a PBX. Instead, they should terminate trunks at a SIP- capable SBC, which acts as a firewall. Unlike a TDM line, a SIP system prohibits persons from simply plugging in and making calls. Trunks are provisioned only after users are authenticated. During a recent webinar, Nemertes revealed the top three productivity trends in UC and cited increased security as the number one reason why enter- prises are deploying an SBC. The SBC controls the admission of calls in and out of the enterprise and protects the network against denial of service (DoS) attacks, toll fraud, and other attacks against the Lync Enterprise Voice network. Additionally, the SBC can “hide” the topology of the Lync network within the enterprise, so external parties aren’t able to detect the devices within. The Path Forward The use of Lync Enterprise Voice is becoming more common in busi- nesses because the technology offers firms a way to cut costs and improve produc- tivity. However, enterprises need to deploy this system in a way that offers them reliability, a sound migration path, and security. To do this, they should combine the Lync system with a state-of-the-art SBC.
  9. 9. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind 9P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® SESSION BORDER CONTROLLERS play a critical role in acceler- ating Microsoft Lync deployments. Too often, enterprises get delayed because of unforeseen or unplanned challenges. So, how do enter- prises ensure a quick and successful Lync deployment? A few simple steps–and considerations–can help move your Lync deployment forward, easily and reliably. #1 Plan Ahead Most Lync deployments begin with instant messaging (IM) and pres- ence, which is the logical first step. Once the infrastructure necessary for IM and presence is deployed, enterprises also have the ability to do peer-to-peer voice and video. However, existing voice communication infrastructure (consisting of IP and legacy PBXs as well as PSTN trunks) is often a separate “voice island” that doesn’t interoperate well with Lync. Unified Communications is about having single identity reach, regard- less of the device or user application, whether a desk phone, a mobile phone or even a smartphone application. Disparate “voice islands” create just the opposite–separation, not unification. Most enterprises also won’t retire existing infrastructure immediately at the onset of 3 TIPS FOR MOVING YOUR LYNC DEPLOYMENT FORWARD Lync deployment, which means a mix of old and new in the network. Many enterprises will move from PSTN trunks to SIP trunking (if not doing so already) to take advantage of new features like high-definition (HD) voice and video and enable Cloud communications, but the move will be at their own pace. Without planning ahead, enterprises that start a Lync pilot with IM and presence may get stuck in the pilot phase indefinitely when they come
  10. 10. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind 1 0P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® across these “new requirements” for voice deployment. They need a way to migrate to Lync seamlessly with ease. #2 Remember: It is always an interworking and survivability story Enterprises need to consider how to bridge voice islands because more often than not, it will be a migration story from existing to new technologies. Interworking is the key to make it work together. And interworking is an even bigger requirement when enterprises are planning to deploy (or will deploy) SIP trunks in an environment with both Lync and legacy equipment. Many enterprises underestimate the amount of analog devices in their network that need to interoperate with the new technology. Fax machines, common area phones, paging systems, etc., all need to be planned into an enterprise’s Lync migration to ensure a seamless, successful deployment. Enterprises also need a business continuity plan in the event of a network outage. This is especially critical for enterprises with branch offices. If the wide area network (WAN) goes down, enterprises need to ensure communication and connectivity between the corporate head- quarters and remote locations. They also need to ensure that enterprise branches are able to make calls out to 911 during emergencies even during WAN outage. #3 Think Session Border Controller How can enterprises ensure quick and successful Lync deploy- ment amidst the challenges? The answer is simpler than you may imagine; it’s a Session Border Controller (SBC). The SBC is a device that sits at the border between the internal Lync Enterprise Voice network and the SIP trunk service provided by the Internet service provider (ISP) or a legacy Internet protocol (IP) telephony infrastructure, providing a host of security, service enable- ment, and control functions for any VoIP or UC network. The SBC— which Microsoft recommends be included in a Lync Enterprise Voice Deployment to ensure interoperability and functionality— provides interworking across different protocols, dial plans and media types to enable that migration story to be realized by enterprises while also ensuring security, connectivity, interoperability and survivability. The SBC provides interworking across different protocols, dial plans and media types to enable that migration story to be realized by enterprises while also ensuring security, connectivity, interoperability and survivability.
  11. 11. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind 1 1P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® AN ENCOUNTER WITH A LYNC MASTER is a rare experience. There are only about 100 of them on the planet and most of them work for Microsoft. The Lync Master Certification process starts by winnowing out all but the top Lync specialists, and then it gets serious. Should candidates get past the grueling interview process, they will be invited to Redmond for an intensive 3-week certification program, where the world’s leading Lync experts will cram years of information into your brain. Then comes the real work: a two-part written and lab exam that only one in three students will pass to become a certified master. Most systems integrators would love to have one Lync Master on staff. ExtraTeam has four. That’s right. In a company with 50 employees, you can’t swing a Polycom phone at either of ExtraTeam’s coastal offices without hitting someone who knows a boatload about Lync. ExtraTeam’s Director of Engineering and longest-standing Lync Master Mike Sneeringer has some words of advice that can connect you to a higher consciousness of Lync. Prepare. According to Lync Master Mike, communication is only as strong as the network that supports it. “Have a network assessment done to accurately identify potential problems and challenges before you start to implement Lync. Businesses first need to make sure their network has sufficient bandwidth, security and the right quality of service (QoS) policies to support a unified communications solution.” Partner. For UC to work, everything needs to work together: Lync servers, gateways, phones, legacy applications. “You want to work with 5 WORDS OF WISDOM FROM A ZEN LYNC MASTER a systems integrator who can not only get all of the pieces to play together,” says Sneeringer, “but also knows how to exploit all of Lync’s features to give you the best possible experience.” Equip. It’s one of the most common mistakes that Sneeringer and his ExtraTeam mates see: companies that fail to realize the full potential of Lync because they don’t invest in the right equipment. As Mike explains it, “Companies won’t get optimal voice and video from Lync unless they also invest in certified phones, headsets and cameras.” Simplify. Unifying communications isn’t as simple as SIP trunking. “Different vendors implement SIP in their products differently,” Mike cautions, “so you need a Session Border Controller to provide the interoperability between telephony services. Otherwise, something like music on hold might not work with Lync. That’s why we recommend Lync-certified SBCs. They’ll ultimately speed up your deployment and you’ll spend less time on the phone with tech support.” Train. According to Master Mike, training is the first step to success. “Companies need to make sure that employees have access to training right from the beginning, whether in person or over the Web. If you can deliver a positive experience to users right in the beginning, they’ll embrace it and you’ll start to see those productivity gains almost immediately.” VIDEO: Learn how Lync can improve collaboration capabilities from a single portal. }
  12. 12. Introduction 1. Optimize Your Network 2. Simplify Migration 3. Peace of Mind 1 2P L AY B O O K sonus.net ® The SBC plays a big role in a Lync Enterprise Voice deployment; it sits on the edge of the network and provides all sorts of security and mediation services to keep things running smoothly. It communicates between two network end devices, such as a Lync SIP VoIP call between two phones. These communications are called SIP sessions. Because of where the SBC fits in the network, it can be usefully implemented by both businesses themselves and also by the service providers who serve them. Take note of these key criteria when considering an SBC for your UC deployment. 1. WIDE-RANGING MEDIA SUPPORT Sonus SBCs provide a wide range of support for different media types because they don’t rely on off-the-shelf solutions (with generic off-the- shelf software) for media processing. Instead, Sonus creates its own firmware, which allows Sonus to responsively add additional media types as needed without waiting for a vendor to come along with a solution. 2. MULTIVENDOR INTEROPERABILITY Sonus SBCs are deployed throughout the world in a variety of environ- ments, supporting Lync Enterprise Voice and a wide range of IP-PBXs and legacy TDM-PBX systems in different configurations. 3. RESILIENCY AND PROTECTION AGAINST ATTACKS Sonus SBCs offer sophisticated real-time firewalling and the use of tech- niques such as Virtual LAN (VLAN) tagging, which drops the malicious packets and allows legitimate traffic to continue on to the network unim- peded. So the enterprise stays online and productive! 4. ENCRYPTED COMMUNICATIONS With a Sonus SBC and its support for AES encryption (128 bit), potential eavesdroppers aren’t able to make head or tail of a conversation they might be able to otherwise listen in on. 5. RAPID RECOVERY Sonus SBCs are built to make the disruption of an outage a minor Finding the Right SBC for Your Lync Deployment: Things to Look For rather than a major event. If a failure occurs, the Sonus SBC automati- cally attempts to find alternate routes to complete calls without the end-user ever knowing that there’s a problem. In branch sites, the Sonus SBC can automatically reroute calls to the PSTN when the IP network goes down, giving the user the service needed without disruption. 6. SURVIVABILITY FOR BRANCH SITES Sonus SBCs include full support for Lync SBA. In fact, Sonus takes this one step further and supports full Lync Enhanced SBA with 3G/4G failover capability. So an enterprise’s branch sites get high-quality voice services, ready-to-go survivability and require one less device in the network—that makes the network simpler and cheaper to provision and manage. 7. CENTRALIZED POLICY MANAGEMENT Sonus SBCs can be centrally managed. Whether an enterprise (or service provider) needs two SBCs or 20, a single set of policies and configurations can be established one time and sent to all locations with one action, which means lower expenses for IT and better/faster results for users. This streamlining also eliminates the need to hire IT technologists to main- tain and update policies. 8. EXCEPTIONAL TRANSCODING PERFORMANCE Often voice calls aren’t in the same codec, such as when in languages a translator or in UC a transcoder is needed to convert between the two. The Sonus SBC platform has a separate processing architecture of media transcoding and transrating, so the overall performance of the SBC doesn’t take a “hit” when a lot of processor-intensive transcoding is going on. 9. MICROSOFT COMPATIBILITY AND QUALIFICATION Sonus is a qualified Microsoft Lync hardware partner and has several models of SBCs qualified for use in a Lync Enterprise Voice environment. Sonus is a global leader in IP networking with proven expertise in delivering se- cure, reliable and scalable next-generation infra- structure and subscriber solutions. Sonus has the broadest portfolio of Micro- soft Lync qualified Session Border Controllers (SBCs), providing the industry's only end-to-end portfolio to deliver SIP-enabled ap- plications from the branch office to the central office. For more information, call +1-855-GO-SONUS or visit www.sonus.net

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ENTERPRISES ARE STANDING AT A CROSSROADS AND COMMUNICATION IS KEY TO SUCCESS. In today’s highly competitive, global marketplace. Executives need to make decisions quickly, but information and employees are spread out in many different locations. To operate efficiently, businesses need fast, simple ways to exchange data. As a result, many enterprises stand at an important crossroad. They have invested large sums in legacy Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) network voice infrastructures that do not easily support modern Unified Communications (UC) solutions, such as the increasingly popular Microsoft Lync. “About 70% of businesses are now using Lync in some fashion,” states Irwin Lazar, Vice President and Service Director for The Nemertes Research Group, Inc. “Most of these companies use it for instant messaging, web conferencing, and voice/video chat. A small but growing percentage are using it to replace or augment their PBXs.” In addition to delivering new communication options, Unified Commu- nications delivers other benefits. By leaving behind their legacy PBX and moving ahead to a new Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) network infrastructure, businesses reduce their capital expenditure (CapEx) and lower their ongoing maintenance requirements, which can decrease their operating expenditure (OpEx) by as much as 50%. The transition from the old to the new works with the right network infrastructure. Enterprises need one that is rock solid. “Today, businesses simply cannot tolerate downtime,” says James Rodd, Co-Founder and Managing Director at Modality Systems, Unified Communications specialists. Businesses must also have a way to integrate their traditional systems with new, modern functions. Finally, they need a solution that offers robust security, so corporate data is protected as it travels from location to location. To deliver such functionality, enterprises need a Session Border Controller (SBC) that works in conjunction with Lync to enable the delivery of sophisticated voice, data, and video services to enterprise users.

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