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High rise residential buildings 
Surya teja 
Lahari 
Harika
Distribution of annual energy consumption in 
simulated typical building, kWh/m2/year and 
13% 2% 
11% 
16% 
17% 
9% 
15% ...
Case studies 
6 remez tower 
Tree house residence hall
6 remez tower 
Location 
Tel Aviv 
Completion 
2012 
Height 
118 m (387 ft) 
Stories 
32 
Primary Use 
Residential 
Struct...
This is the first time that a tower façade has been entirely covered with an 
aluminum wire mesh, which also serves to con...
Plan and elevation
Tree House Residence Hall 
Location 
Boston 
Completion 
2012 
Height 
85 m (280 ft) 
Stories 
21 
Primary Use 
Residentia...
The exterior is an organic mosaic of over 5,000 composite aluminum panels of varying 
depths and hues. Dark browns at the ...
plan
Elevation and interiors 
Main lobby 
lounge
Water conservation in high rise building 
1. Xeriscaping is a landscape technique that reduces/eliminates the need for irr...
Electrochromic Windows 
• Electrochromic (EC) windows are an emerging technology that allows the 
transparency level of th...
Bird safe building 
The greatest danger to birds comes from unarticulated, highly-glazed buildings adjacent to 
water, wet...
Photovoltaic 
glass
Building automation system(BAS) 
Generally, building automation begins with control of mechanical, electrical, and plumbin...
Most of the automation system is behind the scenes as hardware devices mounted to 
equipment or hidden underfloor or in th...
High rise residential building
High rise residential building
High rise residential building
High rise residential building
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High rise residential building

high rise residential buildings

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High rise residential building

  1. 1. High rise residential buildings Surya teja Lahari Harika
  2. 2. Distribution of annual energy consumption in simulated typical building, kWh/m2/year and 13% 2% 11% 16% 17% 9% 15% 17% percentage equipmentand amenity elevators electric baseboard heating fire places or A/c ventilation DHW lights plug and appliances
  3. 3. Case studies 6 remez tower Tree house residence hall
  4. 4. 6 remez tower Location Tel Aviv Completion 2012 Height 118 m (387 ft) Stories 32 Primary Use Residential Structural Material concrete The 6 Remez tower is an unusual residential tower in several aspects. Perhaps most striking is its structural system, which uses an off-center core and minimal interior columns, a design move more common to office buildings, so as to afford wide, sweeping views to occupants and maximum flexibility for tenant improvements. The core has two lobbies on each typical floor. The front lobby acts as a reception area, which can be considered an extension of the apartments themselves, while the second lobby is located in the back for service purposes. This concept enhances firefighter safety, by defining the back lobby as a safe deployment space on each floor.
  5. 5. This is the first time that a tower façade has been entirely covered with an aluminum wire mesh, which also serves to conceal the VRV (Variable Refrigerant Volume) system located in each apartment on the eastern side of the tower. A new curtain wall system was developed for this project. This system includes an inward-opening window integrated into a structural curtain wall system. This specific detail played a crucial part in shaping the overall appearance of the structural curtain wall, which also incorporates shades in the spandrels as well as in the vision glass. The low-E coating complements the shading system, while low-iron exterior glass affords thermal values appropriate to the hot climate. Electronically operated Venetian blinds complete the protective system. The effect of all these elements working together creates a unique texture for the whole towerThe project includes a small park north of the tower. Plantings in the park are located strategically so as to minimize undesirable wind effects from the tower for park users. With a subtle entrance via the garden, rather than directly from the street, the park is open to the public at all times. Its landscape design is based upon the typology of a leaf in plan view, and features reflecting and biological pools. The arrangement of the basement, car park and overall building footprint leave 20 percent of the plot free of built structures or hardscapes.
  6. 6. Plan and elevation
  7. 7. Tree House Residence Hall Location Boston Completion 2012 Height 85 m (280 ft) Stories 21 Primary Use Residential Structural Material steel This new residential tower results from a highly unusual collaborative process and responds to the unique living/learning requirements of art school students. Inspired by Gustav Klimt’s painting Tree of Life, this innovative high-rise includes 493 beds for freshmen and sophomores in 136 suites configured in one-, two-, or three-bedroom layouts. The building features a ground-floor café and living room, a second-floor health center, and a “Pajama Floor” at the third level with communal kitchen, game room, laundry facilities, and fitness center. Studio spaces alternate with lounges on the 17 upper floors.
  8. 8. The exterior is an organic mosaic of over 5,000 composite aluminum panels of varying depths and hues. Dark browns at the base mirror tree bark before growing progressively lighter to make the building appear taller and lighter in the skyline. Green window panels punctuate the façade like the leaves of a tree. The building received a Silver LEED certification from the U.S. Green Building Council and its energy usage is 22 percent more efficient than code mandates. Other green features include double-insulated metal panels, and low-flow plumbing fixtures that reduce the amount of potable water usage by 33 percent. More than 50 percent of the material used in the residential hall has recycled content, 20 percent from local sources, and 70 percent of the wood is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council.
  9. 9. plan
  10. 10. Elevation and interiors Main lobby lounge
  11. 11. Water conservation in high rise building 1. Xeriscaping is a landscape technique that reduces/eliminates the need for irrigation. Common xeriscape strategies include planting native and adaptive plants that require less water, pesticides and fertilizer. 2. Efficient Irrigation Technologies can reduce the amount of water used for irrigation. a. Drip irrigation is 90% efficient compared to conventional sprinklers, which are only 60% efficient, as they lose a lot of water to wind. b. Another efficient irrigation technology that we recommend employing is the useof reclaimed water. Reclaimed water for irrigation purposes can drastically reduce the pressure on municipally supplied potable water. Sources of reclaimed water include: captured rainwater, graywater, or municipally supplied reclaimed water. The latter option is not currently used in San Francisco; however, the infrastructure exists and may be used in the future. 3. StormwaterManagement is a problem in urban areas with significant impervious areas. Impervious materials prevent the infiltration of water after a storm; water instead rushes offsite. This runoff is a significant threat to water quality due to contamination with chemicals. In response, we recommend the following: a. The minimization of stormwater runoff through increased vegetated surfaces on the ground level, permeable pavers where appropriate, and runoff-capturing landscape features such as rain gardens or bioswales. b. The installation of the greatest percentage of greenery possible on the roof of the building. A vegetated roof will slow down the runoff rate as the plants absorb the water and reduce the burden on the municipal stormwater system. c. The inclusion of green walls or vegetated structures attached to vertical surfaces that can slow runoff rates and provide aesthetic interest.
  12. 12. Electrochromic Windows • Electrochromic (EC) windows are an emerging technology that allows the transparency level of the glass to be altered. Smart glass controls the amount of light transmission. When activated, the glass changes from transparent to translucent, blocking some wavelengths of light. Smart glass can save costs for heating, air-conditioning and lighting and avoid the cost of installing and maintaining motorized light screens or blinds or curtains. Most smart glass blocks ultraviolet light, reducing fabric fading; for SPD-type smart glass, this is achieved in conjunction with low emissivity coatings.
  13. 13. Bird safe building The greatest danger to birds comes from unarticulated, highly-glazed buildings adjacent to water, wetlands, or green open space larger than one acre. The following is recommended to mitigate bird strikes: Reduce glass reflectivity: no glazing on building shall have a “Reflectivity Out” coefficient exceeding 30%. Treat or select glass with a “visual noise barrier” for at least 95% of the collision zone, defined as the ground floor up to 40 feet. A visual noise barrier is defined as fritting, permanent stencils, frosted glass, exterior screens, UV patterns visible to birds, or an equivalent treatment approved by a qualified biologist. Building-integrated photovoltaic glass, such as Pythagoras glass, may also qualify as a visual noise barrier. Night lighting:- Night lighting on tall buildings can disorient and “trap” nocturnally migrating birds, causing death due to collision or exhaustion,Avoid uses of uplighting that spills light into the night sky, including upward-facing spotlights on roof; instead, use shielded lighting that is aimed downwards at the targeted area. Avoid the use of red-colored lighting; instead, use blue or green lighting.
  14. 14. Photovoltaic glass
  15. 15. Building automation system(BAS) Generally, building automation begins with control of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) systems. For instance, the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system is almost always controlled, including control of its various pieces of equipment such as: Chillers Boilers Air Handling Units (AHUs) Roof-top Units (RTUs) Fan Coil Units (FCUs) Heat Pump Units (HPUs) Variable Air Volume boxes (VAVs) Lighting control is, likewise, low-hanging fruit for optimizing building performance. Other systems that are often controlled and/or brought under a complete automation system include: Power monitoring Security Close circuit video (CCTV) Card and keypad access Fire alarm system Elevators/escalators Plumbing and water monitoring
  16. 16. Most of the automation system is behind the scenes as hardware devices mounted to equipment or hidden underfloor or in the ceiling. Some personalized control can be made available through thermostat-like devices. From a central management perspective, the BAS resides as software on an operator workstation (computer) or is available as a web page. Various types of “controllers” manage equipment and portions of the network. “Sensors” provide input data to the controllers.

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