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Making the Right Career Move by The Dahill Group

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Making the Right Career Move by The Dahill Group

http://www.thedahillgroup.com | Please visit our website to download.

Today’s fast-paced energy industry presents a world of career opportunities for the ambitious professional, however; highly-coveted positions come with great competition. So, how does one position oneself to compete in such a dynamic and evolving environment? In her presentation, industry-insider, Founder and CEO, Elizabeth Dahill taps into her extensive energy experience to discuss what skills, attributes and undertakings are needed to find the next great career move.

http://www.thedahillgroup.com | Please visit our website to download.

Today’s fast-paced energy industry presents a world of career opportunities for the ambitious professional, however; highly-coveted positions come with great competition. So, how does one position oneself to compete in such a dynamic and evolving environment? In her presentation, industry-insider, Founder and CEO, Elizabeth Dahill taps into her extensive energy experience to discuss what skills, attributes and undertakings are needed to find the next great career move.

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Making the Right Career Move by The Dahill Group

  1. 1. Elizabeth Dahill, The Dahill Group MAKING THE RIGHT CAREER MOVE
  2. 2. Millennials/ Gen Y: Born between 1980-2000 • The average time in service at any one company for Millennials is currently 2 years • Only one-third of Millennials say their current job is their career. • By 2025, Millennials will make up most of the workforce. Traditionalists/ Silent Generation (born before 1946) Baby Boomers: (born 1946-1964) Generation X (born 1965-1980) Generation Y/ Millennials (born 1980-2000)
  3. 3. GETTING AHEAD VS. GETTING A NEW ROLE
  4. 4. WHICH CHOICE IS RIGHT FOR YOU? Getting Ahead - How to increase your internal opportunities: moving up in your current company - More experience - Showing leadership capabilities - Building relationships within the company, having strong connections with the right people Getting A New Role - Are you ready to make the change, and what will it take? - It’s worth the risk if you make an educated, carefully considered decision - Make a plan A, B, and C - The decision to make a change is not always easy. You are faced with unknowns, you are out of your comfort zone, and uncertain if you have what it takes to leverage your experience and background in a new setting. - Offers multiple avenues to learn and grow
  5. 5. What does it take in today’s competitive market? Adapting to the changing environment Networking, Your Personal Brand Resumes, Effective Interviewing Dos and Don’ts of Social Media
  6. 6. Networking, Your Personal Brand
  7. 7. Networking is the number one job search strategy. People do business with those they like and trust.
  8. 8. Networking events should be laid back, fun and offer a great environment to discuss business without making it feel like work. Face-to-FaceNetworking However, Face-to-Face Networking STILL Trumps Social Networking It’s all about making lasting relationships. -Build your own style for networking, and be genuine. “What do you do?” is the networking equivalent of, “Do you come here often?” Networking does not have to mean a stiff conversation accompanied with the exchange of business cards.
  9. 9. NETWORKING TIPS o Be professional & polite. o What’s your story? If you have a memorable story to use when introducing yourself to others, you’ll greatly increase the chances of them remembering you by sharing your story with others. o Make a positive impression- have an upbeat attitude, but remember to be genuine. o Extend yourself. o Focus on quality, not quantity- focus on the quality of your connections, rather than making as many connections as possible. Remember one thing that you talked about with each person you meet. o Like likes like- try to make connections with people that have similar interests as you. o Really listen. o Offer help. Even if they decline, they will appreciate your willingness and will be more likely to want to help you in return.
  10. 10. • Most jobs are found through networking.
  11. 11. Upwards of 35-40% of all positions are not posted on a website or channeled through recruiters.
  12. 12. Resumes, Effective Interviewing
  13. 13. What does a good résumé look like? Even if you do all of these things right and your networking skills are exceptional, you’ve got to have your résumé up to par, or you still won’t get the interview.
  14. 14. Résumé Key Points Well written resumes: o Chronological/ functional are both fine o Bullet points vs. paragraphs are preferred o Include accomplishments at each job o Start & end dates should include month and year o Written in first person o Academics- must include year you graduated Do NOT: o Tell your life story or data dump everything onto your resume o Forget that you should include job duties and responsibilities with each position you held o Write your resume in 3rd person o Forget to double check for typos and grammar errors o Leave off dates on graduation year o Have a disorganized, or odd font that is difficult to read o Try to go past 2 pages
  15. 15. GOOD RÉSUMÉ Jane J. Seeker SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS Senior Executive with EPA recognized as outstanding leader, technical advisor, and negotiator in complex water and soil matters. Reformed and improved programs: Water, Superfund, RCRA, Brownfields, TSCA, and Pesticides. Balanced perspective ensured successful negotiations with many diverse interests groups such as state and local governments, corporations, attorneys, environmental groups and the public. Recognized for outstanding skill in working across organizations to develop integrated strategies to accomplish the mission. EXPERIENCE U S ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 1977-2013 Director for Energy, Hartford Regional EPA Office 2011-2013 · Responsible for policies and program implementation for energy-related areas such as mining and oil and gas production. · Worked with regional managers and State directors to incorporate protecting water quality in the permits. · Through technical training classes to one-on-one permit reviews, over 500 State mining permits were improved and the States were able to overcome previous perception barriers to systematic change and enhanced their internal regulations, policies and models. · Worked with the business sector on Marcellus Shale implementation helping CT and MD understand technical issues and solutions leading to stronger State regulations rather than imposing federal regulations. · Conducted review of underground injection well permits, drinking water contamination and water treatment permits to assess technical improvements needed due to varying practices in the oil and gas sector. · My leadership with this industry sector has protected countless aquifers, drinking water supplies, and provided a streamlined regulatory environment. Director, Water Permits Division, Headquarters in New York City 2004-2011 · Senior Executive responsible for the development and implementation of the NPDES Clean Water Act program. · Developed regulations, policies, technical guidance, oversight policies and training for State and Regional permit authorities. Developed permits incorporating new regulations and policies including establishment of best technologies/practices for the regional and State use (CAFOs, Pesticides, Water Transfers, Oil and Gas, Construction Stormwater, Industrial Stormwater and Vessels). · Regulations were challenged in court and some went to the US Supreme Court for resolution. · Division worked with numerous stakeholder organizations including Congress, State, local government, industry and environmental groups to improve policies, procedures, to understand field and industry practices and strengthening State and regional NPDES programs. · Initiated and lead the integrity assessment of all State CWA programs. Cross agency effort linking permitting, water quality, inspections and enforcement. Deputy Director, Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis, Headquarters in New York City 2001-2004 · Senior executive providing leadership and direction for EPA’s strategic planning, the annual report, budget investments and disinvestments and management integrity. By shifting the process to emphasize measurable outcomes, the EPA Annual Report quality rating rose from 15 to 4 among other Departments and Agencies. Director, Site Remediation Enforcement Division, Headquarters in New York City 1998-2000 · Provided leadership and direction for Superfund, RCRA Corrective Action, Oil Pollution and Underground Storage Tanks enforcement. · Reformed Superfund and RCRA programs to assure they were faster, fairer and more efficient. improving the speed of the Superfund program such that final cleanups have increased from 6 to 600 sites. · Developed policies to increase fairness in the Superfund and Brownfields’s program including the Orphan Share Policy (EPA pays up to 25%), Prospective Purchases Agreement policy (EPA won’t hold you liable), and predictable billing system for industry cost recovery payments. By listening to stakeholder concerns and adjusting policies, the pace of negotiations, settlements and cleanups was expedited, redevelopment proceeded, cost recovery into the trust fund increased, and Superfund was removed from the government’s integrity risk list. · EPA’s biggest critics no longer sought legislative reform and instead stated that the Agency had successfully revised their program administratively. Supervisor to Acting Director, Site Remediation Enforcement Division, New York City 1988-1998 · Supervised selection of appropriate site remediation techniques for industry and federal facility cleanups under the Superfund Program with a $65 M budget and 65 staff. · Developed enforcement and site remediation policies, tools and models to speed cleanup, enhance remedy selection, and increased private party cleanup from 39 to 70% · The remediation compendium was used by EPA and State officials during the remedy selection process and all litigation was settled or developed within the new statutory deadlines. · I was asked to do two special projects – developing and distributing 500 new positions for Superfund Cleanups across the Agency and to lead a team on how to reinvent Superfund. The base review and redistribution of priorities and positions from the budget detail set the platform for the next 10 years in Superfund. Environmental Engineer, Site Remediation, Headquarters in New York City 1985-1988 · Technical advisor for remedy selection and laboratory analysis · National Contract Project Officer for site remediation and environmental investigations for contamination in soil, surface water or groundwater ($168M contract covering half the country for EPA remediation projects). Site Remediation Section Chief, Denver EPA Regional Office 1985 · Doubled the sites within the Region on the National Priority List for Superfund Site Remediation Hazardous Waste Enforcement Compliance Officer, Denver EPA Regional Office 1982 · Negotiated, collected and drafted the compliance agreement for the first penalty in Hazardous Waste Program in Denver office. · Compliance officer/inspector oil refineries, mining sites, large federal facilities and other industrial facilities for environmental compliance with Hazardous Waste regulations. Environmental Engineer, Hartford Regional EPA Office 1980-1982 · Superfund Remedial Project Manager and technical advisor to 500 contaminated sites · Inspector - Water, TSCA , SPCC and spill response EDUCATION: · B.S. – Chemical Engineer, Full Sail University, Hartford, CT 1981 · Senior Executive Service Training; Harvard Women and Power Seminar for Executives. · Approximately 1000 hours of training on leadership, public speaking, negotiations, budgeting, and environmental program courses (water quality standards, permitting, drinking water, pesticides, hazardous waste, site remediation, and emergency response).
  16. 16. BAD RÉSUMÉ Objective To obtain and secure a position in a fast paced law firm that will allow me to continue to grow and learn Experience June, 2013 – April, 2014 Bachus & Schanker, LLC Litigation Paralegal · Phones · Client Service · Calendaring · Docketing · Discovery · Pleadings · E-filing · Negotiations · Trial Prep/Trial August, 2009- March 2013 Wingfield Inc. Customer Service/ Administrative Assistant · Inbound call · Scheduling · Filing May, 2009- August 2009 Colorado State Capitol Tour Guide (summer staff) · Capitol historical tours · Phones inbound/outbound · Sales · Greeter June, 2007–February, 2008 Colorado State Public Defenders Office Paralegal Intern · Client contact · Legal research/Analysis · Managing Discovery · Transcription Education 2006–2009 Community College of Denver · A.A.S. Degree · Paralegal Certificate 2009-2012 University of Colorado at Denver · BA Degree Skills Clerical, Data entry, 60 wpm+, 30,000 K.S.P.H., Phones, Client services, Microsoft Software /Systems, Updating/Collating files, E-filing, LexisNexis, Westlaw, Trialworks, File it, Troubleshooting, Legal research/Analysis, Legal Writing, Proofreading, Calendaring, Docketing, Pleadings, Discovery, Trial
  17. 17. You got all the way to the interview! Why is is that so many prospective employees do not seem to grasp the essentials of getting the interviewer to connect with them and make a commitment to hire them? 10 COMMON FAULTS OF INTERVIEWING.
  18. 18. Do not be unprepared. ç The Interview Do not go casual. Do not be afraid to ask questions. Do not use clichés. Do not trash your current employer. çDo not be late, OR too early
  19. 19. Do not be fake. The Interview Do not chit chat. Do not be evasive. Do not talk money. Do not just walk away.
  20. 20. Behavioral Interviewing • Interviewing styles have changed. Today, behavioral interviewing is what is typically used: using your past as an indicator of how you will perform in the future. • Did you notice in the job description that the company listed skills/experience terms such as “strategic leader” or “customer focus”. If so, before your interview, think of a time or a few examples in your past in which you were recognized or stood out for your strategic approach as a leader or perhaps outstanding customer service. Be prepared to share that example, provide details etc.
  21. 21. Dos and Don’ts of Social Media
  22. 22. • You can do all of the above correctly, but if you don’t have it all pulled together, your social media profile could be a deal breaker. KNOW THE REALITY AND FACTS OF SOCIAL MEDIA.
  23. 23. Recruiters and hiring managers spend less than 30 seconds looking at your resume. Equally, your LinkedIn profile may also get 30 seconds of viewing. However, you can use LinkedIn to give yourself more leeway to display your accomplishments, skills, and previous job history, while sharing ideas to attract recruiters’ attention. Set Yourself Apart, Present a Clear Picture of Who You Are
  24. 24. Do’s and Don’ts for Your LinkedIn Profile • Do have a somewhat professional picture • Do not put up a party picture or picture of you in a group setting • Do define what you do under your name, i.e. Attorney , Drilling Engineer, Sr Landman, Financial Analysis, CFO Butterfly Drilling Company, • Do provide a summary • Do outline skills and experience • Do provide the title of the positions you have held • Do not download or data dump your resume • Do not just list the companies you have worked for
  25. 25. Bad LinkedIn Profile:
  26. 26. Good LinkedIn Profile:
  27. 27. PROFILE PICTURE DON’TS: Yes, we do look at your social media profiles.
  28. 28. Go to events, talk about your intentions, get to know people in your target area and outside of your own company. It’s about building a network that will help you establish a broad base of potential new opportunities. Share relevant content with your connections outside of your company.
  29. 29. Elizabeth Dahill, The Dahill Group

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