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Please carefully review your Digital Proof download for formatting,
grammar, and design issues that may need to be correct...
TransformTeaching.org2
Copyright © 2014 by Enrique Gonzalez. The lists of questions from
StoryCorps.org appear here for “f...
TransformTeaching.org4
Part 2 is the Global Skills or “seven
survival skills” that Harvard professor Tony
Wagner has writt...
TransformTeaching.org6
Please do me a favor. Click on the following links:
www.TransformTeaching.org
www.TinyURL.com/Fisch...
TransformTeaching.org8
The students write their memories.
And they become authors.
Yes, their books are
published on
Amazo...
TransformTeaching.org10
g) My personal firsts page
The first time I crossed a busy street
The first time I used a telephon...
TransformTeaching.org12
A personal history book
This project can take a good student about four weeks to
complete….
Worksh...
TransformTeaching.org14
Worksheet 2:
Create a map of my ancestors
Person: __________________
Comments
Personal History Pro...
TransformTeaching.org16
Worksheet 2:
Create a map of my ancestors
Person: _________________
Comments:
Where did your relat...
TransformTeaching.org18
A personal history book
This project can take a good student about four weeks to
complete….
Worksh...
TransformTeaching.org20
AUTOBIOGRAPHY by answering questions (choose some of these questions
and write, and write, and wri...
TransformTeaching.org22
• Do you have any favorite stories about your kids?
PARENTS
• Do you remember what was going throu...
TransformTeaching.org24
WORKING
• What do you do for a living?
• Tell me about how you got into your line of work.
• Do yo...
TransformTeaching.org26
• What about _____ makes you smile?
• What was your relationship like?
• What did _____ look like?...
TransformTeaching.org28
A personal history book
This project can take a good student about four weeks to
complete….
Worksh...
TransformTeaching.org30
A personal history book
This project can take a good student about four weeks to
complete….
Worksh...
TransformTeaching.org32
A personal history book
This project can take a good student about four weeks to
complete….
Worksh...
TransformTeaching.org34
Example
Personal	
  History	
  Project	
  
	
  
Frantz	
  Saintil	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
 ...
TransformTeaching.org36
I	
  suppose	
  this	
  should	
  contain	
  only	
  the	
  most	
  memorable	
  and	
  defining	
...
TransformTeaching.org38
and	
  old	
  age,	
  he	
  was	
  annoying	
  and	
  playful.	
  I	
  met	
  other	
  family	
  m...
TransformTeaching.org40
and	
  she's	
  been	
  a	
  diabetic	
  since	
  before	
  I	
  was	
  born,	
  which	
  made	
  ...
TransformTeaching.org42
Inspiring	
  people	
  in	
  my	
  life	
  1:	
  
Dante	
  Alighieri	
  
Before	
  I	
  took	
  it...
TransformTeaching.org44
glided	
  across	
  the	
  backyard,	
  but	
  without	
  the	
  power	
  of	
  real	
  muscles,	
...
TransformTeaching.org46
Everything	
  I	
  now	
  know	
  of	
  life	
  and	
  pain,	
  things	
  that	
  my	
  "beloved"	...
TransformTeaching.org48
POINTS SHEET for Frantz
Frantz selected some of the projects to complete. [o] indicates a project ...
TransformTeaching.org50
This	
  is	
  how	
  the	
  “share	
  menu”	
  looks:	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Hear	
  Olivier’s	
  comm...
TransformTeaching.org52
b) Approach a teacher with the idea: BUT DON’T TALK
ABOUT IT. Take time to put your idea into writ...
TransformTeaching.org54
The Twelve Global Skills
Tony Wagner
Can we take the initiative? Can we begin something?
Dr. Danie...
TransformTeaching.org56
Learn how to set up a “Business” on Google+
https://support.google.com/business/answer/4566606?hl=...
TransformTeaching.org58
Can we build our “resilience”?
Here is an article about a graph.
A second article gives a list of ...
TransformTeaching.org60
Project about “Hardships”
What hardships or difficulties have you experienced?
How did several of ...
TransformTeaching.org62
From BIBPenpals.com
Many students in the USA need service hours to show that they have helped in
t...
TransformTeaching.org64
That’s the end of Part Two
The Twelve Global Skills
Now let’s go to the next part…
Part Three
We A...
TransformTeaching.org66
Read Mr. Pink’s Flip Manifesto.
The segment about “finding your passion” is intriguing because it ...
TransformTeaching.org68
Project: What is the Jedi Mind Trick?
What does Dan Pink recommend?
Search “Dan Pink Jedi Mind Tri...
TransformTeaching.org70
A Short Summary of Dan Pink’s first five books
In July 2005 I received a book from Marshal Thurber...
TransformTeaching.org72
Drive (2009) asks
“What motivates us?”
(in addition to money).
After we get enough to
cover our ne...
TransformTeaching.org74
Send comments to VisualAndActve@gmail.com and
TheEbookman@gmail.com. Call me at (954) 646 8246
Sen...
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Education personal history ebook by Enrique Gonzalez, former principal

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The Personal History Workbook by Enrique Gonzalez lets students learn history backwards. Start with something relevant and work byack to the Egyptians.

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Education personal history ebook by Enrique Gonzalez, former principal

  1. 1. Please carefully review your Digital Proof download for formatting, grammar, and design issues that may need to be corrected. We recommend that you review your book three times, with each time focusing on a different aspect. Once you are satisfied with your review, you can approve your proof and move forward to the next step in the publishing process. To print this proof we recommend that you scale the PDF to fit the size of your printer paper. Check the format, including headers, footers, page numbers, spacing, table of contents, and index. Review any images or graphics and captions if applicable. Read the book for grammatical errors and typos. 1 2 3 Digital Proofer Personal History Wor... Authored by Enrique Gonzalez 8.5" x 11.0" (21.59 x 27.94 cm) Black & White on White paper 74 pages ISBN-13: 9781502723765 ISBN-10: 150272376X Personal History Workbook Enrique Gonzalez Prepared by Steve McCrea BONUS: “Twelve Global Skills” and “We Are All Salespeople” TransformTeaching.org
  2. 2. TransformTeaching.org2 Copyright © 2014 by Enrique Gonzalez. The lists of questions from StoryCorps.org appear here for “fair use” educational purposes. ISBN-13: 978-1502723765 ISBN-10: 150272376X You are encouraged to share your suggestions for more projects. This is an abridged version of the Personal History Workbook that Enrique’s students use at Highland Park High School in Los Angeles. The poster on the title page of the book comes from a series of ten questions that appear in LeavingToLearn.org. Part One Personal History Workbook Part Two The Twelve Global Skills Can we take the initiative? Can we begin something? Can we handle our “automatic negative thoughts”? Can we build our “resilience”? Cab we build a global network? Are we ready to work in the Global Economy? Do we have contacts on the five continents? Can we put thoughts in our heads by using quotations? Part Three We Are All Salespeople Can we “pitch” a product or service? What is Your Net Impact? What is your impact on the Internet? We can get whatever we want if we help enough other people get what they want. – Zig Ziglar Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 3 A Letter to Students and Teachers I invite students to jump into this book and skip this page. Just get started with a project. This book was entered into a computer during the week of October 2. Three questions have been haunting me since I visited “Can you give me a project?” “Can you find me a job?” “Can you teach me Spanish?” These questions are central to why I support the Big Picture Learning approach. The aim is to make the high school experience personal to the student. Build the curriculum around the interests of each student. The Personal Learning Plan for each student should be unique. I’ve spent at least ten hours a year talking by phone with Enrique Gonzalez since I met him at Frida Kahlo High School in Los Angeles on October 24, 2009. It was an “open house” evening and he gave me a tour of his school while a barbecue was in progress, welcoming parents on the campus to get the report cards for their children’s work. I met students who spoke clearly and confidently about where they once were (in gangs) and where they hoped to go (university, music, armed services, private business). I saw then that I would need a workbook to help guide me and my students to follow the path where these confident students were walking. Enrique has freely shared his techniques with me, which is why he is the lead author of this collection of worksheets. The parts that follow Part One are initiatives that some students might want to pursue after completing their Personal History Workbook.
  3. 3. TransformTeaching.org4 Part 2 is the Global Skills or “seven survival skills” that Harvard professor Tony Wagner has written and spoken about. Students are encouraged to spend some time with “seven survival skills Tony Wagner” (go ahead, do the search) and then look at these topics: The Twelve Global Skills Can we take the initiative? Can we begin something? Can we handle our “automatic negative thoughts”? Can we build our “resilience”? Cab we build a global network? Are we ready to work in the Global Economy? Do we have contacts on the five continents? Can we put thoughts in our heads by using quotations? If you are familiar with Daniel Amen’s work, you will recognize some of the concepts here, particularly “brain resilience” and “automatic negative thoughts.” Please take time with Amen’s articles, which are listed as references to read before you tackle some of the worksheets. Part 3 Dan Pink is a board member of Big Picture Learning. I highly recommend his website danpink.com and I hope these words will drive your attention toward his books. In the schools where I work, I set up “Dan Pink Libraries” in classrooms with the hope that students will turn to the pages 28-41 in AWNM and learn about Automation, Asia and Abundance. His series of books since he quit writing speeches for Al Gore have a common thread: how to prepare students for the global economy. Free Agent Nation: We are all free agents. Even if we work at a job, we could benefit if we have an entrepreneurial attitude. Each one of us is “unemployedable” – we can become unemployed quickly. A Whole New Mind (AWNM): What do you see when you look at the Fed Ed logo? We can activate our RIGHT brains by using techniques that Dan Pink has shared in this book, which is ten years old in 2015. The book was selected by Oprah Winfrey as a book of the year. Why not spend five minutes with a copy? Johnny Bunko: a manga (comic) story about a young college graduate who learns how to take the initiative and “leave a mark.” Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 5 Drive: Pinks’ TED talk has over 9 million hits. There’s something to this idea that there are three ways to motivate people after money fails to push people to achieve: autonomy, mastery and purpose. See “RSA Animate Drive Dan Pink” and learn more. To Sell Is Human. I fear selling. I don’t like to make “cold calls.” I see myself as a failure in the realm of selling. I don’t want this fear to infect my students. Then I read Pink’s book and realized that we teachers can do much if we move from the image of the pressure sales technique of ABC (always be closing) to the Pink ABC of Attunement, Buoyancy and Clarity. I invite students to jump into this book and skip my yammering. Just get started with a project. I recommend the free list of projects that Matt Blazek has compiled at www.TinyURL.com/MattBlazek and www.TinyURL.com/BlazekProjects Your Net Impact I have several references to “Your Impact on the Internet.” I encourage you to recommend websites, Facebook accounts and videos that “deserve” more attention. I’m preparing a companion book called tentatively Flip Your Speech: How to Get Your Presentation into the Long-Term Memory of Your Audience. I expect that some of the items that you read here have slipped into that effort, which you can read about at www.TinyURL.com/LittkyMiamiSpanish. The Power of CreateSpace The ultimate goal of this book is to inspire you to interview an older person and ask dozens of questions from the StoryCorps.org list of questions. Go ahead, record the session and then transcribe what the older person said. Create a book. Most of my books are incomplete when I send them to CreateSpace.com. I just want to finish books, so I terminate the process of editing instead of letting the book mature. Perhaps one of my students will ask to tweak and improve the next edition of this book. Please send me your suggestions for the next edition. Steve McCrea Global Skills Instructor VisualAndActive@gmail.com Assembler of books on Createspace.com Maintainer of the website YourNetImpact.com and YourNetEffect.com
  4. 4. TransformTeaching.org6 Please do me a favor. Click on the following links: www.TransformTeaching.org www.TinyURL.com/FischlerPosters www.TinyURL.com/DecemberMuseum Then click on the videos that you see on those pages. Thank you. Finally, subscribe to Dan Pink’s occasional email letter. It’s worth it. http://www.danpink.com/contact/ Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 7 At some schools, there is a “gateway” project called the Personal History Workbook. Before leaving 10th Grade, the students complete an autobiography. They interview their parents, grandparents, uncles, aunts, friends of their families. They ask, “What do you remember about me when I was a young child?”
  5. 5. TransformTeaching.org8 The students write their memories. And they become authors. Yes, their books are published on Amazon.com. How cool. Are you interested? You can get points toward your grades in APEX. Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 9 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. a) The magic in my name F is for Fierce R is for Reasonable A is for Active N is for Nice C is for Considerate I is for Intelligent S is for Sympathetic to animals b) Create a map of my ancestors Where did my extended family come from? Where did they live and where do they live now? c) Family tree The tree shows my parents, their brothers and sisters (my uncles and aunts), my grandparents. For ambitious students: Show the brothers and sisters of my grandparents so I can see who my cousins and other relatives are. For each person, put a sentence about their profession and where they live, when they were born, etc. d) Autobiography Where I was born Where I came from Important events in my life Where I went to school A list of some of my friends and why I like them e) Picture pages Write at least two sentences about each photo (When, where, and why the photo was taken, and how I was feeling) Three photos about my past Three photos about my present Three photos about Tomorrow What I hope to be in the future f) The most inspirational person in my life Write about the person. What inspires you about the person? What does the person do? Tell a story that shows how important that person is in making you who you are.
  6. 6. TransformTeaching.org10 g) My personal firsts page The first time I crossed a busy street The first time I used a telephone The first time I tried a new type of food The first time I lost someone close to me The first time I failed a test (and what I learned about myself) The first time I won a race The first time I lost a race The first time I was hurt The first time I held a baby The first time I rescued an animal If you don’t remember the first time, then change the question: I'm going to write about a time when I rescued an animal. h) Twenty-five things that I want to do in my life (a bucket list) PUBLISH The book is put together in a word document or using OneDrive or Google Drive. OPTIONAL: The book can be available on Amazon (published through CreateSpace.com) Each student keeps a copy of the book The school keeps a copy of the book. If some students do not want their real names used, they can create other names. If students don’t want to publish the book, they can make a PRIVATE selection on CreateSpace and print just two copies of the book: one copy for the school, one copy for themselves and their parents. The copy for the school is used to inspire other students. If you don’t want anybody to see your story, then only one copy is made on Createspace.org, just for you. Students in Los Angeles complete this project as a requirement before receiving their high school diplomas. You can learn more by writing to the Principal, Enrique Gonzalez. SPECIAL INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS in Florida Credit in APEX There are several places where credit is shown: “Extra Credit” and in the “Direct Instruction” section of the Course Ticket. Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 11 Write to the students in California to get inspired. Example: Dear Mr. Gonzalez exg0368@lausd.net I heard about the Personal History Book. I am a student in Florida and I want to make a similar book. I’d like to contact one of your students to learn more about how their project worked. Maybe I can email or talk on the phone or text or communicate on Facebook. My contact information is: Facebook.com/TheGuideOntheSide VisualandActive@gmail.com My phone number is (954) 646 8246 I’m ____ years old, I live in Oakland Park, Florida and I plan to go into the military someday. I want to see what a Personal History book looks like form one of your students. Can you send me a copy as an ebook? I have some questions. I’d like to contact some students who have completed this project in your school. I would like to share my Personal History book with some of your students and I’d like to read their histories. Can you connect me to some of your students? Sincerely, John Cook, Student in Florida VisualandActive@gmail.com Questions? Write to Enrique at exg0368@lausd.net OPTION: Another section of the project (if you want it) The Bible is Literature: Some stories that are familiar to many people are read by students. Then students write an essay When you read these stories from the Bible… What did the writer cause you to think about in your personal life? The stories in the Bible are part of our society’s culture. Enrique Gonzalez. Principal, Highland Park High School He talks about “a personal history book http://tinyurl.com/personalhistorybook
  7. 7. TransformTeaching.org12 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 1: The magic in my name F is for Fierce R is for Reasonable A is for Active N is for Nice C is for Considerate I is for Intelligent S is for Sympathetic to animals For more points, explain why you chose these words. b) What’s in my family’s name? Look up your first name in “baby name” websites, especially to find out the origins. http://www.ancestry.com/learn/facts Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 13 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 2: Create a map of my ancestors Where did my extended family come from? Where did they live and where do they live now? Put your family’s travels on this map. Create a map for each parent, each grandparent and then estimate where your ancestors might have traveled from. Mom Comments
  8. 8. TransformTeaching.org14 Worksheet 2: Create a map of my ancestors Person: __________________ Comments Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 15 Worksheet 2: Create a map of my ancestors Person: _______________ Comments Where did your relative travel?
  9. 9. TransformTeaching.org16 Worksheet 2: Create a map of my ancestors Person: _________________ Comments: Where did your relative travel? Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 17 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 3: Family Tree Family tree: Start with a different page for each grandparent. The tree shows my parents, their brothers and sisters (my uncles and aunts), my grandparents. For ambitious students: Show the brothers and sisters of my grandparents so I can see who my cousins and other relatives are. For each person, put a sentence about their profession and where they live, when they were born, etc. http://www.vertex42.com/Files/pdfs/2/family-tree-chart_portrait.pdf Put your name on the left, your parents go in the middle and your grandparents are on the right column
  10. 10. TransformTeaching.org18 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 4: Autobiography Where I was born Where I came from Important events in my life Where I went to school A list of some of my friends and why I like them Use the questions from StoryCorps to “interview yourself.” Choose questions to answer. The structure of the worksheet can be EITHER a timeline (birth, childhood, primary school, middle school, high school…) http://writingyourlife.org/blog/2012/10/01/start-with-a-timeline/ OR A series of answers to the many questions that you have selected Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 19 Personal/Historical Timeline Assignment Create a timeline in which you find historical and personal events that have taken place in America. Starting off with your birth, map out ten meaningful events of your life. Then on the opposite side of the timeline, list out ten important historical events that have occurred from your birth – current day (that relate to US History). Then, next to each item on the timeline add a visual that represents the event. This can be a drawing, a photo, or a printed picture. The descriptions of each event should be written or typed on the back side of the timeline. They need to be put in the same order as they fall on the timeline. *Remember this is a timeline so you should start with your birth and end with present day. Areas to focus on that can be considered your socially historical events: o Political Events o World Events (United States needs to be involved) o Social Events o Technological Developments o Local Events o The events should be spread out across the timeline. At least 3 events should be from the 1990s. § Each historical fact should include the following details: o What was the event? o What happened at the event? o When did it happen? o Who was involved? (Countries, people) o Where did it happen? o What was the effect/impact it had on America? Your personal events……. Anything that is considered monumental to you should be listed. § Each personal fact should include the following details: o What was the event? o What happened at the event? o When did it happen? o Who was involved? o Where did it happen? o What was the effect/impact it had on your life? Source: http://www.lancerlibrary.org/personalhistorical-timeline.html
  11. 11. TransformTeaching.org20 AUTOBIOGRAPHY by answering questions (choose some of these questions and write, and write, and write… or talk to a camera and record your answers) Questions from StoryCorps http://storycorps.org/great-questions/ GREAT QUESTIONS FOR ANYONE • Who has been the most important person in your life? Can you tell me about him or her? • What was the happiest moment of your life? The saddest? • Who has been the biggest influence on your life? What lessons did that person teach you? • Who has been the kindest to you in your life? • What are the most important lessons you’ve learned in life? • What is your earliest memory? • What is your favorite memory of me? • Are there any funny stories your family tells about you that come to mind? • Are there any funny stories or memories or characters from your life that you want to tell me about? • What are you proudest of? • When in life have you felt most alone? • If you could hold on to one memory from your life forever, what would that be? • How has your life been different than what you’d imagined? • How would you like to be remembered? • Do you have any regrets? • What does your future hold? • What are your hopes for what the future holds for me? For my children? • If this was to be our very last conversation, is there anything you’d want to say to me • For your great great grandchildren listening to this years from now: is there any wisdom you’d want to pass on to them? What would you want them to know? • Is there anything that you’ve never told me but want to tell me now? • Is there something about me that you’ve always wanted to know but have never asked? Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 21 FRIENDS OR COLLEAGUES • If you could interview anyone from your life living or dead, but not a celebrity, who would it be and why? • What is your first memory of me? • Was there a time when you didn’t like me? • What makes us such good friends? • How would you describe me? How would you describe yourself? • Where will we be in 10 years? 20 years? • Do you think we’ll ever lose touch with each other? • Is there anything that you’ve always wanted to tell me but haven’t? GRANDPARENTS • Where did you grow up? • What was your childhood like? • Who were your favorite relatives? • Do you remember any of the stories they used to tell you? • How did you and grandma/grandpa meet? • What was my mom/dad like growing up? • Do you remember any songs that you used to sing to her/him? Can you sing them now? • Was she/he well-behaved? • What is the worst thing she/he ever did? • What were your parents like? • What were your grandparents like? • How would you like to be remembered? • Are you proud of me? RAISING CHILDREN • When did you first find out that you’d be a parent? How did you feel? • Can you describe the moment when you saw your child for the first time? • How has being a parent changed you? • What are your dreams for your children? • Do you remember when your last child left home for good?
  12. 12. TransformTeaching.org22 • Do you have any favorite stories about your kids? PARENTS • Do you remember what was going through your head when you first saw me? • How did you choose my name? • What was I like as a baby? As a young child? • Do you remember any of the songs you used to sing to me? Can you sing them now? • What were my siblings like? • What were the hardest moments you had when I was growing up? • If you could do everything again, would you raise me differently? • What advice would you give me about raising my own kids? • What are your dreams for me? • How did you meet mom/dad? • Are you proud of me? GROWING UP • When and where were you born? • Where did you grow up? • What was it like? • Who were your parents? • What were your parents like? • How was your relationship with your parents? • Did you get into trouble? What was the worst thing you did? • Do you have any siblings? What were they like growing up? • What did you look like? • How would you describe yourself as a child? Were you happy? • What is your best memory of childhood? Worst? • Did you have a nickname? How’d you get it? • Who were your best friends? What were they like? • How would you describe a perfect day when you were young? • What did you think your life would be like when you were older? Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 23 • Do you have any favorite stories from your childhood? SCHOOL • Did you enjoy school? • What kind of student were you? • What would you do for fun? • How would your classmates remember you? • Are you still friends with anyone from that time in your life? • What are your best memories of grade school/high school/college/graduate school? Worst memories? • Was there a teacher or teachers who had a particularly strong influence on your life? Tell me about them. • Do you have any favorite stories from school? LOVE & RELATIONSHIPS • Do you have a love of your life? • When did you first fall in love? • Can you tell me about your first kiss? • What was your first serious relationship? • Do you believe in love at first sight? • Do you ever think about previous lovers? • What lessons have you learned from your relationships? MARRIAGE & PARTNERSHIPS • How did you meet your husband/wife? • How did you know he/she was “the one”? • How did you propose? • What were the best times? The most difficult times? • Did you ever think of getting divorced? • Did you ever get divorced? Can you tell me about it? • What advice do you have for young couples? • Do you have any favorite stories from your marriage or about your husband/wife?
  13. 13. TransformTeaching.org24 WORKING • What do you do for a living? • Tell me about how you got into your line of work. • Do you like your job? • What did you think you were going to be when you grew up? • What did you want to be when you grew up? • What lessons has your work life taught you? • If you could do anything now, what would you do? Why? • Do you plan on retiring? If so, when? How do you feel about it? • Do you have any favorite stories from your work life? RELIGION • Can you tell me about your religious beliefs/spiritual beliefs? What is your religion? • Have you experienced any miracles? • What was the most profound spiritual moment of your life? • Do you believe in God? • Do you believe in the after-life? What do you think it will be like? • When you meet God, what do you want to say to Him? SERIOUS ILLNESS • Can you tell me about your illness? • Do you think about dying? Are you scared? • How do you imagine your death? • Do you believe in an after-life? • Do you regret anything? • Do you look at your life differently now than before you were diagnosed? • Do you have any last wishes? • If you were to give advice to me or my children, or even children to come in our family, what would it be? • What have you learned from life? The most important things? • Has this illness changed you? What have you learned? • How do you want to be remembered? Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 25 FAMILY HERITAGE • What is your ethnic background? • Where is your mom’s family from? Where is your dad’s family from? • Have you ever been there? What was that experience like? • What traditions have been passed down in your family? • Who were your favorite relatives? • Do you remember any of the stories they used to tell you? • What are the classic family stories? Jokes? Songs? WAR • Were you in the military? • Did you go to war? What was it like? • How did war change you? • During your service, can you recall times when you were afraid? • What are your strongest memories from your time in the military? • What lessons did you learn from this time in your life? REMEMBERING A LOVED ONE • What was your relationship to _____? • Tell me about _____. • What is your first memory of _____? • What is your best memory of _____? • What is your most vivid memory of _____? • What did _____ mean to you? • Are you comfortable/ can you talk about _____’s death? How did _____ die? • What has been the hardest thing about losing _____? • What would you ask _____ if _____ were here today? • What do you miss most about _____? • How do you think _____ would want to be remembered? • Can you talk about the biggest obstacles _____ overcame in life? • Was there anything you and _____ disagreed about, fought over, or experienced some conflict around?
  14. 14. TransformTeaching.org26 • What about _____ makes you smile? • What was your relationship like? • What did _____ look like? • Did you have any favorite jokes _____ used to tell? • Do you have any stories you want to share about _____? • What were _____’s hopes and dreams for the future? • Is there something about _____ that you think no one else knows? • How are you different now than you were before you lost _____? • What is the image of _____ that persists? • Do you have any traditions to honor _____? • What has helped you the most in your grief? • What are the hardest times? SOURCE: http://storycorps.org/great-questions/ These questions come from StoryCorps.org. Why not take a moment and click LIKE on their Facebook page? Go ahead. Make an impact. Leave your impact on the Internet. YourNetImpact.com Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 27 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 5: Picture Pages Write at least two sentences about each photo (When, where, and why the photo was taken, and how I was feeling at the time) Three photos about my past Three photos about my present Three photos about Tomorrow What I hope to be in the future If the photos show your relatives, ask them “what was going on at the time?” If you don’t have photos about yourself, find photos of a similar event. For example, if you attended an important event that appeared in the newspaper, you can put a screen shot of the video or if you shook hands with the governor, you can write about what that was like. If you want to add more photos, it’s okay If you want to put a photo of a friend, that’s okay,. Remember to talk deeply about how you felt at that moment.
  15. 15. TransformTeaching.org28 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 6: Inspirational person The most inspirational person in my life Write about the person. What inspires you about the person? What does the person do? What are some of the quotes or proverbs that the person told you (or that you read about)? What advice did the person give you? Tell a story that shows how important that person is in making you who you are. The person can be dead. One of my students chose Dante Alighieri, the poet and author. “Dante inspired me to become a writer,” my student told me. “I love the way he writes and uses language to affect me when I am reading his stories.” Then the student gave examples from some of the books that Dante wrote. You might have never met this person. One of my students chose Richard Dawkins and Neil Degrasse Tyson as his inspirational people. He quoted from their books. Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 29 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 7: Personal Firsts The first time I crossed a busy street The first time I used a telephone The first time I tried a new type of food The first time I lost someone close to me The first time I failed a test (and what I learned about myself) The first time I won a race The first time I lost a race The first time I was hurt The first time I held a baby The first time I rescued an animal If you don’t remember the first time, then change the question: You can write about a time… (without giving a year). I'm going to write about a time when I rescued an animal. What “first” did I do? Here’s why it was important to me Year
  16. 16. TransformTeaching.org30 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 8: I want to do these things Twenty-five things that I want to do in my life (a bucket list) “Before I kick the bucket…” What do you want to do in the next 20 or 50 or 70 years? I want to… Why: Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 31 Personal History Workbook: The Bucket List (continued) I want to… Why:
  17. 17. TransformTeaching.org32 A personal history book This project can take a good student about four weeks to complete…. Worksheet 9: Interview a relative, write the stories, publish a book called “Stories that my _____ told me.” Now you are an author. PUBLISH Yes, you can be a “published author.” You can find your name on Amazon.com. You can type in your name in the search space and find a book next to your name. For example, “steve mccrea” gives the following result. Imagine what you could produce. Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 33 POINTS SHEET Every project has a list of standards (called a RUBRIC) showing “what’s a good project” and “this project isn’t finished yet.” Worksheet Number of points This project is not ready yet This project is ready Points earned The magic of my name (5) Made a list Each word is explained with a short story A map of ancestors (10) Some dots on a map Several arrows showing trips with explanations on an attached page. Family tree (5 points/ branch) Incomplete dates without reasons Any blanks are explained Autobiography (30) I was born in Atlanta, I went to school in Timeline: at least 30 entries Questions: at least 30 answers with at least two sentences per answer Picture pages (10) I was three years old in this photo. at least two sentences per photo, explain where and what you might have been thinking at the time Inspirational person (14) A page of notes and a photo Examples of the person’s advice, favorite quotes and WHY the person inspires you Personal Firsts A list without reasons Each “first” includes at least two sentences explaining WHY the event is important. I want to do these things (2) A list without reasons Each goal includes at least two sentences explaining WHY the goal is important. Interview a relative (24) Three pages of notes A video, a transcript of the video and answers (100 words per answer) to at least 20 questions Total 100 points Points earned >>>>>>>>>
  18. 18. TransformTeaching.org34 Example Personal  History  Project     Frantz  Saintil                   Autobiography     A  brave  new  world     My  Family  Tree     Inspiring  People:    Dante     Delusion     The  importance  of  mistakes                     Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 35     Autobiography   My  name  is  Frantz  Saintil.  As  far  as  I  know,  and  I  far  as  I  was  told,  I  was   born  in  Port-­‐au-­‐Prince,  Haiti.  I  spent  part  of  my  childhood  in  a  small  city   called  cite  militaire.  From  what  I  remember  about  that  place,  it  was   small...  Too  small,  for  me  at  least.  Even  as  a  child,  I  was  extremely   adventurous  and  rebellious,  a  trait  I  carried  with  me  into  adulthood.  I   hated  staying  home,  and  would  leave  for  hours.  It  was  a  small  town   where  everyone  knew  each  other;  I  wasn't  in  any  real  danger  when  I  left   home.  What  did  I  do  when  I  left  home?  Well,  anything  and  everything.  I   was  a  boy  then.  Everything  was  a  toy,  a  game,  an  adventure.  During   simple  days,  some  of  my  friends  and  I  would  play  basketball  and/or   soccer.  But  during  more  exciting  days,  we  would  ride  our  bikes  far   behind  the  town's  lines  and  into  the  next  town.  We  weren't  supposed  to,   due  to  the  danger  that  lurked  beyond  the  town:  Gangs,  thieves,   kidnappers,  and  psychos.  We  didn't  care.  We  couldn't  care.  Our  sense  of   adventure  wouldn't  allow  us  to  care.  We  wouldn't  stay  for  long,  but  still   we  would  spot  "strange"  people  doing  unusual  things.   My  beloved  town  was  dirty.  It  was  home,  but  I  have  to  be  honest.  There   was  a  huge  and  deep  hole  in  the  ground  near  my  house.  They  filled  it  up   with  trash  and  garbage,  but  the  hole  was  so  deep  I  thought  it  was  the   gates  to  hell.  It  stunk  too,  badly.  Stray  animals  would  sometimes  fall  in.   Some  we  got  out,  but  unfortunately,  you  can't  save  everyone.  Eventually,   the  town's  people  cleaned  the  hole  and  filled  it  with  cement.  It  was  a   spectacle:  The  street  was  crowded  with  people,  the  air  filled  with  voices   and  laughter,  younger  children  would  run  and  play  with  their  toys  and   pets,  while  the  adults  worked  and  talked.  I  was  there  too,  but  I  didn't   take  part  in  the  work.  It  wasn't  interesting  enough.  However,  I  was   curious  as  to  whether  I  was  right  to  assume  that  the  hole  was  the  gate  to   hell.  It  was  not.  
  19. 19. TransformTeaching.org36 I  suppose  this  should  contain  only  the  most  memorable  and  defining   moments  in  my  life.  The  first  of  that  kind  is  the  day  I  found  my  first  pet...   Or  she  found  me.  It  was  a  long,  hot  day  for  me,  and  father  had  made  sure   to  keep  it  busy  by  further  teaching  me  how  to  properly  multiply  and   divide.  I  hated  those  days.  If  I  solved  a  problem  incorrectly,  I  was  to   stand  in  a  corner,  think  of  where  I  went  wrong,  and  try  again  until  I   fixed  the  problem.  And  that  was  the  easy  punishment.  After  I  proudly   and  correctly  solving  a  number  of  problems,  my  father  allowed  me  a  20-­‐ minute  break.  That's  when  I  met  her.  She  was  so  small  and  ugly,  skinny   and  sickly,  being  dragged  across  the  dusty  floor  of  the  road  by  a  poor   excuse  for  a  leash.  She  was  crying  out,  and  in  a  way,  it  could  have  been   for  me.    Up  to  that  moment,  my  parents  didn't  allow  me  to  have  a  dog.  I   asked  numerous  times  before,  but  for  reasons  beyond  my   understanding,  they  wouldn't  allow  it.  But  even  they  couldn't  resist  her.   My  father  asked  the  man  why  he  was  dragging  the  puppy,  and  the  man   said  to  throw  it  away.  We  asked  if  we  could  have  the  pup  and  he  simply   handed  over  the  leash  and  left.  She  was  unpleasant  to  the  eyes  and  the   nose,  but  I  couldn't  help  but  to  fall  in  love  with  her.  In  a  few  short   months,  she  was  transformed  into  the  most  beautiful  dog  in  the  entire   town,  and  a  few  months  later,  she  was  pregnant,  and  gave  birth  to  three   pups.  Sadly,  I  left  the  country  a  week  after  the  pups  were  born.  Years   after  that,  she  died  in  the  volcano.  Her  pups,  MY  pups,  were  stolen  and   sold.  I  understand  people  were  desperate  and  needy  after  the   earthquake,  but  it's  a  matter  of  principle:  You  do  not  take  that  which   does  not  belong  to  you.  But  being  who  I  am,  I  strongly  believe  that  we   must  do  and  take  what  we  need  to  survive  and  even  thrive.  So,  I  forgave   and  I  forgot.       Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 37 A  brave  new  world   Despite  the  complications  I've  endured,  the  first  scary  moment  I  ever   faced  was  leaving  my  home  for  another  country.  I  was  young.  I  had   friends.  My  life  was  simple,  until  that  day  came.  A  week  before  my   departure,  my  dog  gave  birth  to  three  puppies.  I  was  looking  forward  to   watching  them  grow  into  full  dogs,  and  helping  them  along  the  way.  I   never  had  that  privilege.  I  suppose  in  a  sense  I  needed  to  set  aside  the   least  important  things  in  my  life  and  embrace  the  most  important  things   in  order  to  grow.  It  was  so  long  ago,  I  forgot  when  I  left,  but  I  remember   it  was  in  December,  around  Christmas.  I  remember  because  that  was  the   first  time  I  got  drunk.  As  I  write  this,  I  am  still  not  old  enough  to  drink.   I  remember  approaching  the  plane.  It  was  huge,  and  had  a  roar  of  a   hundred  lions.  My  sister  was  afraid,  but  the  flight  attendant  comforted   her.  We  landed  a  few  hours  after.  Security  was  a  pain.  The  first,  new,   family  member  I  met  was  my  grandfather.  A  great  big  man  with  a  big   belly.  He  reminded  me  of  Santa  Clause,  if  Santa  was  black.  He  had  a  limp,   caused  by  a  fractured  knee,  yet  he  still  found  the  strength  to  walk  and   hug  my  parents,  then  my  sister  and  me.   The  second  person  I  met  was  my  uncle,  my  father's  younger  brother,   and  the  youngest  of  six  children.  He  was  a  bit  more  subtle,  but  there  was   no  mistaking  it,  he  was  happy  to  see  his  brother.  On  the  ride  to  my   grandparents’  house,  I  quickly  noticed  an  obvious  fact:  I  was  in  a  whole   new  world.  I  loved  my  old  home,  but  the  United  States  filled  me  with   awe.      It  was  stunningly  beautiful.  But  when  compared  to  Haiti,  I  guess  I   shouldn't  have  been  so  surprised.     My  favorite  and  least  favorite  family  member  was  my  father's  uncle.  He   was  an  old,  blind  man,  but  spoke  as  if  he  were  25.  He  spoke  too  much,   and  sometimes,  way  too  much.  He  was  that  uncle  that  everyone  has  and   loves  to  hate  because  he  could  be  such  a  pain.  The  best  way  to   summarize  him  is  with  one  name:  Kramer  (from  the  TV  show  Seinfeld).  I   loved  watching  him  give  everyone  a  hard  time.  Even  with  his  blindness
  20. 20. TransformTeaching.org38 and  old  age,  he  was  annoying  and  playful.  I  met  other  family  members   as  well.  Each  of  them  special  and  interesting  in  their  own  ways.  It's  a   pity  we  aren't  close  anymore.   I  know  I  make  moving  to  the  U.S.  sound  like  the  best  thing  in  the  world,   and  it  is,  but  Haiti  was  pretty  great,  too.  I  had  friends  there,  and  family.  I   had  a  dog  and  three  puppies.  In  Haiti,  I  had  a  level  of  freedom  that  I  lack   In  the  U.S.   Truth  be  told,  before  I  moved,  Haiti  was  falling  apart.  I  remember  the   flying  bullets  and  the  stink  of  gunpowder.  A  gang  war  waged  near  my   town.  Whether  it  was  against  the  police,  the  government,  or  other  gangs,   I  did  not  know,  but  people  were  being  killed,  kidnapped,  or  even  worst.   Yes,  there  are  things  worse  than  death.  I  used  to  see  them-­‐the  bullets.  At   night,  if  you  stared  at  the  horizon,  you  could  see  red  shooting  stars   flying  across  your  eyes.  Those  were  bullets.  Fortunately,  the  war  never   made  its  way  into  my  town,  but  it  did  circle  its  borders.  One  night,  I   heard  on  the  news  that  a  child  was  seen  walking  the  streets,  holding  a   red  bag.  When  the  child  got  home,  he  gave  the  bag  to  his  mother.  The   mother  opened  the  bag  and  found  the  severed  head  of  her  other  son.   They  sent  a  child  to  deliver  his  own  brother's  head  to  his  mother,  all   because  she  couldn't  pay  the  ransom.  The  people  were  mostly  poor.  So,   if  you  were  kidnapped,  expect  to  die,  because  your  family  wouldn't  have   enough  to  money  to  save  your  life.  They  couldn't  call  the  police  either.   The  police  force  in  Haiti  is  a  joke.   My  father  was  almost  kidnapped  one  night.  Though  we  have  our   differences,  my  father  is  a  great  father.  In  the  middle  of  the  night,  in  the   middle  of  a  gang  war,  he  decided  to  go  out  and  buy  us  food  for  the  night   and  the  next  morning.  He  knew  the  risks,  but  he  had  a  responsibility  to   his  family.  And  a  real  man  always  takes  care  of  his  responsibility.   Fortunately,  the  kidnappers’  attempt  woke  the  neighbors,  and  they   abandoned  their  attack.     I  miss  my  friends  and  my  home,  but  I  have  a  new  home  now,  in  a  brave   new  world.   Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 39   My  family  tree   For  a  part  of  my  childhood,  my  mother's  side  of  the  family  was  the  only   side  I  knew.  Before  we  moved  to  the  United  States,  my  mother,  father,   sister  and  I  lived  some  20  steps  away  from  my  grandfather's  house  (my   mother's  father).  As  far  I  knew,  my  grandfather  was  just  an  old  man  who   enjoyed  sitting  on  his  rocking  chair  as  he  read  newspapers  and  drink   whatever  he  had  in  that  cup  of  his.  He  was  pretty  boring  and  quiet,   unless  it  was  Sunday.  My  grandfather  not  only  owned  and  operated  a   small  church,  he  was  a  contributing  member  of  a  bigger  church   somewhere  downtown.  On  Sundays,  he  completely  transformed  into  a   new  man:  flashy  suits,  watch,  shoes...  You'd  think  he  was  meeting  the   queen.   But  later  on  I  discovered  that  there  was  more  to  my  grandfather  than  a   boring  old  man  who  loved  God.  My  grandfather,  like  most  people,  was   heavily  flawed.  When  my  mother  and  her  brother  were  in  their  20s,  my   boring,  gentle,  God-­‐fearing  grandfather  kicked  them  out.  I  believe  he   believed  he  had  his  reasons,  but  not  every  reason  is  just.  Kicking  my   mother  and  uncle  out,  along  with  many  of  my  grandfather's  other   indiscretions,  ignited  a  fire  of  petty  differences  and  conflict  in  our   already  small  family,  a  fire  that  burns  still  today,  though  dim  and  dying   as  it  is.  At  the  time,  my  mother  had  very  little  she  could  call  hers,  but   with  the  help  of  my  father  and  my  uncle,  she  survived,  and  if  I  may  say   so  myself,  thrived.  Unfortunately,  my  mother's  struggles  were  just   beginning.   My  parents  met  when  they  were  both  in  their  early  twenties.  My  father   was  born  outside  of  the  capital,  far  outside  of  the  city,  in  a  place  called   Port-­‐de-­‐Paix:  A  commune  and  the  capital  of  the  department  of  Norouest   in  Haiti  on  the  Atlantic  coast.  My  mother  was  born  on  the  opposite  end   of  the  country  in  Port-­‐au-­‐Prince,  the  capital  and  largest  city  of  Haiti.  My   father  left  Port-­‐de-­‐Paix  after  he  graduated  high  school.  At  the  time,  he   was  about  17  or  18.  My  parents  met  when  they  were  both  around  22  or   23,  and  were  married  five  years  after.  I  was  born  three  years  after  that,   but  not  without  complications.  My  mother,  unfortunately,  is  diabetic,        
  21. 21. TransformTeaching.org40 and  she's  been  a  diabetic  since  before  I  was  born,  which  made  her   dreams  of  motherhood  a  nightmare.  I'm  the  first  child  of  my  mother,  but   I  wasn't  her  first  pregnancy.  Whether  her  diabetes  played  a  hand  in  this   or  not  is  uncertain,  but  my  mother  miscarried  twice  before  I  was  born.   Right  before  I  was  conceived,  diabetes  aimed  to  claim  my  mother's  life.   While  she  was  bedbound  and  petrified  by  her  illness,  a  man,  whom  she   could  not  identify,  came  to  my  mother  and  told  her  to  look  in  the  mirror,   she  looked  and  saw  an  old,  grey-­‐haired  version  of  herself.  She  was  upset   and  asked  the  man  why  he  did  this  to  her.    The  man  smiled  and  replied,   "You  are  going  to  live  a  very  long  life,"  then  disappeared...  Or  so  she   claimed.  Superstitious  nonsense  of  course,  but  I'm  happy  to  say  that  it's   been  twenty  years  since  then,  and  my  mother  is  still  alive,  healthy,   working,  and  has  had  the  strength  to  give  life  to  two  children.   I  remember  when  my  uncle  left  for  the  United  States.  It  upset  me.  I  loved   my  uncle,  much  more  than  I  loved  any  of  my  other  uncles,  but  that's   simply  because  I  never  knew  them.  My  mother  told  me  that  after  I  was   born,  my  uncle  would  take  me  and  spend  an  entire  day  with  me.  He   would  ignore  his  friends  for  days  just  to  be  with  me.  I've  always  held   that  over  my  sister,  since  he  never  bonded  with  her  as  he  did  with  me.  I   used  to  tell  her  the  reason  why  uncle  doesn't  like  her  is  because  she  was   adopted,  and  her  real  parents  were  murderers.  Of  course  she  believed   me.  Evil,  yes,  but  fun  all  the  same.  I  haven't  spoken  to  my  uncle  since  he   left,  not  because  I  can't  or  I  don't  want  to,  but  because,  well,  I  have   nothing  to  say  to  him,  and  I  imagine  he  has  nothing  to  say  to  me.   According  to  my  mother,  my  uncle  and  I  share  similar  personalities:  we   both  hate  crowds,  we  keep  to  ourselves,  we're  shy,  but  will  be   outspoken  when  we  need  to  be,  and  we're  both  quiet.  Though  my   uncle's  traits  rubbed  off  on  me,  we  do  have  identifiable  differences.  For   example,  I  became  somewhat  of  an  anarchist,  but  my  uncle  was  once  a   police  officer.   I  cherished  my  relationship  with  my  uncle,  and  I  still  do,  but  that's   mainly  because  my  father  and  I  never  had  (and  still  don't  have)  much  of   a  relationship.  Aside  from  our  last  names  and  the  fact  that  we're  both   males,  the  man  and  I  have  absolutely  nothing  in  common.  My  father   was,  in  his  perspective,  smart,  responsible,  reliable,  dependable...  An   example  of  what  everyone  should  be,  yet  I  stand  the  opposite.  I  never   could  meet  my  father's  standards,  and  it  used  to  bother  me.  For  most  of   my  childhood,  until  I  turned  13  and  stopped  caring,  my  entire  existence   Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 41 was  entirely  devoted  to  making  my  father  proud.  I  never  could.  He  used   to  say,  "How  did  I  end  up  with  a  son  like  you?  When  I  was  your  age  I   was..."    Our  relationship  only  worsened  with  time.  Now  we  barely  speak.   But  don't  get  me  wrong:    he  was  and  still  is  a  good  father.  He  made  sure   that  his  family  had  everything  they  needed:  a  house,  mode  of   transportation,  food,  and  clothes.  Some  of  my  friends  don't  know  their   father,  and  though  they  have  my  sympathy,  I'm  grateful  for  knowing   mine.  My  father  took  me  to  school  and  made  sure  I  learned.  He  taught   me  math  and  helped  with  my  science  homework.  He  fed  me  far  before  I   got  hungry,  and  made  sure  I  looked  my  best  when  I  left  the  house.  He  is   a  good  father,  but,  in  my  opinion,  a  questionable  dad.  My  father  may  not   like  me;  I  may  not  be  the  son  he  wanted,  but  he  stuck  around  to  watch   and  help  me  grow,  and  for  that,  he  deserves  my  thanks.   My  mother  on  the  other  hand  loves  me.  I'm  her  first  born.  Though  she   may  not  agree  with  my  life  choices,  she  absolutely  adores  me.  Although   she  can  be  manipulative,  passive-­‐aggressive,  and  intolerably  annoying,  I   love  her  too.  I  should  act  like  it  more.  It's  been  years  since  I  hugged  and   thanked  her  simply  for  being  the  best  mother  a  child  could  ask  for.                                                                                                  
  22. 22. TransformTeaching.org42 Inspiring  people  in  my  life  1:   Dante  Alighieri   Before  I  took  it  upon  myself  to  engage  the  challenges  of  being  a  writer,  I   dreamt  of  being  many  things.  I  dreamt  of  being  a  racecar  driver,  a   zoologist,  and  a  game  designer.  But  in  time,  the  child  in  me  had  his  fill  of   hopes  and  childish  dreams.  The  man  in  me  found  his  true  calling  after  I   watched  the  animated  movie  Dante's  Inferno,  an  Animated  Epic.  Ironic,  I   know.  I  grew  obsessed  with  the  movie.  If  you  can  believe  it,  it  spoke  to   me  and  showed  me  a  beautiful  truth  about  the  power  of  a  god.  Being  a   writer  means  having  the  power  to  make  possible  the  impossible.  It's  the   power  to  create  worlds,  galaxies,  even  universes.    Life  and  death  itself  at   the  tip  of  a  pen,  my  pen.  It  gave  me  freedom  for  loneliness  and  the   mundane.     Dante  bested  all  manners  of  demons  and  vile  creatures  in  all  the  nine   circles  of  hell,  and  conquered  Lucifer  himself,   all  to  save  his  beloved.  It  was  a  task  impossible   in  this  world,  but  not  so  in  the  realm  of   literature,  in  my  world.   It  may  seem  egotistical,  but  on  the  face  of  pages   and  paper,  I  forged  a  world  that  centers  on  me.   A  world  in  which  I  am  king,  God,  and  devil.  A   world  in  which  I  am  both  hero  and  villain  -­‐-­‐  an   escape  from  reality.  An  honest  world.  A  good   world.  A  delusional  world.  A  home  at  last.   Dante  Alighieri,  the  poet  who  wrote  the  Divine  Comedy,  and  my  favorite   writer,  paved  the  way  to  my  greatest  and  most  daunting  challenge:  To   become  a  writer.       Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 43   Inspirational  people  2:  Richard  Dawkins,  Sam   Harris,  Bill  Nye  (the  science  guy),  Plato,   Lawrence  Krauss,  Neil  Degrasse  Tyson     Doctors  Richard  Dawkins,  Sam  Harris,  Bill  Nye,  Lawrence  Krauss,  and   Neil  Degrasse  Tyson  rescued  me  from  a  world  of  immorality.    I  used  to   live  in  a  void  threatened  by  the  unintelligent,  the   unreasonable,  and  the  illogical.  These  heroes  gave  me   the  best  advice  a  human  can  give  to  another:  Think   critically,  scientifically,  and  question  everything.   This  is  advice  that  my  children  will  inherit  (if  I  have   children),  and  hopefully,  so,  too,  will  their  children.     Bill  Nye  (above),    Laurence  Krauss      (below)   Since  my  "revelation,"  I've  risen  above  childish   thoughts,  ambitions,  and  beliefs.  The  fogged  cleared  and   revealed  a  brand  new  world  for  my  eyes  to  see.  Beyond   the  world  my  parents  hid  me  in  was  a  bigger  world,  one   with  wonderful  things  to  know  and  learn.  A  scientific   world.  Quickly,  I  took  a  liking  to  astrophysics  and   biology.  The  little  I've  learned  since  then  was  enough  to   re-­‐shape  my  entire  perspective  on  life,  each  other,  and  the  world  we  call   home.  I  took  an  interest  in  evolution,  and  decided  to  learn  as  much  as  I   could  before  moving  on  to  other  projects.  To  avoid  committing  an  act  of   hypocrisy,  I  didn't  simply  study  evolution.  I  researched  as  much  as  I   could  of  what  I  studied,  and  even  conducted  my  own  experiments  in   order  to  measure  the  authenticity  of  my  research.  After  learning  of  the   evolution  of  flight,  I  built  a  model  of  a  bird  and  attempted  to  replicate   the  attributes  that  allow  birds  to  fly:  The  shape  of  the  wings,  the  unique   lungs,  the  muscles  on  the  wings  and  legs,  the  hollowed  bones.  My  bird  
  23. 23. TransformTeaching.org44 glided  across  the  backyard,  but  without  the  power  of  real  muscles,  it   could  fly  no  further.   For  a  time,  I  tried  to  open  the  gates  of  this  world  to  my  friends  and   family,  but  unfortunately,  unlike  a  snake,  not  everyone  possesses  the   ability  to  shed  their  old  skin  for  a  new,  more  beautiful  one.  They  lack  the   ability  to  simply  do  as  much  as  consider  it.  A  sad  fact,  but  a   fact  nonetheless.  The  things  I  learned  from  my  heroes  are  the   core,  the  foundation  of  the  man  I  am  today  and  the  man  I  am   bound  to  become  tomorrow.  And  though  many  would  find   faults  in  my  growth,  I  stand  ever  so  proud  of  it.   Neil  Degrasse  Tyson         Plato       Sam  Harris       Richard  Dawkins             Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 45 Delusion   In  a  stroke  of  irony,  one  of  my  greatest  heroes,  for  a  time  now,  has  been   delusion.   It's  a  strange  thing  to  cling  to  a  delusion,  but  for  some,  it's  not  a  choice   easily  made.  My  childhood,  my  upbringing,  and  the  current  status  of  my   life  today  all  scream  out  for  help.  With  minimal  effect,  I  can  trace  all  my   "problems"  back  to  my  relationship  with  others,  or  the  lack  thereof.  My   father  and  I  shared  a  rather  strange  relationship,  one  that  only   worsened  with  the  aid  of  time.  It  all  arose  from  my  inability  to  become   the  son  he  wanted.  I  can't  remember  the  last  time  my  father  and  I   exchanged  kind  words.  As  a  child,  I  was  committed  to  devote  the  best   years  of  my  life  to  making  my  father  proud,  a  task  I  later  found   impossible.  Still  today,  I  am  convinced  the  man  hates  me.  My  lack  of   relationship  with  my  father  is  just  the  beginning  to  the  answer  of  why  I   prefer  delusion  to  reality.   Like  the  rest  of  humanity,  I  too  have  had  my  share  of  heartbreaks  and   heartbreaking,  but  I  feel  I  have  reached  my  breaking  point.  Our  trusted   guides  -­‐-­‐  authority  figures  in  our  lives,  parents,  teachers,  uncles,  and   grandparents  -­‐-­‐  all  told  us  of  the  wonders  of  falling  in  love,  the  epic   quest  of  finding  your  "soul  mate,"  and  through  it,  the  pursuit  of  ultimate   happiness.  But  what  they  failed  to  mention  was  how  much  of  ourselves   we  lose  in  the  process.  It  is  a  great  and  wonderful  thing  to  fall  in  love,   don't  misunderstand  me,  but  in  my  opinion,  it's  not  nearly  worth  the   trouble.  I've  been  permanently  scarred  by  love,  a  scar  I  fear  not  even   time  has  the  power  to  ease.  It  is  sad  and  pathetic  to  miss  someone  so   much  that  you  stay  awake  night  after  night  teary  eyed,  and  to  know  that   they  don't  care  and  are  happy  with  another:  your  replacement.  The   thought  is  enough  to  drive  a  man  insane,  especially  when  said  man  has   no  one  to  share  those  thoughts  with,  and  no  one  to  teach  him  that  pain,   heartbreak,  tears,  and  sleepless  nights  are  all  parts  of  growing  up.  And   that  pain  shapes  character.  And  scars,  well,  those  are  proud  proofs  that   you  survived  the  vicious  side  of  reality.  
  24. 24. TransformTeaching.org46 Everything  I  now  know  of  life  and  pain,  things  that  my  "beloved"  father   was  meant  to  teach  me,  I  found  out  for  myself.  Trouble  is,  I  fear  I  was   too  late.  In  my  head  I  built  a  world  where  I  know  happiness,  love,  family,   compassion,  and  all  the  things  I  find  lacking  in  my  real  life.  In  that  world,   I  am  happy,  or  I  was,  until  it  too  caved  in  and  went  up  in  flames.  My   intelligence,  though  limited  as  it  may  be,  could  not  allow  me  to  continue   living  a  false  life  in  my  own  head.  I  value  truth,  and  a  delusion  is  the   exact  opposite.   So...  Why  is  delusion  my  hero?  Because,  as  cowardly  as  it  may  seem  to   hide  in  a  false,  delusional  world,  it's  what's  kept  me  alive  for  over  five   years.  If  I  didn't  run  and  hide  to  a  place  where  I  had  a  father  who  loved   me  and  was  proud  of  me,  true  friends  who  cared  for  me,  love  in  the  gaze   of  a  woman  who  would  stand  by  me  through  hell,  and  ultimately   everything  that  I  didn't  have  in  this  world,  I  would  have  ended  my  own   life  long  ago...  The  thought  certainly  crossed  my  mind  a  few  hundred   times.  I  am  not  expecting  anyone  to  understand  why.  Try  as  I  might,  I   cannot  replicate  the  burden  of  being  fundamentally  lonely,  and  the  pain   of  being  an  utter  disappointment  in  words.  Being  delusional  for  a  short   while  saved  my  life.  But  now  that  I  shattered  my  delusion,  ironclad  and   armed  to  the  teeth,  I  think  and  hope  that  I  am  finally  ready  to  once  again   face  reality.   Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 47       Statement  by  a  Teacher           I’m  impressed  with  this  effort.      The  work  of  a   Personal  History  is  part  of  the  graduation   requirements  of  some  schools.      Frantz  has  given  an   excellent  standard  for  other  students  at  SunEd  High   to  aim  for.           Mr.  Steve   Projects  and  Global  Skills  Instructor   16  November  2014     Contact  me  with  your  questions   (954)  646  8246     SMcCrea@sunedhigh.com  
  25. 25. TransformTeaching.org48 POINTS SHEET for Frantz Frantz selected some of the projects to complete. [o] indicates a project that was omitted. Worksheet Number of points This project is not ready yet This project is ready Points earned The magic of my name (5) Made a list Each word is explained with a short story [o] A map of ancestors (10) Some dots on a map Several arrows showing trips with explanations on an attached page. [o] Family tree (5 points/ branch) Incomplete dates without reasons Any blanks are explained 5 Autobiography (30) I was born in Atlanta, I went to school in Timeline: at least 30 entries Questions: at least 30 answers with at least two sentences per answer 30 Picture pages (10) I was three years old in this photo. at least two sentences per photo, explain where and what you might have been thinking at the time [o] Inspirational person (14) A page of notes and a photo At least ten pages with specific pieces of advice. 14 Personal Firsts (4) A list without reasons Each “first” includes at least two sentences explaining WHY the event is important. [o] I want to do these things (2) A list without reasons Each goal includes at least two sentences explaining WHY the goal is important. [o] Interview a relative (20) Five questions and two pages. Use at least 20 questions from StoryCorps.org [o] Additional entries Delusion More inspirational people Brave New World (trip to USA) (51) These items replace 51 points that were omitted Comment: Full marks would include some images and some careful formatting. Extra points for taking the initiative to shape the project to his own standard 50 Total 100 points Points earned >>>>>>>>> 99 Comment by evaluator: Frantz, you shaped this project to fit you. You are not becoming a writer: with this effort, you have become a writer. Please keep writing. Start a blog. I want to subscribe to your blog. Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 49 A Project by Olivier   Sometimes  a  project  takes  a  while  to  unfold.    Olivier  plans  to  write  a  book  called  To   Be  Continued.    It  started  as  a  poem  or  a  rap  of  four  pages  and  two  weeks  later  is  had   grown  to  16  pages.         See  the  work  as  it  unfolds…       tp://tinyurl.com/oliviercontinued     For  teachers  who  are  not  familiar  with  Google  Drive  and  Google  Docs,  you  can  ask   students  to  allow  you,  the  teacher,  to  comment  or  edit.    Here  are  some  screen  shots.       This  is  how  the  Google  Doc  format  looks.          
  26. 26. TransformTeaching.org50 This  is  how  the  “share  menu”  looks:         Hear  Olivier’s  comments  about  his  book  (an  interview  in  October  2014).     Find  his  video  at  Olivier  Mathurin  SunEd  High”  on  YouTube.             That’s  the  end  of  Part  One   Personal  History  Workbook     Now  let’s  go  to  the  next  part…     Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 51 Part Two The Twelve Global Skills Step 1: Listen to a short talk on YouTube about the Skills for the future. Suggested Project: Tony Wagner takes 27 minutes to describe the 7 skills. Why not make a poster and help people learn the 7 skills more quickly? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NS2PqTTxFFc You can also go to Dr. Wagner’s website about the “Seven Survival Skills” (use those search terms). Step 2: Select a skill to work on. Most students do not get enough opportunity to develop INITIATIVE and Entrepreneuring. Step 3: Propose something. Take the INITIATIVE. Make the first move. a) Put the idea on paper. Describe your idea. Describe the materials that you might need to make your project happen.
  27. 27. TransformTeaching.org52 b) Approach a teacher with the idea: BUT DON’T TALK ABOUT IT. Take time to put your idea into writing and then let the teacher have time to read your note and think about how to respond to your initiative. What do you want to do? Go ahead. Make an impact. Leave your impact on the Internet. YourNetImpact.com     Here’s  a  look  at  the  YourNetImpact.com  page  (as  of  October   2014):       Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 53 You can learn about the 12 Global Skills http://bibpenpals.wordpress.com/2012/10/07/12-global-skills-that-your-students- can-learn-with-bib-penpals/ Project: What are the 12 Global Skills?
  28. 28. TransformTeaching.org54 The Twelve Global Skills Tony Wagner Can we take the initiative? Can we begin something? Dr. Daniel Amen AmenClinics.com Can we handle our “automatic negative thoughts”? Can we build our “resilience”? Building International Bridges (BIBPenpals.com) Cab we build a global network? Are we ready to work in the Global Economy? Do we have contacts on the five continents? Can we put thoughts in our heads by using quotations? Those are the general questions that guide this section of the workbook. This is a bonus section because most students who create a Personal History Book do not move into the topic of “resilience” or “Global Skills” – most students don’t know about the websites or videos by “Daniel Amen” or “Tony Wagner.” The challenge for students is to build a project out of these questions. Perhaps you will make a website about links to Daniel Amen’s tips about brain health and you might create a blog about your attempts to follow Amen’s advice. Your blog could report step by step about your experiences as a “more resilient” person. Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 55 You are a teenager. You know better than many adults. Businesses and organizations do NOT have “personal” pages on Google + and Facebook. Project: Take the Initiative Take the first step and make a proposal to a company. “I think your social media could be more organized. Can I make a better experience for your younger customers?” Learn how to set up a “Pages” Page on Facebook.
  29. 29. TransformTeaching.org56 Learn how to set up a “Business” on Google+ https://support.google.com/business/answer/4566606?hl=en&authuser=0&rd=1 TInyURL.com/GooglePlusBusinessPage http://tinyurl.com/googleplusbusinesspage Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 57 Project: What are the Nine ANTs? What can we do about them? Dr. Daniel Amen AmenClinics.com Can we handle our “automatic negative thoughts”? Daniel Amen has identified nine ANTs. Summary of A.N.T. Species: 1. "Always" thinking: thinking in words like always, never, no one, every one, every time, everything. 2. Focusing on the negative: only seeing the bad in a situation. 3. Fortune telling: predicting the worst possible outcome to a situation. 4. Mind reading: believing that you know what another person is thinking, even though they haven't told you. 5. Thinking with your feelings: believing negative feelings without ever questioning them. 6. Guilt beatings: thinking in words like "should, must, ought or have to." 7. Labeling: attaching a negative label to yourself or to someone else. 8. Personalization: innocuous events are taken to have personal meaning. 9. Blame: blaming someone else for your own problems http://ahha.org/articles.asp?Id=100 This article appears at www.TinyURL.com/NineAnts http://tinyurl.com/danielamen9ants Dr. Amen also has tips about “brain health.” Search for “12 Prescriptions for Healthy Brains Amen” and “10 Everyday Tips to Boost Brainpower” PROJECT: Create a poster with some of these tips that you have used successfully. http://thebestlist.menshealth.com/list/10-everyday-tips-boost-brainpower http://www.amenclinics.com/cybcyb/12-prescriptions-for-creating-a-brain- healthy-life/
  30. 30. TransformTeaching.org58 Can we build our “resilience”? Here is an article about a graph. A second article gives a list of Tips to boost brain power. The Project: Can you make a poster that explains some of these ideas? How do you plan to use these ideas in your life? 1. Work hard to boost your brain’s reserve. Brain reserve is the extra function and tissue to deal with whatever stress comes your way. When we’re born, we typically have a lot of brain reserve, especially if our parents took good care of themselves before and during pregnancy. If we aren’t very careful, life steals our reserve (stress, brain injuries, lousy diets, etc.). At some point, either due to bad habits or aging, brain reserve becomes depleted and symptoms develop (memory problems, depression, fatigue, irritability, etc.) Getting well is not just about being symptom-free, it’s about boosting brain reserve, which requires 3 simple strategies: 1. Brain envy (you have to really care about your brain) 2. Avoid anything that hurts your brain 3. Engage in regular brain healthy habits Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 59 Project: How do we build “mental toughness”? Read this article and create a poster or video to explain the ideas in the article. http://dr-daniel-g-amen.blogspot.com/2009/01/mental-toughness-develop- resilient.html Look for this shortcut: http://tinyurl.com/amenstress SOME STRESS IS GOOD (to build RESILIENCE) An interesting twist on the research occurs when children are exposed to mild, manageable forms of stress. It appears that these stresses actually aid in building resilience. Some stress, it seems, is good, even important. This is known as “stress inoculation”, based on the analogy to vaccinations against infections. The theory is that when a person is presented with a mild form of an infectious disease, he or she develops immunity by learning how to fight it off. Children who are faced with and overcome moderately stressful events, such as family moves, parental illnesses or losing friendships, are better able to deal with adversity later in life than people who were never exposed to trouble as children. Children who learn to cope with stress seem to have a better ability to deal with hardships over the long term. In one study, teenage boys who survived stressful childhood events experienced less overt signs of stress, such as increased heart rate and blood pressure changes, when performing challenging tasks compared to their counterparts who had not struggled with earlier trouble. Research on animals lend credence to the stress inoculation theory and provides insight into its brain mechanism. Young monkeys separated from their mothers for one hour every week (a manageable stressor) experienced acute distress during the separation periods, and temporarily increased levels of cortisol, the stress hormone. Later in life, however, the same monkeys demonstrate lower anxiety and lower baseline cortisol levels than monkeys who had never been separated from their mothers. Furthermore, these “stress inoculated” monkeys demonstrate improved performance on tests that measure prefrontal cortex function. Poor control of prefrontal cortex function has been associated with depression and impulsivity in humans. It seems that it is the amount of early stress that matters. Too much is clearly a problem, but too little leaves you without the skill to manage trouble later on. This research highlights an important point. Try not to protect your children from every hardship they may face. As a father of three children, I never wanted my children to suffer, yet if I did everything for them and never allow them to experience stress, they will not develop the ability to deal with the hardships that will inevitably come their way. It would be as though I never vaccinated them against stress.
  31. 31. TransformTeaching.org60 Project about “Hardships” What hardships or difficulties have you experienced? How did several of those hardships affect you? What did you learn from these difficulties? Make a list of three things that you survived. Write a list of recommendations to parents. For example: I was 16 years old and I went on a trip … (write about your experiences) Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 61 Project: Connect with people around the world Building International Bridges (BIBPenpals.com) Cab we build a global network? Are we ready to work in the Global Economy? Do we have contacts on the five continents? Can we put thoughts in our heads by using quotations? Project: Watch the video Read the directions at BIBPenpals.com What countries do you want to visit someday? What cities? There might be some people living in those cities who need your help to understand and practice English conversation. Read more below.
  32. 32. TransformTeaching.org62 From BIBPenpals.com Many students in the USA need service hours to show that they have helped in the community. This means spending time at a hospital or picking up trash in state parks. Volunteer hours can also be earned by using a computer. Hundreds of students are waiting online for a U.S. teenager to spend time helping international students improve their English skills. In return, the U.S. teenager can learn some phrases in another language and get hours for helping share the U.S. culture with people who dream about speaking English with a U.S. accent. For more information, ask students to contact me at (954) 646 8246 or call me on SKYPE at SteveEnglishTeacher or write to me t FreeEnglishlessons@gmail.com Paloma in Brazil: paloma_ortegas@hotmail.com France: benjamin.dumay@hotmail.fr Falvia (Brazil) fla_martins_88@hotmail.com Christian612@web.de bicycle enthusiast in Germany Facebook: ahmad.alzahri Saudi hospital administrator Spain: zarate_094@hotmail.com I spoke to these people by Skype and email: A teacher in Florianopolis, Brazil: Jaluif@yahoo.com.br SKYPE: Skype: Novinshahroudi mng.n.2006@gmail.com Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 63 Davitvanyan95 (skype) 16-year-old in Armenia These are sincere people who have sent me many requests for conversation practice: Thailand: m555kennel@gmail.com From India, living in Birmingham, England: wardagemini@hotmail.com skype warda12770 Tamara in Brazil: tamara_fernandes@hotmail.com SKYPE: EGYPT: eta1232002 an engineer http://bibpenpals.wordpress.com/2011/12/
  33. 33. TransformTeaching.org64 That’s the end of Part Two The Twelve Global Skills Now let’s go to the next part… Part Three We Are All Salespeople The best of Dan Pink’s website Project: Select a Product and Make a Pitch Read Mr. Pink’s Flipped Manifesto. Watch the “Jedi Mind Trick” video by Dan Pink. Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 65 Project: Select a Product and Make a Pitch Mr. Pink offers several videos about how to “pitch” (attempt to persuade). Choose one and create a pitch. Practice on a teacher. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvxtC60V6kc The six pitches in a 4-minute video. Search:    6 Elevator Pitches for the 21st Century Other resources http://www.danpink.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/sixpitches.pdf These are some tips to guide you in making the six pitches.
  34. 34. TransformTeaching.org66 Read Mr. Pink’s Flip Manifesto. The segment about “finding your passion” is intriguing because it is not what many teachers advise. What is your opinion of Mr. Pink’s suggestion? (From The Flip Manifesto) People ask, "What's your passion?" Ladies and gentlemen, I detest that question. When someone poses it to me, my innards tighten. My vocabulary becomes a palette of aahs and ums. My chest wells with the urge to flee. Oh my. The answer better be top-shelf—not some fumbling, bargain basement reply. But I know the responses I've formed in my head aren't especially good. Worse, they're probably not even accurate. And I'm not alone. The Flip Manifesto is located at http://danpink.s3.amazonaws.com/FLIP- Manifesto.pdf Or you can find it at www.TinyURL.com/danpinkflip Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 67 Click on Mr. Pink’s Facebook account. Go ahead. Leave a footprint. Make a mark. Leave your impact on the Internet. YourNetImpact.com
  35. 35. TransformTeaching.org68 Project: What is the Jedi Mind Trick? What does Dan Pink recommend? Search “Dan Pink Jedi Mind Trick persuade others” http://bigthink.com/videos/how-to-persuade-others-with-the-right-questions-jedi- mind-tricks-from-daniel-h-pink http://www.danpink.com/ac/how-to-persuade-others-with-the-right-questions-jedi- mind-tricks-from-daniel-h-pink/ So let me give you a hypothetical. Suppose that you're a parent and you have a daughter, say a teenage daughter, who's room is an absolute mess. It just looks like a bomb went off in there and you want your daughter to clean her room. You're trying to sell her on the idea of cleaning her room. What do you do? Well, you could try to bribe her and that might work in the short term. You could try to threaten her -- that might work in the short term. You can try to exhort her, you can try to, you know, tell her about the meaning of clean rooms. But there's actually a technique from actually the counseling literature really crystallized by a fellow named Mike Pantalon of Yale University called Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 69 motivational interviewing. And what you can do more effectively is ask two irrational questions. So, let's say that you have a daughter named Maria and Maria has a messy room and you want Maria to clean her room. The two questions you could ask Maria are this: "Maria, on a scale of one to ten, one meaning I'm not ready at all; ten meaning I'm ready to do it right now. _______________, Maria, to _________________." Now, Maria's room is a pig sty so she's not going to give you a ten or a nine or even a five. Maybe she'll give you a two.So she says, "Dad, I'm a two." Well here's where the second question comes in and it's a really interesting counterintuitive question. You say to Maria, "Okay, Maria. You're a two. Why _______ _________________________?" Now our instincts as parents is to say -- as a parent of three kids I have this instinct very strongly. If my kid were to say to me I'm a two, I would say, "What, why are you a two? You should be a nine." Directed/Produced by Jonathan Fowler, Elizabeth Rodd, and Dillon Fitton Your project: a) Fill in the blanks above. This means that you will listen to the video that Dan Pink gave or you can find the transcript. b) What could you do to make this technique more popular? Could you write a blog post? Could you make a poster? Could you make a YouTube video?
  36. 36. TransformTeaching.org70 A Short Summary of Dan Pink’s first five books In July 2005 I received a book from Marshal Thurber. The book arrived by FedEx. It was July 3. I’ll always remember thinking, “Marshall must really respect me and this book. He sent it to my attention, so I better give it some time.” Thanks to Marshall, I was exposed to a book that I had ignored, since I wasn’t reading the New York Times Book Review regularly… which I do now via the Internet at “NYtimes book review” or http://www.nytimes.com/pages/books/review/index.html I learned later that AWNM is part of an exploration by Dan Pink about “what should teachers expose to students.” The books form a chain of topics that students might benefit from studying. Free Agent Nation (2001) was written after Dan Pink lost his job as a speech writer for Al Gore. Everyone will be unemployed at some point and we can redefine ourselves as “free agents” and create jobs and projects. Chapter 15 about “School is Out” has some of the best descriptions of the transformation of education that I’ve seen. The chapter appeared in Reason as an article: search at “school is out reason dan pink.” A Whole New Mind (2005) covers three areas where the creative person can move ahead: Asia, Automation and Abundance. Take a moment and search “asia, automation, abundance summary” and find this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syo6ecgclR0. The book has six sections that explore how we can build the right side of our brain. See the Oprah Interview: http://www.danpink.com/2008/10/my-favorite-interview- ever Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 71 Here is a comment that I posted on Pink’s website: When I heard that Oprah Winfrey had given Pink's book A Whole New Mind to 4000 graduates at Stanford University, I had to find out if Oprah had ever interviewed Dan Pink... and what a remarkable interview it is. I ask my students to watch it to find out why Oprah was so moved by the book and its ideas. Some of my students actually thank me for showing them page 133 (the FedEx question: "What do you see?"). It's an excellent question but I had to blacken out the answer so that my students (one at a time) can have a chance to experience the moment when the right side of the brain is given time to observe. a remarkable tool for middle school and especially high school. A required book in my classrooms. I have four copies floating around student homes at the moment. Thank you, Mr. Pink.
  37. 37. TransformTeaching.org72 Drive (2009) asks “What motivates us?” (in addition to money). After we get enough to cover our needs, the answers appear to be “autonomy, mastery and purpose.” His entertaining video on “RSA animate dan pink motivation” is worth ten minutes. To Sell Is Human (2010) opened my mind to the idea that we are all in sales. In 1983 I heard Zig Zigler point out that Columbus had to be a salesman. Guess what? We all have opportunities to move others to devote time or money or their energies to pursue some action that we want to see happen. We are all in sales. His manga book is called The Adventures of Johnny Bunko. It’s a quick read that ends with the suggestion that we can each “make our mark.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=163wRR87-Mg Learn more about these books and about Dan Pink by going to danpink.com. Personal History Project (inspired by Enrique Gonzalez) 73 END NOTE This workbook was inspired by a conversation with Enrique Gonzalez. Here is the link to the YouTube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DtYlx0aUPjU See TinyURL.com/SunEdPersonalHistory Find more projects with Matt Blazek’s work www.TinyURL.com/mattblazek www.TinyURL.com/blazekprojects Find more links at TransformTeaching.org and at www.TinyURL.com/projectsandportfolios
  38. 38. TransformTeaching.org74 Send comments to VisualAndActve@gmail.com and TheEbookman@gmail.com. Call me at (954) 646 8246 Send your comments to Mr. Steve at VisualAndActive@gmail.com. I’ll close with a quote from one of my students (in Lab 3): I really like history. I want to ask my grandmother about what she remembers. Can I really create a book with her memories and give it to her? Answer: Yes. Go to TransformTeaching.org and click on “Interview your grandmother” TinyURL.com/SunEdPersonalHistory http://tinyurl.com/sunedproject
  39. 39. Proof Printed By Createspace Digital Proofer

The Personal History Workbook by Enrique Gonzalez lets students learn history backwards. Start with something relevant and work byack to the Egyptians.

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