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Juvinile crime

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Juvenile Justice Act
Juvenile Justice Act
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Juvinile crime

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What is Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Crimes in India, What is Juvenile Delinquency, what are their causes and reasons, what is juvenile Justice , Comparison Between Juenile Justice Act 2000 and Juvenile Justice Act 2015, Case study, Pros and cons for Juvenile Justice Act and conclusion

What is Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Crimes in India, What is Juvenile Delinquency, what are their causes and reasons, what is juvenile Justice , Comparison Between Juenile Justice Act 2000 and Juvenile Justice Act 2015, Case study, Pros and cons for Juvenile Justice Act and conclusion

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Juvinile crime

  1. 1. JUVENILE JUSTICE ACT Presented By : Divya Chauhan MBA – 3rd Semester
  2. 2. J De l uvenile inquency Healthy relations between Parentsand children GoodEducation system Religionandspirituality Companions Meditation Lawsandregulations HighMoral values Culture& tradition Counselling
  3. 3. The Juvenile Delinquent is a child trying to act like a grown up. It is an expression of unsatisfied desire and urges. Juvenile Delinquency refers to the anti-social acts of children and of young people under age which means the failure of children to meet certain obligations expected of them by the society..
  4. 4. Delinquencyisakindof abnormality when an individual deviatesfrom the courseof normal social life.. Act of delinquency mayinclude: 1. Running away from home 2. Habitual behavior beyond the control ofparents. 3. Spending time idly beyondlimits 4. Useof vulgar languages 5. Wandering about rail roads, streets marketplaces 6. Visiting gambling centers 7. Committing sexualoffences 8. Shop-lifting 9. Stealing
  5. 5. LonelinessPOVERTY Tensions Depression Divorces Money Fever
  6. 6. Other Reasons • Cozylifestyle • Low intelligence and academicfailure • Hyperactivity andimpulsivity • Engagementin Socialnetworking sites • Lackof Direction • Quantity but not qualityeducation • Communication gap • Unhealthy competition • Family conflict
  7. 7. CRIME uicids es SMOKING JAIL Creativity remainshidden NotInterested Unable to fulfill dreams
  8. 8. PROVISION JUVENILE JUSTICE ACT 2000 JUVENILE JUSTICE ACT 2015 Treatmentof juveniles All children under the age of 18 years treated equally. Maximum penalty for juvenile in conflict withlaw is three years. Juveniles aged between 16-18 years committing serious or heinous offences could be tried as adults. However, there will be no death penalty or life imprisonment. Juvenile Justice Board Conducts inquiry and directsthe juvenile to be placed in any fit institution for a period not exceeding three years. Adds a preliminary inquiry, conducted in certain cases by JJB to determine whether a child is placed in a home or sent to Children’s Court to be tried as an adult. ChildWelfare Committee Disposing of cases for childrenin need of care and protection; Frequency of meetings not specified. Functions are same as in the Act; training of members to be done within two months of Bill becoming law Committee to meet at least 20 days in a month. Appeals Appeal to the Session Court within 30 days of JJB order; further appeal toa High Court. Appeal JJB/CWC order within 30 days to Children’s Court, further High Court (District Magistrate for foster care,etc). Adoption No provision for inter-country adoption in the Act; theGuidelines Inter-country adoption allowed if adoption cannot take place withinthe Comparison Between Justice Act 2000 and Juvenile Justice Act2015
  9. 9. CASE STUDY
  10. 10. P has committed rape. P’s case is committed to the session court after charged sheet is filed. P for the first time before the session court raises the plea that he was 16 years old on the date offence. • The session court is obligated to deal with P’s plea under section 7-Aof JJA2000. •The session court should “make an inquiry” and “record a finding” weather P is a juvenile or not. As previously mentioned, the session court will first seek documentary proof, and only in the absence of such proof, will P be sent for medical examination to ascertain his age. •On enquiry, if P is found to be below 18 years old on the date of offence, his casewill be transferred to the JJB and his custody to the observation home. If P is found to be above 18 years of age on the date of offence, P’s criminal case will continue before the session court. •It is necessary to recall that the provision to section 7-A OF JJA 2000 states that a claim of juvenility may be raised before any court and it shall be recognized at any stage, even after final disposal of the case.
  11. 11. Pros for Juvenile Justice Act  Juvenile Justice Amendment Act protects women: If steps are not taken to prevent juveniles from escaping the gallows, crimes against women will continue to be perpetuated in society.  Punishment should befit crime: Providing the violent juvenile convict with a job and money following his release after he brutalised, raped and killed a young girl is tantamount to incentivising crime. It gives a wrong message to poor sections where crime may be seen as a stepping stone for better opportunities.  What about crimes committed with full knowledge: For juveniles aged between 16 to 18, punishment should be given in cases such as the Nirbhaya juvenile convict where there is complete understanding regarding the implications of the crime.  Criminals are exploiting the juvenile justice system: With increasing number of organised crime networks exploiting the juvenile justice system and the loopholes, the Juvenile JusticeAmendment Act will come as a welcome relief and deterrent for such evildoers.
  12. 12. Cons For Juvenile Justice Act  Juvenile courts are not child savers: For their efforts to prevent juvenile criminals from being tried in court, juvenile courts and specialists were called child savers. How can juvenile courts be called child savers?  Rehabilitation is possible in some cases: Rising violent crime rates have been testing the juvenile justice system in many countries. But the Bill does not make provisions for rehabilitation which is possible in some cases.  Juvenile justice homes are mere warehouses: They do nothing to address the problem of rehab and neither does the Juvenile Justice Bill.  Human mind not completely developed: Studies have shown that human mind is not completely developed till the age of 25 and juveniles are poorest of the poor. Often, such children forced into smuggling and prostitution have either no knowledge or choice. It is unfair to punish a child as an adult.  Juvenile Justice Homes are hell holes: Homes also lack trained counsellors and nearly 40% of the criminals lapsed back into crime on account of negligence from the authorities.
  13. 13. CONCLUSION  Attitude and perception towards Child Rights needs a change.  The laws enacted requires to be effectively implemented to achieve the desired goal of welfare of the children.  The society must encourage children's participation in matters effecting their rights as services to the children are no longer a charity.  The judiciary has played an appreciable role and contributed a lot in proper and beneficial implementation of the juvenile justice legislation by interpreting the provisions of Juvenile Justice Acts so as to provide maximum benefit and relief to the maximum number of the juveniles covered under the beneficial and favourable legislation.  A good intended legislation, properly and sincerely implemented and visionary interpreted, can significantly reverse the crime trends in the juveniles.

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