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Kings of Engagement: How Gaming Changed the World of UX

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Gaming is insanely huge and the world of user experience catches up fast. In this deck you will gain understanding on what games are, learn about the hero and the villain products, and how to build a product as a game from the ground up.

Publié dans : Design
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  • @Paolo Gambardella I do speak in general terms. So many different games under the umbrella of F2P games and casual. But when asking Candy Crush heavy users why do they keep on playing, usually the asnwer is that they don't know. Feedback is not everything, but on certain games I find it the #1 factor for getting hooked. It is definitly not the story, or competence, or character growth. It is pure addiction caused by the need for Dopamine
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  • f2p is a way to sell games. League of Legends, for example, is a free to play game. There is an error from the slide #87, I guess you wanna talk about "casual" games, not free2play. Another mistake is to think that every casual game is simply a feedback machine. A casual game is a game designed for short sessions and with a repetitive gameplay. A game designed for who cannot or does not want to play an hardcore game. Feedback is really important, but for the best there is not everything, at all. The example you make, Candy Crush Saga, is a great example of well designed casual game. It is not simply a matter of marketing, that game is designed around the player, using well known mechanics and combining them perfectly.
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Kings of Engagement: How Gaming Changed the World of UX

  1. A clickbait title to generate clicks or an amazingly true statement?
  2. You are reading this, so the first part is true.
  3. I will take the next few slides to prove the second.
  4. In 5-7 minutes, you too will learn how gaming changed the world Of UX.
  5. Something’s wrong with the world today, I don’t know what it is...
  6. But humanity spends 3 Billion hours a week playing games.
  7. We are playing various games, like Call of Duty and GTA...
  8. But also very weird games..
  9. like this one. Cookie clicker
  10. A game created for the sole purpose of clicking on cookies, which in time generate more cookies… to infinity and beyond. Everybody in the crowd playing Cookie Clicker say “Yeaaaaaa!!!”
  11. And how about the title Papers, Please, where you take the role of an immigration officer
  12. Deciding who is eligible in your communist country and who is excluded for good?
  13. How boring this sounds, and yet, more than 1 mil people found it interesting enough to pay for it.
  14. If you want to know what engagement truly looks like, take a look at the work of Phil Toledano.
  15. A photographer who took pictures of gamers while at play.
  16. Photo by Phil Toledano
  17. I know of only two conditions where the human face look like this. One of them is while playing games.
  18. Based on slides 3-19, I think that we can safely say that games are...
  19. Kings of Engagement
  20. Has gaming changed the world?
  21. During the 70’s and 80’s, gaming was a thing for young male geeks, no more.
  22. Until non-gaming apparatuses- PC, Facebook and mobile, brought gaming to the masses.
  23. 1972 20091982 1988 2008 1 7
  24. It caught like wildfire.
  25. Now Everybody is a Gamer!
  26. 1 Billion $$ in 3 days
  27. Acquired by Amazon for 1 Bil $
  28. I stumbled upon a Business Insider list, titled “The Richest YouTube Stars”.
  29. And guess what? 15 out of 20 review games! You know the top dog:
  30. PewDiePie. 32 mil subscribers That’s twice as much as Rihanna.
  31. Is Gaming Changing the World of UX?
  32. The single most important thing for a game designer is the user experience.
  33. Games are all about user experience.
  34. Let’s Recap Games are kings of engagement. The world is playing. Changing the world of UX.
  35. It’s no wonder that everybody wants a piece of the gaming pie.
  36. And everyone would like to put the engagement ring on their user’s finger... Using games as their matchmaker.
  37. In the rest of the deck, you will gain more understanding of games...
  38. And I’ll give 2 different examples of great game- like experiences in non-game environments.
  39. But hey, we haven’t been properly introduced!
  40. doriadar@gmail.com @ Dori Adar My Name is Dori Adar. A speaker, deck builder, game maker, ice cream eater. Find my latest decks here: www.doriadar.com
  41. Today’s Agenda 1. the ingredients of a game 2. The hero product 3. the villain product
  42. 1 The ingredients of a game
  43. I’m going to take a high level approach on this one.
  44. A Game Components Rules Objectives
  45. Components: Board, soldiers Rules: A turn based game, a certain movement to each soldier etc. Objectives: Kill your opponent’s king
  46. But a game is not going to go anywhere, unless it provides constant feedback.
  47. Visual feedback, sure. But not only. Feedback is more than that. Lives High score Progress bar
  48. Feedback is the engine that drives the plot forward, in the form of a loop.
  49. Kill monsters Get treasure Buy weapons Repeat Here’s the classic RPG loop
  50. Components Rules Objectives Feedback Feedback So now we have it. A game. How simple to grasp.
  51. Why can’t our lives be more like games?
  52. Why do we rarely have clear goals and objectives in life?
  53. Why is feedback, AKA “Good job!”, seldom given? Photo by Sarah Reid
  54. No wonder we are getting hooked on feedback provided to us by social media. We yearn for it.
  55. Social products are “gamified” by nature, presenting view counts and like counts. This is the equivalent of user score.
  56. Other products might enhance game mechanics, usually score and badges. This is known as gamification.
  57. And there are a few examples of products built like games from the ground up.
  58. I find those the most interesting. Here are two examples:
  59. Adventure Free to Play
  60. Heroes Villains
  61. 2 The hero product
  62. Adventure games emphasize character growth. Leveling up and acquiring skills are the brick and mortar of this genre.
  63. This can come in handy when a product’s goal is to educate.
  64. Components Rules Objectives is an adventure game A man and his keyboard, interactive lessons etc. Finish lessons to acquire dev skills. Learn to code!
  65. But learning to code is a long term goal. As in adventure games, “saving the world” goes through mid term and short term objectives.
  66. Codacademy make smart use of short and mid-term objectives.
  67. Mid term goals Short term goals
  68. And what about our engine? Well, Codeacademy’s interactive nature is ripe for feedback loops.
  69. Immediate feedback when writing code Community feedback (multi-player)
  70. Feedback Feedback And some badges and progress bars, off course.
  71. Codeacademy is considered to be a shining example of gamification done right.
  72. I find Codeacademy not a gamified product, but a game whose purpose is to teach code.
  73. That’s a major difference.
  74. One thing though, that could make Codeacademy an even better game, is the badass factor.
  75. Games make us feel badass.
  76. badass!
  77. Codeacademy still doesn’t make me feel like a coding ninja… yet.
  78. I think they will get there eventually.
  79. 3 the villain product
  80. Casual games, especially the free to play ones, are different than adventure games.
  81. Whereas adventure games emphasize the hero within us,
  82. Casual games focus on our need for constant “feel-good” feedback.
  83. Hence, here’s my definition of a F2P game (Free 2 play):
  84. A F2P game is a feedback machine that is built and shaped to bring you the best feedback experience.
  85. Spotting patterns A small, low effort act Anticipation The variable reward Here’s the addictive Candy Crush feedback loop.
  86. Tinder uses the exact same feedback loop. Let’s see it in action.
  87. We love spotting patterns. And we love looking at (eye) candies. Lucky us, everyone on Tinder looks just marvelous! Spotting patterns
  88. A small, mindless act, not requiring any real brain effort. A small, low effort act
  89. Anticipation. Did I make it? Did he like me too? Waiting... Anticipation
  90. And the reward, which is also of a variable outcome. Not all people are created equal, what can you do. The variable reward
  91. Here’s the thing about Tinder objectives.
  92. There’s a long term objective (that may vary)
  93. A mid term objective
  94. And the ultimate short term objective. The match.
  95. Waiting... Spotting patterns A small, low effort act Anticipation The variable reward
  96. The beauty of Tinder is that unlike Candy Crush, it does solve a real problem.
  97. Hell, I just went to a Tinder wedding a couple of weeks ago. (Mazal Tov Sharon and Dudi! Was awesome!)
  98. Similar to Codeacademy, I do not see it as mere gamification.
  99. Tinder uses the mechanics of a casual game, from the ground up.
  100. Alright kids,Let’s wrap it up.
  101. 1 The ingredients of a game Components Rules Objectives Feedba ck Feedback
  102. 2 The hero product Components Rules Objectives Feedba ck Feedback
  103. 3 The villain product Components Rules Objectives Feedba ck Feedback The most important
  104. Famous last words: When building products… think like a game designer.
  105. Thank you doriadar@gmail.com doriadar.com And one more thing... Thank you Sarah Keyes for editing the slides so elegantly.
  106. Play Games Cause you’ll learn from it, get tons of inspiration, and most important: it’s fun!

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