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Ossiannilsson lth 10juni2019

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LTH, Lund presentation on global challenges and quality related concerns in the changing learning landscape 10 June 2019

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Ossiannilsson lth 10juni2019

  1. 1. Omvärldsbevakning i ett förändrat lärande landskap • Professor, Dr. Ebba Ossiannilsson • Svenska Riksorganisationen för Distansutbildning, Svenska Riksorganisationen för e-kompetens • Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition Sweden • Internationell kvalitetsgranskare ICDE; EDATU • ICDE OER Advocacy Committee, Chair • ICDE Ambassador for the global advocacy of OER • EDEN, EC, EDEN SIG TEL QE, EDEN Fellow • Open Education Europa Ambassador and Fellow • ISO/TC 176, Quality Management and quality assurance • ISO Educational organizations -- Management systems for educational organizations -- Requirements with guidance for use, ISO 21001:2018 • ISO Future Concepts • SIS, SIS/TK 304 Kvalitetsledning (validering av individuell kompetens)
  2. 2. AGENDA Förmiddag: Var är vi idag? Omvärldsbevakning Gruppreflektioner Eftermiddag: Kvalitets och framgångsomåden Diskutera, reflektera, relatera till er verksamhet på LTH
  3. 3. Global Challenges
  4. 4. The fourth Industrial Revolution requires the social revolution as well: SOCIAL EMOTIONAL COLLABORATIVE EMPHATIC IDENTITY JUST FOR ME JUST IN TIME PERSONAL/ COLLABORATIVE
  5. 5. 4e industriella revolutionen, förändrar vårt sätt att: Agera Reagera Kommunicera Arbeta Leva Interagera Relatera Älska Lära
  6. 6. WHATS THE ROLE OF EDUCATION • EDUCATION NEEDS TO AIM TO DO MORE THAN TO PREAPRE YOUNG PEOPLE FOR THE WORLD OF WORK. • IT NEEDS TO EQUIP STUDENTS WITH THE SKILLS TEHY NEED TO BECOME ACTIVE, RESPONSIBLE AND ENGAGED CITICENS Just for me, and just in time learning
  7. 7. Personal learning is like shopping at a grocery store. You need to assemble the ingredients yourself and create your own meals. It’s harder, but it’s a lot cheaper, and you can have an endless variety of meals. Sure, you might not get the best meals possible, but you control the experience, and you control the outcome. Personalized learning is like being served at a restaurant. Someone else selects the food and prepares it. There is some customization – you can tell the waiter how you want your meat cooked – but essentially everyone at the restaurant gets
  8. 8. NMC 2019
  9. 9. Ferguson, R., Coughlan, T., Egelandsdal, K., Gaved, M., Herodotou, C., Hillaire, G., Jones, D., Jowers, I., Kukulska- Hulme, A., McAndrew, P., Misiejuk, K., Ness, I. J., Rienties, B., Scanlon, E., Sharples, M., Wasson, B., Weller, M. and Whitelock, D. (2019). Innovating Pedagogy 2019: Open University Innovation Report 7. Milton Keynes: The Open University. Themes Playful learning Learning with robots Decolonising learning Drone-based learning Learning through wonder Action learning Virtual studios Place-based learning Making thinking visible Roots of Empathy Themes from previous reports
  10. 10. OPEN PEDAGOGY, (Hegarty, 2016)
  11. 11. NEW TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS ARE NEEDED NEW PEDAGOGIES NEW SUBJECTS, DISCIPLINES, NEW CONTENTS NEW TOOLS EC, ANUSCA FERRARI, 4 JUNE 2019 Photo by salvatore ventura on Unsplas
  12. 12. (2012)
  13. 13. The Digital Skills Toolkit forms part of ITU's commitment to the Global Initiative on Decent Jobs for Youth to tackle youth unemployment, for which it leads the digital skills thematic area Digital Competence Framework for Educators (DigCompEdu)
  14. 14. Breakout: Diagnosticera er samlade bild av gruppens digitala färdigheter/förm ågor enligt smällkaramellen Individuell diagnosticering av vardera sex områden Gruppvis reflektion Presentation jfr SAMR Modellen
  15. 15. Kvalitets och framgångsområden i det förändrade lärande landskapet Del 2
  16. 16. • Multifaceted • Dynamic • Mainstreamed • Representative • Multifunctional Ossiannilsson, E., Williams, K., Camilleri, A., & Brown, M. (2015). Quality models in online and open education around the globe: State of the art and recommendations. Oslo: ICDE.
  17. 17. LEARNERS Flexibility Interactivity Accessibility Personal Transparency Participation Presence Trust An overview of quality domains and dimensions in Open Online Flexible, and TEL OOFAT), and success factors from the learners’ perspectives (Ossiannilsson, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2018; Ossiannilsson et al., 2015). MACRO, MESO, MICRO AND NANO LEVEL
  18. 18. Course design • 10 Each course includes a clear statement of learning outcomes in respect of both knowledge and skills. There is reasoned coherence between learning goals/outcomes, the teaching and learning activities, the learning materials and the assessment methods. • 11 Learning outcomes determine the use of methods and course contents. In a blended- learning context there is an explicit rationale for the use of each element in the blend. • 12 The design, development and evaluation of a course involves individuals or teams with expertise in both academic and technical aspects. • 13 OER and other third-party material is selected with regard to learning outcome, tailored if necessary for fit to the learning context, and integrated with other learning materials. These materials are subject to the same review processes as other course materials. • 14 E-learning materials have sufficient interactivity (student-to-content, student-to-student and student- to- teacher) to encourage active engagement and enable students to test their knowledge, understanding and skills. • 15 Independent learning materials provide learners with regular feedback through self-assessment activities or tests. • 16 Courses conform to explicit guidelines concerning layout and presentation and are as consistent as possible across a programme. • 17 Courses provide both formative and summative assessment. Assessment is explicit, fair, valid and reliable. Appropriate measures are in place to prevent impersonation and/or plagiarism, especially where assessments are conducted online. • 18 Course materials, including the intended learning outcomes, are reviewed by expert educators prior to first use, and then regularly reviewed, up-dated and improved using feedback from stakeholders. Kear, K., Rosewell, J., Williams, K., Ossiannilsson, E., Covadonga Rodrigo, C., (UNED), Sánchez-Elvira Paniagua, A, Santamaría Lancho, M., André Vyt, A., Harvey Mellar, H. (2016). Final Editing: Karen Kear. K., and Rosewell, J., coordinated by: George Ubachs, G. (EADTU), and Lizzie Konings, L. (EADTU). Quality Assessment for E-learning a Benchmarking Approach
  19. 19. Staff support • 25 Staff in academic, media development and administrative roles can adequately support the development and delivery of e-learning elements and activities. • 26 The institution ensures that appropriate training and support is provided for staff and that this training is enhanced in the light of technological and educational developments. • 27 Educational research and innovation in e-learning are regarded as high status activities, and are promoted by career development incentives. • 28 There are mechanisms for the dissemination of good practice based on experience and research on e- learning. • 29 The institution ensures that issues of staff workload, and any other implications of staff participation in e- learning activities, are taken into account when managing courses or programmes. • 30 Adequate support and resources (e.g. technical helpdesk and administrative support) are available to academic staff, including any affiliated tutors/mentors. Kear, K., Rosewell, J., Williams, K., Ossiannilsson, E., Covadonga Rodrigo, C., (UNED), Sánchez-Elvira Paniagua, A, Santamaría Lancho, M., André Vyt, A., Harvey Mellar, H. (2016). Final Editing: Karen Kear. K., and Rosewell, J., coordinated by: George Ubachs, G. (EADTU), and Lizzie Konings, L. (EADTU). Quality Assessment for E-learning a Benchmarking Approach
  20. 20. Student support • 31 Students are provided with clear and up-to-date information about their courses, including learning and assessment methods. • 32 Students are provided with guidelines stating their rights, roles and responsibilities and those of their institution. Guidelines of specific relevance to e- learning include provision of hardware, information on accessibility and expected participation in collaborative activities. • 33 Social media opportunities are provided in order to build and support students communities. This may be achieved using the institution’s VLE or through external social media, as appropriate • 34 Students have access to support services including technical helpdesk, administrative support and course choice advice • 35 Students have access to learning resources, including online library access, study skills development and a study advisor, and they receive guidelines and training in using these resources. Kear, K., Rosewell, J., Williams, K., Ossiannilsson, E., Covadonga Rodrigo, C., (UNED), Sánchez-Elvira Paniagua, A, Santamaría Lancho, M., André Vyt, A., Harvey Mellar, H. (2016). Final Editing: Karen Kear. K., and Rosewell, J., coordinated by: George Ubachs, G. (EADTU), and Lizzie Konings, L. (EADTU). Quality Assessment for E-learning a Benchmarking Approach
  21. 21. InamoratadosSantosetal,JRC,2016
  22. 22. Considerations for quality assurance of e-learning provision - ENQA
  23. 23. Some good examples
  24. 24. Children are the future – and increasingly they’re taking charge of it. Just look at 16-year-old Greta Thunberg, who has inspired young people around the world to protest against the growing climate crisis. Conversation 6 June, 2019
  25. 25. Diskutera, reflektera, relatera till er verksamhet vid LTH
  26. 26. CARING IS SHARING, SHARING IS CARING My Footprints www.i4quality.se Ebba.Ossiannilsson@gmail.com info@i4qulity.se

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