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ALL ABOUT EGGS.pptx

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ALL ABOUT EGGS.pptx

  1. 1.  1. Shell. The egg‘s outer covering, the shell, accounts for about 9 to 12 % of its total weight depending on egg size.  2. Air cell. This is the empty space between the white and shell at the large end of the egg which is barely existent in newly laid egg. When an egg is first laid, it is warm.  3. Albumen/Egg white. Albumen, also called egg white, accounts for most of an egg‘s liquid weight, about 67%. This is produced by the oviduct and consists of four alternating layers of thick and thin consistencies.  4. Chalaza. This is the ropey strands of egg white at both sides of the egg, which anchor the yolk in place in the center of the thick white.  5. Germinal Disc. This is the entrance of the latebra, the channel leading to the center of the yolk. The germinal disc is barely noticeable as a slight depression on the surface of the yolk.  6. Membranes. There are two kinds of membranes, one just under the shell and the other covering the yolk. These are the shell membrane and the vitelline membrane. Just inside the shell are two shell membranes, inner and outer.
  2. 2.  In culinary - it can be the main protein dish; it can be a main or accessory ingredient in dishes from appetizers to desserts. It can be cooked by dry heat, moist heat, with or without oil, as simply or as elaborately as one‘s inclination for the moment.  Cooked and served  As an emulsifier  As a foam  Stages in Foam Formation  A. frothy – large air bubbles that flow easily  B. soft foam – air cells are smaller and more numerous; foam becomes whiter; soft peaks are formed when beater is lifted  C. stiff foam – peaks hold their shape; when bowl is tipped, it holds, moist and glossy  D. dry – moistness and glossiness disappear; specks of egg white are seen
  3. 3. Here are some tips on how to handle eggs: Purchasing: Do not buy dirty, cracked, or outdated eggs. Storage:  1. Store at 45 o F or below.  2. Store in closed container.  3. Store away from strong odors.  4. Refrigerate leftover egg dishes in shallow containers.  5. Do not allow drippings to contaminate eggs. Preparation/Cooking:  1. Keep refrigerated before and after cooking.  2. Keep everything clean.  3. Use only clean, not cracked eggs.  4. Cook thoroughly.  5. Wash container used for egg thoroughly.  6. Use egg separator
  4. 4. Fresh shell eggs Buy best before date Left-over yolks or whites Within 2 to 4 days Hard-Cooked eggs Within 1 week Prepared egg dishes Within 3 to 4 days Pickled eggs Within 1 month Frozen whole eggs (blended) Within 4 months
  5. 5. 1. Sunny side up—Cook slowly without flipping until white is completely set but yolk is still soft and yellow. Heat must be low or bottom will toughen or burn before top is completely set. 2. Basted—Do not flip. Add a few drops of water to pan and cover to steam cook the top. A thin film of coagulated white will cover the yolk which should remain liquid. 3. Over easy—Fry and flip over. Cook just until the white is just set but the yolk is still liquid. 4. Over medium— Fry and flip over. Cook until the yolk is partially set. 5. Over hard— Fry and flip over. Cook until the yolk is completely set.

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