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9 / 1 8 / 2 0 1 2
EFFECTIVE
COMMUNICATION
FOCUSING QUESTIONS
• What is a primary reason people fail in collaborative
efforts?
• What are key components in sending a...
COMMUNICATING AS COLLABORATORS,
CONSULTANTS AND TEAM MEMBERS
• Communication is one of the greatest
achievements by humank...
PARTNER SHARE
• With a partner, discuss ways that you
communicate.
• What devices do you use?
• Who do you communicate wit...
COMMUNICATION FOR EFFECTIVE
SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS
• Teachers manage many kinds
of relationships in their work
with students...
WAYS THAT COMMUNICATION
HAS CHANGED
• We e-mail the person in the office
next door.
• We have a list of 15 phone
numbers t...
FACE-TO-FACE COMMUNICATION
• Computers, cell phones, the internet,
and television have changed
communication in the last d...
COMMUNICATION FOR SPECIAL
EDUCATORS
• A supportive, communicative
relationship among special
education teachers, general
c...
CHALLENGES IN COMMUNICATING
EFFECTIVELY
• Because the development and
use of “people skills” is the most
difficult aspect ...
DISCUSSION
• Discuss with a partner how special educators need
to communicate and who they need to
communicate with. Think...
VERBAL ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATION
• Body language is important. A
message is 7% verbal, 38% vocal,
and 55% facial.
• Differi...
NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
• 6 categories: eye contact, gestures,
paralanguage (volume, rate, pitch,
and pronunciation of the...
GENDER DIFFERENCES
IN COMMUNICATION
• Differences in communication
style between males and
females:
• Amount of time liste...
CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN
COMMUNICATION
• Because language and culture are
so inextricably bound together,
communicating wit...
BUILDING SKILLS FOR
COMMUNICATING
• Effective communicators can do
the following:
• Rapport building
• Responsive listenin...
RAPPORT-BUILDING SKILLS
• When we take time to build positive
relationships that are based on mutual
respect and trust, ot...
RAPPORT BUILDING SKILLS
• We are more likely to:
• Listen to and try to understand their
unique situations.
• Accept them ...
RESPONSIVE LISTENING SKILLS
• Successful consultants listen
responsively and empathically in
order to build trust and prom...
3 MAJOR COMPONENTS OF
RESPONSIVE LISTENING
• Nonverbal listening-discerning
others’ needs and observing their
nonverbal ge...
ASSERTIVENESS
• The basic aspects of assertive
communication are:
• Use an “I” message instead of
a “you” message.
• Say “...
THE ART OF APOLOGIZING
• Apologizing demonstrates
understanding, honesty,
confidence, and trust.
• It offers a chance to m...
GROUP THINK
• In groups of three or four,
• Please jot down skills that you have learned tonight
for more effective commun...
ROADBLOCKS TO COMMUNICATION
• Barriers to successful interaction,
halting the development of effective
collaborative relat...
NONVERBAL ROADBLOCKS
• Include facing away when the
speaker talks or looking at
another person in the room when
the speake...
VERBAL ROADBLOCKS
• Judging- criticizing, name calling, and
diagnosing why a person is behaving a
particular way.
• Sendin...
TERMS, LABELS, AND PHRASES AS
ROADBLOCKS
• Do not focus on the disability label.
• Do not portray successful people
with d...
DISCUSSION
• With a partner, discuss some of the roadblocks
mentioned here.
• Can you think of other roadblocks to
communi...
MANAGING RESISTANCE, NEGATIVITY,
ANGER , AND CONFLICT
• Communication is the key to collaboration and
problem solving.
• W...
RESISTANCE TO CHANGE
• Why do people resist change?
• Have a vested interest in the
status quo
• Have low tolerance for ch...
WHY COLLABORATIVE
PARTNERS RESIST: EXAMPLES
• Classroom teachers won’t share how they really feel
about working with excep...
HOW TO DEAL WITH
RESISTANCE AND NEGATIVITY
• Negative people sap the energy of
educational consultants. It can block
commu...
WHY PEOPLE GET ANGRY
• Anger is felt when a situation is perceived as unfair
or threatening, and the person angered feels
...
HOW TO DEAL WITH ANGER
• Address the problem rather than the person.
• Seek to find a shared goal with the angry person.
•...
WITH A PARTNER
• Discuss ways that you have dealt with negativity
and anger in a professional environment.
• What are some...
WHY CONFLICT OCCURS IN
SCHOOL CONTEXTS
• Conflict occurs when there are unreconciled differences
among people in terms of ...
HOW TO RESOLVE SCHOOL-RELATED
CONFLICTS
• First listen responsively and acknowledge
what is being said.
• The listener mus...
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effective communication in co-teaching

effective communication in co-teaching

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effective communication in co-teaching

  1. 1. 9 / 1 8 / 2 0 1 2 EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION
  2. 2. FOCUSING QUESTIONS • What is a primary reason people fail in collaborative efforts? • What are key components in sending and receiving messages? • How does one establish rapport in order to facilitate effective communication? • What are major verbal and nonverbal skills for communicating effectively? • What are the primary roadblocks to communication? • What are some important things to keep in mind when using electronic communications and social networking?
  3. 3. COMMUNICATING AS COLLABORATORS, CONSULTANTS AND TEAM MEMBERS • Communication is one of the greatest achievements by humankind. • It involves talking, listening, managing interpersonal conflict, and addressing concerns together. • Good communication skills facilitate problem solving and resolution of conflicts. • Elements of trust, commitment, and effective interaction are critical for conflict-free relationships.
  4. 4. PARTNER SHARE • With a partner, discuss ways that you communicate. • What devices do you use? • Who do you communicate with? • What are different forms of communication?
  5. 5. COMMUNICATION FOR EFFECTIVE SCHOOL RELATIONSHIPS • Teachers manage many kinds of relationships in their work with students who have special needs. • Communication is the key to successful relationships. • Communication has become simpler and more complex due to modern technology.
  6. 6. WAYS THAT COMMUNICATION HAS CHANGED • We e-mail the person in the office next door. • We have a list of 15 phone numbers to reach our family. • We pull up in our driveway and use our cell phone to see if anyone is home to help carry in the groceries. • We get up in the morning and go online before getting our coffee.
  7. 7. FACE-TO-FACE COMMUNICATION • Computers, cell phones, the internet, and television have changed communication in the last decade. • Face-to-face interactions are still the standard and the most effective type of communication for most collaboration. • People typically communicate 70% of their waking moments. • Lack of effective communication skills is a major reason for work-related failure.
  8. 8. COMMUNICATION FOR SPECIAL EDUCATORS • A supportive, communicative relationship among special education teachers, general classroom teachers, students, and their families is critical to the success of children with exceptional learning needs in inclusive classrooms. • Special educators must model exemplary communication and interaction skills.
  9. 9. CHALLENGES IN COMMUNICATING EFFECTIVELY • Because the development and use of “people skills” is the most difficult aspect of collaboration for many educators, more and more educators are stressing the need for specific training in collaboration and communication skills if they expect to help students with special needs be successful.
  10. 10. DISCUSSION • Discuss with a partner how special educators need to communicate and who they need to communicate with. Think of as many examples as you can.
  11. 11. VERBAL ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATION • Body language is important. A message is 7% verbal, 38% vocal, and 55% facial. • Differing values, ambiguous language, stereotypes, assumptions, and personal experiences all can serve as filters of language. • Miscommunication breeds misunderstanding.
  12. 12. NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION • 6 categories: eye contact, gestures, paralanguage (volume, rate, pitch, and pronunciation of the verbal communication), posture, overall facial expression, clothing, and setting chosen for the interaction. • Our facial expressions convey our thoughts and feelings.
  13. 13. GENDER DIFFERENCES IN COMMUNICATION • Differences in communication style between males and females: • Amount of time listening versus talking • Interrupting • Physical alignment during conversation • Use of indirectness and silence • Topical cohesion
  14. 14. CULTURAL DIFFERENCES IN COMMUNICATION • Because language and culture are so inextricably bound together, communicating with potential collaborative partners who are from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds is a very complex process. • Cultural differences can extend to use of space, touch, appearance, voice tone, and body language.
  15. 15. BUILDING SKILLS FOR COMMUNICATING • Effective communicators can do the following: • Rapport building • Responsive listening • Assertion • Conflict management • Collaborative problem solving Do you have these skills?
  16. 16. RAPPORT-BUILDING SKILLS • When we take time to build positive relationships that are based on mutual respect and trust, others are more likely to: • Want to work with us. • Care about our reactions to them. • Try to meet our expectations. • Accept our feedback and coaching • Imitate our behavior.
  17. 17. RAPPORT BUILDING SKILLS • We are more likely to: • Listen to and try to understand their unique situations. • Accept them as they are and not judge them for what they are not. • Respond appropriately to their concerns and criticisms • Advocate for, support, and encourage them in their efforts to serve student needs.
  18. 18. RESPONSIVE LISTENING SKILLS • Successful consultants listen responsively and empathically in order to build trust and promote understanding. • Responsive, effective listening makes it possible to gather information essential to one’s role in the education of children with special needs.
  19. 19. 3 MAJOR COMPONENTS OF RESPONSIVE LISTENING • Nonverbal listening-discerning others’ needs and observing their nonverbal gestures. • Encouraging the sending of messages – encouraging others to express themselves fully. • Showing understanding of the message – reviewing what they conveyed, or paraphrasing.
  20. 20. ASSERTIVENESS • The basic aspects of assertive communication are: • Use an “I” message instead of a “you” message. • Say “and” instead of “but.” • State the behavior objectively. • Name your own feelings. • Say what you want to happen. • Express concern for others. • Use assertive body language.
  21. 21. THE ART OF APOLOGIZING • Apologizing demonstrates understanding, honesty, confidence, and trust. • It offers a chance to mend fences • Make sure you do not repeat the behavior or mistake. • Allow them to vent, and then say “I’m sorry” as soon as possible.
  22. 22. GROUP THINK • In groups of three or four, • Please jot down skills that you have learned tonight for more effective communication. • Name any other skills you can think of.
  23. 23. ROADBLOCKS TO COMMUNICATION • Barriers to successful interaction, halting the development of effective collaborative relationships. • These are behaviors that send the message that “I’m not listening.” “It doesn’t matter what you think.” • Teachers send these signals by being busy, not concentrating, or using poor listening skills.
  24. 24. NONVERBAL ROADBLOCKS • Include facing away when the speaker talks or looking at another person in the room when the speaker says something • Displaying inappropriate facial expressions • Distractions such as repetitively tapping a pencil • Rattling pocket change • Checking message on the cell phone while “listening.”
  25. 25. VERBAL ROADBLOCKS • Judging- criticizing, name calling, and diagnosing why a person is behaving a particular way. • Sending solutions – directing or ordering, warning, moralizing or preaching, advising, and using logical arguments or lecturing. • Avoiding others’ concerns – implies “no big deal” to the message-receiver. “You’ll feel better tomorrow.”
  26. 26. TERMS, LABELS, AND PHRASES AS ROADBLOCKS • Do not focus on the disability label. • Do not portray successful people with disabilities as superhuman • Use people-first language – “student with autism” • Emphasize abilities and not limitations • Do not imply disease by saying “patient” or “case” when discussing disabilities.
  27. 27. DISCUSSION • With a partner, discuss some of the roadblocks mentioned here. • Can you think of other roadblocks to communication?
  28. 28. MANAGING RESISTANCE, NEGATIVITY, ANGER , AND CONFLICT • Communication is the key to collaboration and problem solving. • Without back and forth discussions, there can be no agreement. • Problem solving often breaks down because communications break down first.
  29. 29. RESISTANCE TO CHANGE • Why do people resist change? • Have a vested interest in the status quo • Have low tolerance for change • Feel strongly that the change would be undesirable. • Be unclear about what the change would entail or bring about. • Fear the unknown.
  30. 30. WHY COLLABORATIVE PARTNERS RESIST: EXAMPLES • Classroom teachers won’t share how they really feel about working with exceptional students. • They act excited about an idea when it is proposed but never get around to doing it. • They won’t discuss it with you, but they do so with others behind your back. • They take out their frustrations on the students. • They state that there is not enough time to implement the strategy • They are simply silent. • They make it clear that they just prefer the status quo.
  31. 31. HOW TO DEAL WITH RESISTANCE AND NEGATIVITY • Negative people sap the energy of educational consultants. It can block communication and ruin potentially productive relationships. • Do not engage in the negativity. • Refrain from taking negativity personally. • Control your own behavior. • Curb your own natural reaction to resistance. • Keep your eyes on the prize.
  32. 32. WHY PEOPLE GET ANGRY • Anger is felt when a situation is perceived as unfair or threatening, and the person angered feels helpless to rectify that situation. • Differences of opinions, values, and behaviors exacerbate these feelings. • Anger is a secondary feeling that follows frustration, unmet expectations, los of self-respect, or fear.
  33. 33. HOW TO DEAL WITH ANGER • Address the problem rather than the person. • Seek to find a shared goal with the angry person. • Defer judgment and together explore options. • When an angry person is loud and belligerent, speak more softly and calmly. • Listen intently with responsiveness, not reaction.
  34. 34. WITH A PARTNER • Discuss ways that you have dealt with negativity and anger in a professional environment. • What are some ways for resolving anger conflicts?
  35. 35. WHY CONFLICT OCCURS IN SCHOOL CONTEXTS • Conflict occurs when there are unreconciled differences among people in terms of needs, values, goals, and personalities. • Teachers, administrators, and parents face many occasions for conflict when they are involved with educating children who have special needs. • Parent goals and teacher goals may differ significantly, and support personnel may add even more dimensions to the conflict. • Do not react hastily and promise something the teacher can’t deliver. • Values – when people have differing values about children, education or educator roles within the learning context, effective communication is a challenging goal.
  36. 36. HOW TO RESOLVE SCHOOL-RELATED CONFLICTS • First listen responsively and acknowledge what is being said. • The listener must concentrate with an open mind and attend to the speaker’s feelings. • Consultants must put aside preconceived notions about their own expertise and learn from those who often know the student best – family and teachers. • After listening constructively, consultants need to help establish ground rules for resolving the conflict.

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