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Physical Self - UTS.pptx

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The physical self is the concrete dimension of the body, therefore the changes in the. physical characteristics of a person, which is distinguishable through the naked eye, is evident. through the changes in the physical self.

The physical self is the concrete dimension of the body, therefore the changes in the. physical characteristics of a person, which is distinguishable through the naked eye, is evident. through the changes in the physical self.

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Physical Self - UTS.pptx

  1. 1. SELF by GROUP 1 UNDErstanding the self
  2. 2. • refers to the body that includes basic parts such as head, neck, arms, and legs • made up of other organs such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, intestines, and muscles • in general, the body performs its functions least well during (1) infancy and (2) old age. • physical efficiency generally peaks in early adulthood and declines into the middle age. • physical development and growth during childhood continues at a slow rate compared with rapid rate of growth in babyhood. • One of the crucial stages of development is the adolescence stage. • it is a tangible aspect of the person that can be directly observed and examined
  3. 3. PHYSICAL SELF William James Sigmund Freud Wilhelm Reich • considered body as initial source of sensation and necessary for the origin and maintenance of personality. • it is an element of spiritual hygiene of supreme significance • in psychoanalytic school, construction of the self and personality makes the body and the core of human experience. • argued that mind and body are one. • all psychological processes, he postulated, are a part of physical processes, and vice versa
  4. 4. Erik Erikson Carl Jung B.F. Skinner There is entire discipline devoted to Physical Self "Hath-yoga", or the Yoga of the body. The Indian tradition views growth and enlightenment as the whole body event, which is not possible until one has a pure and strong body. • the role of bodily organs is especially important in early developmental stages of a person's life. Later in life, the development of physical as well as intellectual skills help determine whether the individual will achieve a sense of competence and ability to choose demanding roles in a complex society. • argued that the physical body and the external world can be known only as psychological experiences • says that the role of the body is of primary importance
  5. 5. PHYSICAL SELF Heredity (nature) Environment (nurture) • The development of the individual is caused by two interacting forces: heredity and environment. • the transmission of traits or characteristics from parents to offspring. • the sum total of the forces or experiences that a person undergoes from conception to old age.
  6. 6. Fertilization Zygote Genes • meeting of the egg cell and sperm cell • fertilized egg cell; contains all the hereditary potentials from the parents • true carriers of hereditary characteristics of the parents
  7. 7. PERIOD Conception to birth
  8. 8. Birth to end of the second week.
  9. 9. End of the second week to end of the second year.
  10. 10. PRESCHOOL AGE Two to six years.
  11. 11. ELEMENTARY AGE Six to ten or twelve years.
  12. 12. PREADOLESCENCE Twelve to thirteen or fourteen years.
  13. 13. Thirteen or fourteen to eighteen years.
  14. 14. Eighteen to forty years.
  15. 15. Forty to sixty years
  16. 16. SENESCENCE Sixty years to death.
  17. 17. • As a biological entity, the body has a functional role, but as a social entity it is the most visible way of expressing and presenting someone's identity. • Research found that a person who is perceived as attractive makes more money than a person of below-average looks. • In politics, voters who are not actively engaged in social and political issues choose candidates based on "looks" 90% of the time.
  18. 18. • May be attributed to a cognitive bias called the "halo effect," • A cognitive bias is an error in reasoning, evaluating, remembering, or any other mental process that is often a result of holding on to one's preferences and beliefs regardless of contrary information. • The "halo effect" refers to the tendency of people to rate attractive individuals more favorable for their personality traits or characteristics as compared to those who are less attractive.
  19. 19. • A significant aspect of culture that strongly influences adolescents who are in a face-to-face encounter with their physical selves is how their culture conceptualizes beauty. Young adolescents are forced to adhere to society’s definition of beauty lest they be labeled ugly. • This is what is called the social constructionist approach to understanding the physical self. This suggests that beauty, weight, sexuality, or race do not simply result from the collection of genes one inherited from one’s parents. Instead, these bodily features only take on the meaning that they have. A person may have a certain set of facial features, or weigh a certain number of pounds and attractiveness will come from the time and place in which they live.
  20. 20. • A woman is what she wears. This statement is from the work of Janes Gaines on fashion (1990) which implies that women are often defined completely by their clothing. In this study, it suggests that people have body images. • Body image is the mental representation one creates, but it may or may not bear close relation to how others actually see you. • Having a sense of understanding that healthy attractive bodies come in many shapes and sizes, and that physical appearance says very little about the character or value of a person. How to get to this point depends on the acceptance and esteem that a person has for himself.
  21. 21. BEAUTY • defined not with proportions, but rather with similarity between the left and right sides of the face. Symmetry • Biologists had also hypothesized that we prefer faces that epitomize the 'manliness' or 'femininity' of their gender.
  22. 22. • It was only in the most urbanized regions that they found the strong attraction to more masculine men and more feminine women; in the smaller, more remote communities, many women actually preferred the more "feminine" looking men.
  23. 23. ACROSS CULTURES • Since birth, the socialized body is subjected to cultural norms. The attitude towards the body and the bodily practices reflect the value constellation of each particular society. Karo tribes in Omo Valley, Ethiopia Neck rings Examples: Scarification
  24. 24. ACROSS CULTURES Examples: Body Modification Foot binding in China
  25. 25. • Our body image refers to how you perceive your physical body, whether you believe you are attractive, and how you believe others perceive your appearance. Body image is closely linked to self-esteem for many people (especially teenagers). TIME IS PHYSICAL BEAUTY IMPORTANT? • For many as their body changes, so does their image of themselves. So it is very important to re-frame the way we view, think and talk about our physical selves.
  26. 26. • Recognize that your body is your own, no matter what shape or size it comes in. Try to focus on how strong and healthy your body is and the things it can do. Not what's wrong with it or what you feel you want to change about it. No one's business but your own what your body is like. You have to be happy with yourself. " YOU ARE BEAUTIFUL ENOUGH "
  27. 27. S E L F - E S T E E M "We all know that self-esteem comes from what youthink of you, not what other people think of you" - Gloria Graynor
  28. 28. IMAGE • Cleaning your body every day. Personal Hygiene • Behaviors that must be practiced in daily life.
  29. 29. IMAGE • Face • Skin • Hair • Nails • Feet • Clothes • Shoes Good grooming
  30. 30. IMAGE • A skill for dealing with people and society. Social graces • Making proper introductions to people • Listening and not interrupting in conversation • Using good table manners • Eye contact • Body language.
  31. 31. IMAGE • Proper alignment of your body when standing or sitting. Proper bearing and posture
  32. 32. IMAGE • State of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. Health
  33. 33. UNDERSTANDING THE SELF listening! Group 1

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