Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Le téléchargement de votre SlideShare est en cours. ×

Jt presentation

Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Publicité
Chargement dans…3
×

Consultez-les par la suite

1 sur 27 Publicité
Publicité

Plus De Contenu Connexe

Diaporamas pour vous (19)

Similaire à Jt presentation (20)

Publicité

Plus récents (20)

Jt presentation

  1. 1. STUDENT ATHLETES & THE COLLEGE SEARCH 09/16/13 Jennifer “JT” Thomas
  2. 2. ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP REALITY CHECK • In 2003-04, NCAA institutions gave athletic scholarships amounting to 2% of the 6.4 million high school/youth athletes. • Average NCAA scholarship not including football & basketball is $8,707.00/year. • Average baseball or track & field scholarship is $2000.00/year. • Scholarships must be renewed each year. They are not guaranteed year to year. • Tuition, room & board for NCAA institutions cost between $20,000- $50,000 per year. (The New York Times, March 10, 2008) 09/16/13
  3. 3. Student-Athletes Men's Basketball Women's Basketball Football Baseball Men's Ice Hockey Men's Soccer High School Student Athletes 540,207 439,550 1,109,278 472,644 36,475 391,839 High School Senior Student Athletes 154,345 125,586 316,937 135,041 10,421 111,954 NCAA Student Athletes 17,008 15,423 66,313 30,365 3,945 21,770 NCAA Freshman Roster Positions 4,859 4,407 18,947 8,676 1,127 6,220 NCAA Senior Student Athletes 3,780 3,427 14,736 6,748 877 4,838 NCAA Student Athletes Drafted 44 32 250 600 33 76 Percent High School to NCAA 3.1% 3.5% 6.0% 6.4% 10.8% 5.6% Percent NCAA to Professional 1.2% 0.9% 1.7% 8.9% 3.8% 1.6% Percent High School to Professional 0.03% 0.03% 0.08% 0.44% 0.32% 0.07% NCAA: National Collegiate Athletic Association Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level 09/16/13 JT 11/11
  4. 4. THAT SAID… 09/16/13
  5. 5. THE EXPERIENCE OF 09/16/13
  6. 6. COLLEGE ATHLETICS 09/16/13
  7. 7. LASTS A 09/16/13
  8. 8. LIFETIME!! 09/16/13
  9. 9. NCAA: Which division is my best athletic fit? • The National Collegiate Athletic Association is a voluntary association of 1281 institutions who make and monitor rules regarding eligibility, recruiting, amateurism, financial aid, etc. (www.ncaa.org) • Division I • Division II • Division III 09/16/13
  10. 10. DI Oregon Football… is it the right fit for me? No. Name Ht. Wt. Position 47   Alonso, Kiko 6-4 222 LB   85 Anderson, Anthony 6-5 233 DE 78   Armstrong, Karrington 6-2 283 OL 79   Asper, Mark 6-7 322 OL 51   Ava, Isaac 5-10 251 LB 24   Barner, Kenjon 5-11 180 RB 31   Bassett, Kenny 5-9 175 RB 93   Beard, Rob 6-0 218 PK 3   Bennett, Bryan 6-2 183 QB 71   Benyard, Everett 6-7 315 OL
  11. 11. Stanford Women’s Volleyball Height matters! • No. Name Height Position Yr • 1 Lydia Bai 6-2 Outside Hitter FR • 2 Carly Wopat 6-2 Middle Blocker FR • 7 Jessica Walker 6-1 Middle Blocker SO • 10 Alix Klineman 6-4 Outside Hitter SR • 11 Charlotte Brown 6-5 Middle Blocker FR • 12 Stephanie Browne 6-4 Middle Blocker JR • 21 Hayley Spelman 6-6 Outside Hitter SO
  12. 12. Do I match up? DI UCLA Men’s Water Polo No. Name Ht. Wt. Position Year 15 Grant Zider 6-4 215 Center/RS SO 13 James Palmer 6-5 205 Attacker/RS SO 2 Ted Peck 6-6 230 Center SR 3 Chris Pulido 6-6 190 Defender SO 6 Brad Greiner 6-6 195 Ctr Defender SO 16 Tim Cherry 6-6 220 Ctr Defender FR 14 Logan Powell 6-4 194 Attacker/RS SO
  13. 13. Division I • The most expensive, competitive, and time consuming division of the NCAA • 351 institutions • Big athletic department budgets • Sizable athletic facilities • Increased scholarship money available (ex. DI Football is allowed a maximum of 85 full scholarships) • Toughest eligibility requirements: graduate high school with 16 core courses and test score/GPA determined on a sliding scale. • Local examples: CAL, Stanford, USF, Santa Clara, St. Mary’s, UC Davis, SJSU, Pacific, Sac. St., and Cal Poly. 09/16/13
  14. 14. Division II • Intermediate level as an alternative to the highly competitive DI and the non-scholarship DIII. • 308 full or provisional members • Smaller public schools and many private colleges that often draw more locally and play closer to home. • More limited scholarship opportunities and more partial scholarships that vary from school to school (ex. DII football is allowed 36 scholarships). • Eligibility requirements: graduate high school with 16 core courses, earn a minimum 2.0 GPA, and a combined 820 SAT or sum 68 ACT. • Local Examples: SFSU, East Bay, Chico, Humboldt, Sonoma, Monterey, Dominican, and Notre Dame de Namur • Others: UC San Diego, Colorado Springs, WWU09/16/13
  15. 15. Division III • Largest of the three divisions with 444 member institutions that range in size from 500-10,000 students. • Colleges & schools choosing not to offer athletic scholarships. No redshirting athletes. • Small class sizes, regional season play, and the opportunity to play more than one sport in college. • Each campus determines their own eligibility requirements. • Local examples: Menlo, Mills & UC Santa Cruz • Others: Tufts, Middlebury, Williams, Amherst09/16/13
  16. 16. NAIA • National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics seeks to fully integrate life, academics, sport and fitness into the higher education environment. • 300 colleges & universities in the US & Canada (College of Bahamas) • More relaxed rules, especially related to transferring • Athletic scholarships • Eligibility Center (2010) • 23 National Championships in 13 sports • 50,000 student athletes • Eligibility requirements. Meet two of the three: 18 ACT/860 SAT, 2.0 GPA, or graduate in the top half of class • Local examples: Maritime, Fresno Pacific, Holy Names, Patten, and William Jessup • Others: UC Merced, Southern Oregon, Evergreen • Options: community college, club, intramurals, PG 09/16/13
  17. 17. BLUE CHIP ATHLETES Who are they? Indicators? • Highly valued & recruited athlete. • College coaches will make contact with these athletes early (soph year) through club coaches. • “You’ve got mail” = September 1st of junior year • Phone call July 1st of senior year. • Paid official visit invitations for senior year. • Home visits from coaches senior year. • Coaches visit high schools with principals permission. • Coaches attend their tournaments and sometimes even high school games. • Coaches spam, call, email, these recruits, their families, and their coaches as often as the NCAA permits (and then some). • Blue Chips tend to “commit” to colleges early in the process. 09/16/13
  18. 18. Blue Chips! 09/16/13 JT 11/11
  19. 19. WHITE CHIPS… MUST MARKET THEMSELVES • Keep your grades up so you have more options. • Create a resume/profile with brief athletic, academic & personal information • Create a cover email letter • Register for the NCAA Eligibility Center (by junior year) • Get to know the NCAA website/understand the recruiting rules specific to your sport. • Talk to high school coaches/club coaches, trainers, and camp/showcase coaches to determine best athletic fit. • Search NCAA “Who We Are” to determine which colleges have which sport and division. • Create a big list and MAKE CONTACT!! Email resume/cover letter!! 09/16/13
  20. 20. Sample Athlete Resume 09/16/13 JT 11/11
  21. 21. Sample Cover Letter Email • Dear Coach __________, •   • My name is ___________, and I will graduate in (2014). I am a (year in school) at ____________ High School in California with a ____ grade point average. I currently play for the ______________ club (you can add more info here to highlight your club team). As well as continuing my education, I would like to play soccer at the (DI, DII, DII, NAIA) collegiate level. •   • School specifics here. (I’m interested in your ‘college’ because of... stuff…make this specific but not too long. Put in something specific about the school or program, a friend that speaks highly of it, or if you know the coach mention it, or simply congratulate them on a good season or recent win). •   • While I understand that NCAA rules do not allow you to contact me by phone until July 1 before my senior year (this is for DI & DII schools, not DIIIs) or by mail on September 1st of my junior year, I am attaching a resume of my personal, athletic, and academic information. This link will take you to a short video of me in action _____________________ (optional). My coaches contact information is ______________________________ (name, email and phone if you are a sophomore so they know who to contact). •   • I am interested in, and looking forward to, learning more about ‘school’ and the ‘mascot’ (soccer/softball/LAX). I would appreciate receiving information about your upcoming ID and summer camps. •   • Sincerely, •   •   • Your Name 09/16/13 JT 11/11
  22. 22. WHITE CHIPS After initial contact must: • Track responses & non responses equally. • Fill out athlete questionnaires on websites. • Make a highlight video and send the link. • Stay in contact with coaches (send tournament updates early). • Visit campuses. Attend games/matches/meets to show interest and determine fit. If possible, watch practices & attend class. • Attend ID Camps, summer camps, prospect camps, invitational camps, tourneys and combines (ask for feedback). • Learn from the veteran parents/athletes in your sport who have been there, and are now wearing the sweatshirt!!! 09/16/13
  23. 23. Blue Chip or White Chip? 09/16/13 JT 11/11
  24. 24. NCAA RULES http://www.ncaa.org 09/16/13 SEE THE NCAA WEBSITE REGARDING RULES, COMPLIANCE, RECRUTING, ELIGIBILITY AND AMATURISM AS THEY DIFFER GREATLY BY DIVISION AND SPORT.
  25. 25. TOP 10 COACHES PET PEEVES 1. Parents send emails instead of athlete. 2. Parents call instead of athlete. 3. Parents call and ask us to call them back when it’s against the NCAA recruiting rules. 4. Use of recruiting services. 5. “Game playing” in the process. 6. Sending hours of video or testimonial. 7. Trying to engage us in conversation at tournaments when it’s illegal. 8. Not taking “no” for an honest answer. 9. Sending information on their high school athletics only. 10. The myth that everyone gets a full ride or a scholarship. (Information polled from CAL assistant coaches in all sports) 09/16/13
  26. 26. ADVICE TO ATHLETES DON’T! Believe everything you hear about scholarships. Verbally commit without a read from the admissions office. Put all of your eggs in one basket. DO! Keep grades up! Cast a big net and stay in contact with many coaches. Have strong back ups. Meet deadlines for transcripts/test scores/transcript release form Go to your counselor for advice about academic/social fit. Start earlier & work harder at the process than non-athletes. Use the NCAA website, “Who We Are”. Buy the book - The Academic Athlete by Dickson/Laughrea. 09/16/13
  27. 27. Jennifer “JT” Thomas, Maybeck High School College Counselor jt.thomas11@yahoo.com 09/16/13

×