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Tips for aspiring authors and Meet the journal editors

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Tips for aspiring authors and Meet the journal editors

  1. 1. Writing for Publication: tips for aspiring authors Angharad Roberts and Jane Secker Editors: Library and Information Research & Journal of Information Literacy CILIP IL Group and LIRG
  2. 2. We plan to look at • Where and what to publish • The peer review process • How your paper will be assessed • The publication process • Writing tips • Writing in the Journal of Information Literacy and Library and Information Research
  3. 3. Where to publish? • Why publish in an academic journal? • What is your story? Who is your audience? • Read the author guidelines of journals • Is your topic within scope of the journal? • E.g. JIL focuses on information literacy NOT library skills, libraries or teaching in general • Library and Information Research has a clear focus on research into practice in information and library services • Peer-reviewed article? Shorter project report? • Read previously published articles in a journal
  4. 4. What to publish? • What stage are you at with your research? Could you publish something based on your literature review, findings from a pilot project, final project conclusions? • Writing by yourself or with a co-author? • Consider writing conference reports, book reviews... • ...or joining an Editorial team!
  5. 5. Articles for peer review: • Need to be original – are you just telling a familiar story? • Refer to the literature and place the work within a wider context • Evidence any claims made • Follow academic convention in structure of the paper • Have been carefully proof-read before submission, especially if English is not your first language • Are anonymised for peer review
  6. 6. Activity Turning a short report a into peer-review articles
  7. 7. JIL reviewers’ criteria • Relevance to JIL – within our scope? • Originality and interest to our audience – useful contribution to knowledge or good practice? • Title and abstract – appropriate wording and length and informative? • Methodology – appropriate? • Use of literature and referencing – good analysis of literature? Good referencing or signs of plagiarism? • Clarity of expression and structure – clear exposition of argument? Logical structure? Spell out acronyms, avoid jargon!
  8. 8. LIR reviewers’ criteria • Initial editorial review – within the scope of the journal? • Non-peer reviewed articles – more detailed editorial evaluation. • Free-text peer reviews covering: • Suitability for the journal • Originality / interest to audience • Clarity • Length • Relevance to / implications for LIS practice
  9. 9. Peer reviewers recommend:  Accept for publication without amendment (almost never!)  Revisions required  Major revisions required followed by peer review  Resubmit elsewhere  Decline submission
  10. 10. What to do with reviewer comments  Make a list of all the actions needed of you. Can you address them? If so, how?  If you can’t, discuss this with the editors –say why (can take your article elsewhere!)  Revise the paper and resubmit it, with a covering letter detailing how you have addressed each comment  If there were comments you didn’t implement, because you couldn’t or because you disagreed with them, note them and say why (you may want to discuss with us earlier in revision process)  Remember that addressing these comments may unearth other suggested changes – several rounds of revisions may be required
  11. 11. Copyeditors’ advice  Use the required template  This also means  Use the right font and size eg Arial 11pt for body text in JIL (if using the template, this should be default)  Number all section headings using the multilevel list option  Format headings as per the style sheet  Format your references using the journal’s required style  For JIL that means the Harvard style as used by Cardiff University  Remember to convert your EndNote references to text  Ensure all in-text citations are given a full reference at the end, and that all references are cited in the text
  12. 12. Copyeditors’ advice [2]  Define all acronyms and abbreviations at first use  Ensure all diagrams and images are copyright free and acknowledge their source  And specifically for JIL:  Use British spellings  Avoid footnotes – either incorporate information into the text or list non-cited information and websites under Resources and cited sources under References  List author name, affiliation and email address for each author, in the order given in the metadata, on the article loaded for copyediting
  13. 13. Once it is published  Celebrate!  Let everyone know  Link using the DOI  Add it to your repository, acknowledging where published
  14. 14. Tips for aspiring authors • Keep focused. Pin your central hypothesis or question by your desk and make sure that everything you write is directed towards supporting and answering that question • Don’t worry about starting in the middle! Write up the section which comes most naturally and work out from there • Practise (and reflect on) what you teach - finding the key research, synthesising the literature, citing and referencing
  15. 15. Tips for aspiring authors [2] • Find your place and space to think and write • Break it down…. it’s like how you eat an elephant • Present your ideas early and let them grow • Writing is an iterative process, draft, redraft, draft again • Find a good proof reader – a colleague, friend, family member, but always get someone else to read it through! • Become a peer reviewer, or a book reviews writer, but learn to read critically to help you write critically
  16. 16. Activity [2] Think about your next steps towards getting published. List up to 3 ideas about how you could follow up from this session and discuss in groups.
  17. 17. Further resources • Gordon, Rachel Singer. 2004. The Librarian's Guide to Writing for Publication. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press. • HEA-ICS. 2007. Writing for publication http://www.ics.heacademy.ac.uk/events/displayevent.ph p?id=187 • JIL Author Guidelines. http://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL/about/submission s#authorGuidelines • LIR Author Guidelines: http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/docs/lir-author-guidelines. doc • Nicholson, S. 2006. Writing your first scholarly article: a guide for budding authors in librarianship. Information Technology and Libraries 25(2) 108-111. Available at: http://bibliomining.com/nicholson/firstarticle.htm
  18. 18. Further resources…. • Eve J (2008) Writing a research proposal: planning and communicating your research ideas effectively, Library and Information Research, 32(102): 18-28 • Hall GM (1998) How to write a paper, London, BMJ Books • Hinchcliffe LJ and Dorner J (eds) (2003) How to get published in LIS Journals: a practical guide, Library Connect, pamphlet 2 • Huth EJ (1990) How to write and publish papers in the medical sciences, Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins • Murray R (2005) Writing for academic journals, Maidenhead: Open University Press
  19. 19. Meet the Journal Editors Journal of Information Literacy, Jane Secker Library and Information Research, Angharad Roberts Innovative Practice in Higher Education, Geoff Walton New Review of Academic Librarianship, Graham Walton Evidence based Library and Information Practice, Alison Brettle
  20. 20. Journal of Information Literacy JIL is an international, peer- reviewed journal that aims to investigate information literacy in all its forms to address the interests of diverse IL communities of practice. To this end it publishes articles from both established and new authors in this field. JIL welcomes contributions that push the boundaries of IL beyond the educational setting and examine this phenomenon as a continuum between those involved in its development and delivery and those benefiting from its provision. 2 issues per year (June and December) - no author processing charges
  21. 21. Library and Information Research Research Into Practice in Information and Library Services. Journal of the CILIP special interest group LIRG: www.lirgjournal.org.uk LIR’s objectives include: - To publish research in such a way that it is accessible to, and usable by, the LIS community; - To encourage reporting of research by practitioners; - To encourage reflective and evidence-based practice; - To publish papers resulting from LIRG annual awards and prizes; - To promote the use and understanding of quality research methods. Open Access – no processing charges. 3 issues per year, including 1 special issue each year. Digitised archive from 1993 onwards.
  22. 22. Innovative Practice in Higher Education • Independent online journal (kindly hosted at Staffordshire University) - an opportunity for colleagues in HE to share their work on innovation in teaching and learning • Double blind peer reviewed publication http://journals.staffs.ac.uk/index.php/ipihe • One publication per year since 2011 • Joint managing editors: • Chris Wakeman (University of Wolverhampton) • Geoff Walton (Northumbria University) • Topics include: tutoring, research, equality and diversity, internationalisation, classroom innovation, widening participation, assessment and feedback, research-informed teaching, information and digital literacy, teaching and learning processes • Accepts long papers (up to 5,000), short papers and posters with audio
  23. 23. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice • EBLIP is an international open access, peer reviewed journal, published quarterly, hosted by the University of Alberta Learning Services, • The purpose of the journal is to provide a forum for librarians and other information professionals to discover research that may contribute to decision making in professional practice. • EBLIP publishes original research and commentary on the topic of evidence based library and information practice, as well as reviews of previously published research (evidence summaries) on a wide number of topics to help LIS practitioners use research in their practice • http://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/EBLIP/index
  24. 24. Publishes reviews, research, critiques and exemplar case studies on substantive topics relevant to those providing library and information services to academic communities. Emphasis is placed on establishing the relevance and applicability of theory and/or research for the academic library practitioner. The intention is to disseminate developments and encourage discussion on the future role of academic libraries and their services British Journal of Academic Librarianship : 1986 – 1994 (204 papers) New Review of Academic Librarianship: 1995 – http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/racl20/current • 406 papers as at summer 2014 • Three issues per year • 2014 themed issue on ‘Special Collections in a Digital Age’ with Guest Editors Margaret Haines and Wayne Jones (Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada) • Double blind peer review
  25. 25. Thank you!

Notes de l'éditeur

  • Jane
  • Jane
  • Jane
  • Jane
  • Jane

    At this point we gave out a short article and asked people to work in groups to think about how it could be turned into a peer reviewed article. We also gave them our peer review form
  • Jane
  • Angharad
  • Angharad
  • Angharad
  • Angharad
  • Angharad
  • Angharad
  • Angharad and Jane
  • Angharad and Jane
  • Angharad

    What are your next steps towards getting published? List up to 3 things you would like to do to follow up from this session. This might include an idea for an article title based on a current research project or a different type of article which you would like to try writing (eg a book review or workshop report – perhaps about today’s sessions!).
    Discuss your next steps with your group.
  • Angharad
  • Geoff

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