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Building connected cultures. Why, what & how.

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Building connected cultures. Why, what & how.

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A talk delivered at The Enterprise Digital Summit in November 2016.
• How the changing world is affecting organisations
• What I mean by a ‘connected culture’
• A brief case study

A talk delivered at The Enterprise Digital Summit in November 2016.
• How the changing world is affecting organisations
• What I mean by a ‘connected culture’
• A brief case study

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Building connected cultures. Why, what & how.

  1. 1. BUILDING CONNECTED CULTURES E N T E R P R I S E D I G I T A L / 2 4 . 1 1 . 1 6
  2. 2. 3 T H I N G S F O R T O D A Y 1.  How the changing world is affecting organisations 2.  What I mean by a ‘connected culture’ 3.  A brief case study
  3. 3. F I R S T T H I N G S F I R S T •  Pair up - the person nearest the door is the artist, the other person is the model •  Artists - draw a portrait of your model while asking them these questions: •  When did you last lie, and why? •  In what ways might you be difficult to work with? •  Is there an art to loading the dishwasher? •  Models - answer the questions as authentically as you can. •  Tweet me your pics @jennilloyd
  4. 4. We are all just people
  5. 5. VUCA
  6. 6. Volatile Uncertain Complex Ambiguous
  7. 7. The hierarchies of yesterday are no match for the speed required of today
  8. 8. Profit Hierarchies Controlling Planning Privacy Purpose Networks Empowering Experimentation Transparency PAST: PREDICTABLE FUTURE FIT: ADAPTABLE VIA RESPONSIVE.ORG
  9. 9. Welcome to the new Normal
  10. 10. Tools support behaviour, they don’t create it
  11. 11. Collaborative behaviour is dependent on the alignment of culture, leadership & strategy strategy culture leadershipbehaviour I T ’ S A B O U T B E H A V I O U R N O T T E C H N O L O G Y
  12. 12. COLLABORATION COOPERATION CONNECTION CONVERSATION Become visible & participate Find & discover people, relate & connect Share what you know, have & think Work together towards shared goals SOCIALCOHESION THANKS TO EPHRAIM FREED / THOUGHTFARMER BLOG
  13. 13. Two or more people working together towards shared goals C O L L A B O R A T I O N I S … THANKS TO EPHRAIM FREED / THOUGHTFARMER BLOG
  14. 14. A T T R I B U T E S O F C O L L A B O R A T I O N Two or more people (team) Working together (processes) Towards shared goals (purpose) THANKS TO EPHRAIM FREED / THOUGHTFARMER BLOG
  15. 15. If people are working together but have no shared goals, they are cooperating, rather than collaborating. Cooperation is more lightweight than collaboration with less focused goals. Cooperation can help create social cohesion, which has positive benefits for the company community and can set the conditions that lead to collaboration. C O L L A B O R A T I O N V S . C O O P E R A T I O N
  16. 16. A major transport provider, serving millions of passengers daily. Strategic imperative to connect their people to each other, to information and to customers The digital communications team tasked to roll out a suite of new internal tools First step was to understand how connected their current culture is – what works and what’s in the way. A C A S E S T U D Y
  17. 17. M A P P I N G T H E J O U R N E Y Separate Departments working in silos, pursuing own goals with little collaboration. Many stakeholders, with seemingly conflicting interests Coexisting Departments coexist, working alongside each other in acknowledgement of common goals, but with little collaboration across teams Cooperating Departments help each other towards shared goals, but maintain their separate identities Collaborative Boundaries between departments are porous, groups collaborate flexibly to deliver agile, fast solutions Connected All teams work together effectively every day, wherever they are based, to make all customers’ journeys matter 1 2 3 4 5
  18. 18. Awareness Engagement Empowerment Resources Skills Business integration 6 D I M E N S I O N S O F A C O N N E C T E D C U L T U R E
  19. 19. T H E C O N N E C T E D C U L T U R E M O D E L RESOURCES 5 53 311 A W A R E N E S S 24 2 40 I N T E G R A T I O N
  20. 20. •  We invited different groups from diverse parts of the business to share their experiences at short workshop sessions •  We asked them to tell us about when they have felt most and least connected to their colleagues and the organisation •  We asked them to assess themselves against the Connected model and give a score on each dimension •  We listened to and collected their stories and suggestions W H A T D I D W E D O ?
  21. 21. H O W C O N N E C T E D D O W E F E E L ? 5 53 311 Awareness Businessintegration 24 2 40
  22. 22. Awareness: Group have low awareness in general and want more communication from management and training. Engagement: Highly engaged but would like to be more involved – to be able to send information as well as receive it so can be part of conversation. Empowerment: Policies and procedures stop group from trying new things; they feel hampered by management. Restrictions lead to hacks & workarounds. Resources: RPIs feel restricted by number of devices they carry, limitations of those devices, permissions around apps & working practice. Inconsistent understanding of available apps and permitted practices leading to concern over safety (want to be able to group message). Skills: Training very limited and ‘one size fits all’. Want more regular, better tailored training, not just on software but devices too. Business integration: Can see benefit for customers but many use their own devices to access information as they have better apps and are quicker. W H A T D O T H E S T O R I E S T E L L U S ?
  23. 23. 1.  This VUCA’d world needs responsive organisations 2.  Tools support behaviour, they don’t create it 3.  Everyone is a node in the network – their experience matters T A K E A W A Y S
  24. 24. One person can make a difference. And it may as well be you. B O N U S S L I D E
  25. 25. Any questions? AMA @jennilloyd Thank you!
  26. 26. A N E X P E R I M E N T I N H O W I W O R K & L I V E .

Notes de l'éditeur

  • Hello. Don’t you all look lovely?!
    I’m Jenni Lloyd. My background is in design - but I view it as a mindset that can be applied to any situation, rather than purely a visual thing. I believe that business can and should be a force for positive change in the world - and that people connected together with a meaningful purpose can make anything happen.
    I'm going to talk through my ideas about and experiences of building connected cultures - what that means, why it's necessary and how you might go about it.
  • But first, let’s play a game. Form a pair with the person next to you. The person nearest the door is the artist, the other person is the model. I’m going to assume you have access to paper and a pen - if not - borrow or improvise.
    Artists - draw a portrait of your model while asking them these questions:
    When did you last lie, and why?
    In what ways might you be difficult to work with?
    Is there an art to loading the dishwasher?
    Models - answer the questions as authentically as you can.
    You have 2 minutes!
    Tweet me your pics if you can @jennilloyd
  • So, that was fun - but what was the point?
    It’s easy to forget at work that we’re all just human. With all the hopes, dreams, strengths and frailties that that brings. The way we’ve structured our organisations often fails to accommodate our humanity. The more we connect, the more we trust each other and that makes us feel happier and safer.
    And isn’t that partly why we come along to things like this?
    So let’s make time today to truly look at each other and listen actively to what’s being said (and left unsaid) by the people we’re with.
  • Hands up who’s familiar with this acronym…
    For those who aren’t,  it stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous.
  • For those who aren’t it stands for Volatile, Uncertain, Complex & Ambiguous.
    It’s use can be traced back to the American Military’s response to the new conditions of warfare post Cold War, particularly as they started to face new kinds of terrorist threat. Now been adopted by business community to describe our chaotic, turbulent, and rapidly changing business environment.
    We’ve only got to look at current events to see these conditions writ large — and look at the high street and financial papers to understand how it’s translating into business. Black swans are popping up all over the place!
  • We’re living through an era of change - maybe even a change of eras (but that’s a whole ‘nother talk…). And a major factor in all of this is technology - in particular the impact of the internet on everything to do with how we live our lives.
    Hierarchy fails in the digital age not because it is illegitimate, but because it is slow and the world has become fast.
  • Technology is forcing change on all the institutions that support the way we live
    Big firms are learning that they need to network their organizations in order to stay competitive against the onslaught of nimble startups.
    The organisations that will survive and thrive are those that are organised for adaptability – and are digital by default.
  • Responsive org manifesto
    “The tension between organizations optimized for predictability and the unpredictable world they inhabit has reached a breaking point.
    We need a new way.
    Future fit orgs will be built to learn and respond rapidly through the open flow of information; encouraging experimentation and learning on rapid cycles; and organizing as a network of employees, customers, and partners motivated by shared purpose.”
  • We’ve crossed into a new ‘Normal’ :
    - the advent of the internet has challenged - and overcome - established business models (from shopping to shipping)
    - its enabled new agile competitors to emerge - with flexible, distributed, engaged workforces.
    - its introduced a new ethos based on community, trust and hyper-connectivity - open source, crowd-funding, businesses that create platforms for others
    In the last decade, we’ve seen a revolution in technology. It’s become intelligent, adaptive and scalable.
    Now we need to see the same from our organizations.
  • So that’s the macro stuff – some of the context in why we’re trying to advance our organisations in different ways. I’m assuming that most of us are here because we’re busy working out how to become future fit.
    In my work, a common belief seems to be that technology itself can provide the answer. Many internal comms, IT or HR teams have been tasked to implement an enterprise social network in the belief that the ability for the organisation to network online will create a networked organisation. One that will reap the benefits of hyperconnectivity through increased collaboration and innovation.
    I don’t believe this to be true.
  • Introducing collaboration tools will not create effective and sustained collaborative behaviour. Connective software, won’t create a connected culture.
  • I believe that it’s really about changing human behaviour.
    The behaviours most commonly associated with my digital transformation projects are collaboration and innovation.
    Whatever the desired outcome then the focus must be on aligning culture, leadership & strategy to enable and support the desired behaviour.
    Leadership: Creating a vision and direction for the organization and mobilizing people to accomplish them, while upholding the company values.
    Strategy: Establishing the fundamental focus for action that the organization must take in order to provide significant added value to customers.
    Culture: How we do things around here
    Today, I’m focusing on culture - because I agree with the adage that culture eats everything else for breakfast. And I’m going to talk specifically about collaboration and connectedness.
  • In my experience collaboration is hard. It’s hard to work together with people you don’t know, who might have different goals, incentives, working patterns and values. It’s very hard to start collaborating just because you’ve been told to.
    Collaboration can be formally engineered but will only happen organically if certain cultural conditions are in place.
    This model starts to explore what those conditions might be and how they link together. I’ve developed it based on some excellent work by Ephraim Freed and have been testing it in my last few projects – some based in organisations and some in the community.
    I like to think of this as a ladder – the first rung is simple – starting a conversation sounds low value but it’s the building block for community. It helps people step in and make themselves known. From there they can form connections with others – finding other people with common interests, shared experiences. A group of people who know a bit about each other, with easy, informal relationships, shared values and goals can then very easily start helping each other by sharing what they know, what they have. These are the conditions that enable groups to come together and work towards shared goals. New communities might need a bit of help with all this – someone to host conversations, make introductions, introduce topics of interest. And in the community it helps to have a space in which to hold events that can accelerate this kind of activity.
  • Like innovation, collaboration is one of those words that gets used so often in so many different contexts that it’s worth just slowing down for a minute and thinking about what it means.
    http://www.thoughtfarmer.com/blog/what-collaboration-really-means/
  • http://www.thoughtfarmer.com/blog/what-collaboration-really-means/
  • http://www.thoughtfarmer.com/blog/what-collaboration-really-means/
  • Time for a bit of detail – I’d like to share with you a project I finished last year, in which we started to explore how to create the building blocks of that ladder model in practice in a massive, complex, very established business. Although they responsible for running a transport network they’re the antithesis of a networked organisation, being very much based in a hierarchical, command and control tradition. Which given the age of the org and its safety imperative is no surprise.
    The client was …
  • But what does ‘Connected’ mean in this context?
    How can we break it down into a set of attributes we can start exploring in a meaningful way?
    We started by forming a steering group representing the different parts of the business and spent some time workshopping different ideas. After a few iterations we ended up identifying six components to ‘connectedness’ within the context of this company. We were aware that we’d be taking these components into workshops with lots of different people so devised a series of questions to help give some context to the words.
    Awareness: how well do you understand the benefit of more connected ways of working? Are you aware of the full range of opportunities? Do you know how other organisations are gaining advantage?
    Engagement: to what degree do you want to change the way you work to a more connected approach? Are you interested and willing to make the time to change the way you do things?
    Empowerment: how well able are you to benefit from new ways of working? Do you dare to speak up? Are you willing and able to take responsibility? Do you have permission?
    Resources: to what degree is the right infrastructure in place? Do you have (access to) the necessary tools and processes?
    Skills: to what degree do you possess the necessary skills? Are you able to work in new ways?
    Business integration: to what degree are connected ways of working embedded in business operations? Do they transform the relationship between employees, partners and customers and make every journey matter?
  • We created a map of the characteristics, so that we had some way of taking the model into workshops – and of representing the results later on.
    The idea was to get diverse groups to score themselves against the model so we could compare the different experiences and needs and plan a solution that would accommodate huge differences.
  • What you see here
    The people in fleeces
  • Everybody in the group is given a number of dot stickers
    The model is drawn on the wall
    People gather around and respond to the questions by sticking their dots on the scale
    After we gather around and discuss what patterns we see and what we can learn. It starts a conversation, people form connections – and we establish a benchmark for this group so we can see how we can change it over time.
    This group have a lot of will to get involved but feel like they’re not ‘allowed’. They also lack the resources they need. They’re generally clear on how being better connected to the rest of the business would enable them to do their jobs better and be beneficial for customers.
  • The macro VUCA conditions provide us with great opportunities as well as challenges. We can take this as a chance to change the way our organisations work, to change the way we work inside - or outside - of those organisations and that can help us reconnect to the places we live in ways that makes us happier and our communities healthier.
    We are the system - the system of our community emerges from the choices we take & the relationships we choose to operate from.
  • thepurposelab.uk
  • I’m going to tell you a bit about my journey
    My working life began in 1991. I remember getting my first email account and not knowing how it worked. I remember my first mobile phone. But technology has had a massive impact on my life – from starting out as an interaction designer to helping organisations transform themselves in the face of digital disruption. In 2014 NixonMcInnes, the consultancy I worked for for 9 years went through its own radical transformation. In response I decided to give myself a year to experiment with how I work. I realised I’d become disillusioned with the work I was doing – that it wasn’t helping me make the changes I wanted to see in the world. I knew I wanted to use my experience in a different field but I wasn’t sure what that was. So I set up PurposeLab and used Otto Scharmer’s Theory U as a framework to explore and experiment to find the work that has most meaning to me.
    I ended up creating a set of prototypes that have now evolved into a new practice. Still based in participative design and problem solving, but operating in an entirely new field. To do this I had to rework my relationship to money – I realised that what I earnt represented seniority, status and progression. But that outside of a company I no longer needed any confirmation of that. So I worked out what income my family really needed and set that as my base level. So long as I make that, I’m OK.
    I also gave myself some rules for my experiment:
    I won’t make any decisions based purely on money
    I will use my values to make decisions
    I won’t work alone
    I will live this ‘out loud’ and openly share what I’m doing and what I’m learning

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