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Film literacy in a contemporary landscape

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Keynote talk at Bradford International Film Education Symposium 25th Mach 2019

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Film literacy in a contemporary landscape

  1. 1. Film literacy in a contemporary landscape IMAGINATION, CREATIVITY, AND THE MOVING IMAGE Mark Reid, BFI Education Bradford Film Education Symposium 25th March 2019
  2. 2. PRINT VS FILM • Symbolic (nothing like the things it represents) • Pick it up and put it down • Time • Sound • Images • Speech, music, gesture • Indexical (looks like the thing it represents)
  3. 3. To be literate is to participate fully in a culture To participate fully in 21C culture, we have to be literate in the moving image It is vital and obvious that understanding, manipulating, and appreciating the film sentence should be an accepted part of the education system Anthony Minghella FILM, MEDIA, OR LITERACY? Film and media are part of literacy
  4. 4. Choose and access Understand and analyse Create and express Challenge PARTICIPATE About Literacy…
  5. 5. LEV MANOVICH SOFTWARE TAKES COMMAND
  6. 6. MEDIA, OR MODE? MEDIA
  7. 7. MEDIA, OR MODE? MODE
  8. 8. ‘the moving image is the richest, most complex artform and medium of expression human beings have ever invented, and it’s the first one that we learn on our own.’ Cary Bazalgette
  9. 9. UK CONTEXT ENGLAND SCOTLAND NORTHERN IRELAND • Post-14 film and media (8% of cohort) • No moving image in mandatory curriculum since 2013 • Some film in language teaching WALES… • Revising its curriculum for 2021 • Moving image in definition of literacy • "... the set of skills which allows an individual to engage fully in society and in learning, through the different forms of language, and the range of texts, which society values and finds useful." • Moving image embedded in ICT, literacy, History • Dedicated creative Moving Image Arts qual for 14-19 • Extensive support structures – Creative Learning Centres, websites • Inspected formally by govt inspection agency • Investment in cultural education post ‘Troubles’.
  10. 10. NI CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK
  11. 11. LITERACY IN SCOTLAND "… the set of skills which allow an individual to engage fully in society and in learning, through the different forms of language, and the range of texts, which society values and finds useful." CURRICULUM FOR EXCELLENCE
  12. 12. LITERACY IN ENGLAND The overarching aim for English in the national curriculum is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. Dept for Education Programmes of Study for English KS2 (7-11)
  13. 13. LITERACY IN ENGLAND The overarching aim for English in the national curriculum is to promote high standards of language and literacy by equipping pupils with a strong command of the spoken and written word, and to develop their love of literature through widespread reading for enjoyment. Dept for Education Programmes of Study for English KS2 (7-11)
  14. 14. THE STORY SO FAR..
  15. 15. WHAT DO THE WORLD’S EMPLOYERS WANT?
  16. 16. Elliot Eisner Arts and the Creation of Mind, 2002
  17. 17. Rationales for Art Education • Discipline-based: making skills, connoisseurship, and art historical knowledge; • Wider visual culture, to counter bias and ideology; • Creative problem-solving, (Bauhaus model); • Creative self-expression; • Preparation for work in arts and arts-related spheres; • Promoting wider academic performance; • Cross-curricula practice, supporting and enhancing non-arts subjects; • To develop cognition, to “foster flexibility, promote a tolerance for ambiguity, encourage risk taking, [and develop] the exercise of judgement outside the sphere of rules.” after Eisner, 2002
  18. 18. FILM, ART AND COGNITION The arts enable specific, unique types of thinking: Flexible purposing Judgement without rules Using material as medium Seeing world aesthetically Exercising the imagination Visualising concepts
  19. 19. Eisner’s cognitive skills • Flexible purposing • Judgement without rules • Aesthetic seeing • Exercising imagination • Transforming material into medium • Visualising concepts WEF skills for 21C • Complex problem solving • Critical thinking • Creativity • Making Judgements • Cognitive flexibility AND • Emotional intelligence • Co-ordinating with others
  20. 20. Film a situation between two or more characters linked to an emotion - a romantic encounter / envy / jealousy /shame. Repeat the exact same situation, but change the space where this encounter takes place, and change the manner in which you film it. Maximum 2 mins per situation - 4 mins in total.
  21. 21. from le Cinema cent ans de Jeunesse https://markreid1895.wordpress.com/2019/03/20/mid-term-meeting-in-london/
  22. 22. FILM, ART AND COGNITION The arts enable specific, unique types of thinking: Flexible purposing Judgement without rules Using material as medium Seeing world aesthetically Exercising the imagination Visualising concepts
  23. 23. Consider the implications of the relationship between forms of representation for the selection of content in the school curriculum. Learning to use particular forms of representation is also learning to think and represent meaning in particular ways. How broad is the current distribution? What forms of representation are emphasized? In what forms are students expected to become “literate”? What modes of cognition are stimulated, practiced, and refined by the forms that are made available? Elliot Eisner, Arts and the Creation of Mind, 2002
  24. 24. Consider the implications of the relationship between forms of representation for the selection of content in the school curriculum. Learning to use particular forms of representation is also learning to think and represent meaning in particular ways. How broad is the current distribution? What forms of representation are emphasized? In what forms are students expected to become “literate”? What modes of cognition are stimulated, practiced, and refined by the forms that are made available? Elliot Eisner, Arts and the Creation of Mind, 2002
  25. 25. What if we were to use different forms of representation, different modes and media, in the classroom, enabling children to access different types of intelligence?
  26. 26. A NEW FILM-RICH CURRICULUM Creativity and imagination Cultural breadth Critical thinking Collaboration Problem solving Emotional intelligence Tolerance
  27. 27. Grazie 谢谢 고맙습니다 Dziękuję go raibh maith agat Gracias Благодаря ти ありがとう obrigado Thank you!

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