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Understanding local networks

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Understanding local networks

  1. 1. UNDERSTANDING LOCAL NETWORKS MODULE 2
  2. 2. “No man is an island” “Humans have the need to belong, to be affirmed, and to be appreciated”
  3. 3. WHAT ARE LOCAL NETWORKS? • A relationship between two persons is the most fundamental building block of any society (Eriksen, 2010). • It is necessary to create relationships and not just connections, as “it takes two to tango”. • These relationships create local networks.
  4. 4. • To concretize the discussion of local network, we need to define the different types of relationships that exist within a local network. • To understand the concept of local networks, an individual must first interact with his or her community.
  5. 5. It is said that a network is a person- dependent kind of social system, which is reproduced through our continued interaction with our group (Ericksen, 2010). Hence, no communication network is created without social interaction.
  6. 6. • In examining a local network, we need to look into the kinds of relationships that operate within a given community.  Institutions which influence the formation of an individual’s perception about life, his role in the community and society as well as about the essence of his very existence
  7. 7. THE LOCAL NETWORK AND THE INDIVIDUAL • The local network can be observed in the dynamic sets of relationships in the barangay/community. • The individual performs diverse and overlapping social roles that both meet personal and societal goals.
  8. 8. FUNDS OF KNOWLEDGE • It refers to the body of community knowledge that emerges originally from lives, routines, experiences, practices, and strategies of community people. • It also affirms that relationships matter. • Knowledge has a place of production (Bennagen, 2015)
  9. 9. FOR EXAMPLE • Indigenous knowledge of raising children in the Philippines involves our unique child- caring practices (pagmamano, respect for elders, and performing rituals) tied to our family-oriented value system.
  10. 10. • Achieving inclusive development is the goal of every community. However, contemporary local networks face the knowledge of maintaining its identity while responding to external demands. Powerful social forces such as market, media, education, fashion, and entertainment are susceptible to global trends and changes.
  11. 11. • Through different forms of social media and communication channels, our networks are activated. • New dynamics and patterns of communicating are enhanced and reproduced in order to improve our responses to social issues. • This dynamic of relationship between local networks and larger social networks describes what a network society is.
  12. 12. Two systems in making decisions. STRATEGIC ANALYSIS AND INTUITIVE THINKING
  13. 13. STRATEGIC ANALYSIS • refers to a system or method that requires deliberate, abstract, and effortful thinking that breaks down a complex problem into parts. • deals with abstract problems that are big and complex and require paring down into several components to facilitate focused analysis of the problem.
  14. 14. The Most Common Strategic Analysis Model used in Decision Making
  15. 15. 1. Identify the problem – involves defining the problem and the factors or conditions involved in the situation. 2. Analyze the problem – examining the variables that will change state situation, including the potential challenges and its causes 3. Generate a solution – setting practical, reasonable, and creative criteria and strategies to solve the problem. 4. Implement the solution – execution of the plan 5. Assess and reflect on the outcome – draw lessons that will guide future decisions
  16. 16. INTUITIVE THINKING • this kind of thinking is experiential in nature, meaning, it requires collective experiences and deep knowledge in analyzing and providing a solution to a given problem. • Understanding the social environment allows the person to develop sensitivity, awareness of the surrounding, and pattern recognition – all of which enable an automatic response to like events and occurrences.
  17. 17. • Intuitive thinking is essential in productive thinking but is often neglected in formal settings and daily life. • In local terms, intuitive thinking is described as kutob. • In making immediate decisions, we draw strategies and information from our experiences and life events.
  18. 18. • It is best used when a person is immersed in his or her field of expertise. • When a person has limited experience and knowledge in the area where he or she needs to make a decision, there is a tendency to make mistakes and errors. • When an individual is overfamiliar with his or her own field, he or she may end up ignoring new information that may still be relevant to decision- making.
  19. 19. Comparisons Between Strategic Analysis and Intuitive Thinking
  20. 20. ACTIVITY 2: To be submitted on or before Sept. 23 (Wednesday) • With the 6 different institutions presented, give short description on how you benefit from them. EXAMPLE: Institution: School Benefit: Provided me with education and enabled me to foster friendships.
  21. 21. PLEASE FOLLOW THIS FORMAT: To: g12humanities2@gmail.com Subject: SURNAME, GIVEN NAME, M.I. – GR. & SEC. Compose email: ACTIVITY 2 (Then, type or attach your output)
  22. 22. THANK YOU FOR LISTENING
  23. 23. @tcms2007 @tcms2007 TCMS Thy Covenant Montessori School

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