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Please carefully review your Digital Proof download for formatting,
grammar, and design issues that may need to be correct...
ISBN-13: 978-1517017514
ISBN-10: 1517017513
The materials given here are shared to encourage
the people of China and USA t...
Contents
Introduction
I cried when I heard this radio show
Part 1
Ten Questions
Part 2
Important Quotations and Discussion...
by searching “Dennis Littky NPR, 2005 interview
small school.”
I ordered Littky’s book, the Big Picture. I read his
book. ...
The other frustration is kids are dying daily. They are
dropping out daily. In some cities, 20 percent graduate
high schoo...
In the early 1970s, I was placing student teachers in schools with
“open classrooms.” These schools were influenced by a b...
Schools that are serious about fulfilling every student's promise
must develop structures and relationships that nurture t...
when he had flown there the first time. Together, they toured the
country and learned about the war and its effects on the...
Island, the student is at the workplace of the
mentor for two days in the week.)
6. Learn through real-world, real-work
pr...
Part 1
Ten Questions to Ask
Your Child’s Teacher
Procedures from
a Small School
West Hollywood
Private School
Hollywood, F...
This section of the book
is dedicated to a creative teacher,
Gustavo Fraga.
The logo comes from an incident in a school…
F...
-6. Ask teachers to find apps for the student to
use on their mobile phones.
-7. Ask teachers for their mobile phone
numbe...
1 Ask teachers to put their
lectures on videos. Short lectures
are put on video for the student to view BEFORE
the class. ...
Katie Gimbar explains how she makes videos for
students to watch before they come to class.
TransformTeaching.org 25 WHPSU...
Often the plans are completed with the help of the
parents.
Teachers need training to prepare to work together
to make pro...
This book shows you how to organize school work
on the website. The book was written by Dennis
Yuzenas, Steve McCrea, Omar...
Julie Schell explains the method of “turn to your
neighbor” and “peer instruction.” Students discuss
a question in class.
...
Omar Vasile
gives advice
about how to
organize
projects.
Dennis Yuzenas
describes a project
with National
History Day.
Tra...
A vocabulary app.
TransformTeaching.org 35 WHPSUS.org
A math app.
TransformTeaching.org 36 WHPSUS.org
This video shows students how to review new
words.
TransformTeaching.org 37 WHPSUS.org
7
Ask teachers for their mobile
pho...
8
Ask teachers to look at your
child as an individual. Ask the
teachers to teach your child all four years of high
school....
9
Ask teachers to put the Five
Guiding Questions on the
classroom walls. (From the Big
Picture Schools)
You can get the ex...
Relationships
Am I just another face in the classroom? or do my
teachers know about me and my interests and talents?
Do th...
Authenticity
Is my work just a series of worksheets? Or is the
learning and work I do considered significant outside of
sc...
Bill Gates believes that students receive more
attention in a small school.
TransformTeaching.org 47 WHPSUS.org
When you i...
If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try
-- Seth Godin Poster by VenSpired.com
TransformTeaching.org 49 WHPSUS.or...
Part 2
Important Quotations and
Discussions
Learning should be fun for the learner.
Abraham S. Fischler.
Dr. Coltea’s comm...
she's good at some things, but if she's cooking, she's
dealing with people on the phone, she's talking to the
kids, she's ...
left the room, she was on her feet, moving to the music.
And they watched for a few minutes and he turned to her
mother an...
If a baby watches more television before age 3, that child
is more likely to have problems with attention in school.
For e...
money into. The goal is to change what we
get when we send citizens to school. --
Seth Godin.
My background is in psycholo...
4. We offer “food for the brain.” We
remind students to include omega-3 fats in
their daily diet. We offer a protein drink...
13. We ask students to carry a notebook
and to copy or take photos of “designs that
you find attractive.” Dan Pink recomme...
Some parents ask, “How many acres do you have
in your school?
We answer, “How many acres do you need to
foster creativity ...
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"The best of the USA and the best of CHINA" is the mantram of my boss, so we pulled together is booklet to describe how certain practices foster creativity. We recommend this free ebook to people who have read Ken Robinson's CREATIVE SCHOOLS book

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25 important ideas to FOSTER CREATIVITY from WHPS School in Hollywood Florida

  1. 1. Please carefully review your Digital Proof download for formatting, grammar, and design issues that may need to be corrected. We recommend that you review your book three times, with each time focusing on a different aspect. Once you are satisfied with your review, you can approve your proof and move forward to the next step in the publishing process. To print this proof we recommend that you scale the PDF to fit the size of your printer paper. Check the format, including headers, footers, page numbers, spacing, table of contents, and index. Review any images or graphics and captions if applicable. Read the book for grammatical errors and typos. 1 2 3 Digital Proofer 25 Important Ideas a... Authored by Ionel Coltea Ed.D. 5.0" x 8.0" (12.70 x 20.32 cm) Black & White on White paper 68 pages ISBN-13: 9781517017514 ISBN-10: 1517017513 25 Important Ideas about Education for Creativity The Methods of Teaching at West Hollywood Private School, Florida Dr. Ionel Coltea Claudia Beatriz Quintanilla Steve McCrea (editor) John Yi
  2. 2. ISBN-13: 978-1517017514 ISBN-10: 1517017513 The materials given here are shared to encourage the people of China and USA to work together. Can we combine the Asian respect for experience and tradition with the West’s impulse and obsession with “something new?” Let us find a balance together. Write to us: SteveEnglishTeacher@gmail.com Visit our website: WHPSus.org TinyURL.com/ForCreativity TinyURL.com/WebForThePeople TransformTeaching.org 1 WHPSUS.org TransformTeaching.org 2 WHPSUS.org
  3. 3. Contents Introduction I cried when I heard this radio show Part 1 Ten Questions Part 2 Important Quotations and Discussions Part 3 Creative Procedures Contact Us TransformTeaching.org 3 WHPSUS.org Introduction I cried when I heard this radio show I am a teacher in Florida. Since 1987 I have helped students improve their scores on the SAT. I scored a perfect 800 in the math and 720 n the verbal (vocabulary). For many years I felt like an effective teacher. Then on April 25, 2005, I listened to a director of a school say, "Students have been told what to do for nine years. When they enter ninth grade, it's rough. We are saying, Follow your interests and passions, make choices. They are not ready, they don't trust adults." Dennis Littky I spent the next week trying to find the radio show and I listened to it four items. I transcribed the words of the interview. You can find the interview TransformTeaching.org 4 WHPSUS.org
  4. 4. by searching “Dennis Littky NPR, 2005 interview small school.” I ordered Littky’s book, the Big Picture. I read his book. I visited his central school, MetCenter.org. BOOK PICTURE <<< From that moment I have tried to become less of a teacher and preacher… I’m more of a facilitator and a guide on the side. Here are some quotes from Dr. Littky’s interview on National Public Radio (April 25, 2005): How kids in good schools are losing out too, and why (The Met's accomplishments) What makes me cry daily is when I hear a kid describe how he or she was before, and then how they found their passion and it changed their life. It's really about the environment that we built to help the kid find his passion. That comes from having respect for the kid and giving the kid time to learn. Half of our great work is because the kid got there when the kid grew up and got more mature. We were just patient. But in most cases, the kids never get to, they get stopped before they did something stupid or they weren't TransformTeaching.org 5 WHPSUS.org interested. By having the faith that the kid will learn and by struggling with that through the years, we can see how far they've come. Our secret is that we have the patience and the belief that anything is possible. Whatever you need to help you get passionate about something is what we do. it's the true belief in the student. Every school says that they respect kids. If you give kids work that is not important, you're not respecting them. I think my frustration with the world is that in many suburban districts where parents move to send their kids and the students come home with their As and Bs, the parents are satisfied, but they never look deeper, so they think those are good schools. They have the highest SAT scores, they have the most kids going to Ivy League colleges. Those kids are losing too. They are not dropping out because they are playing the game. When you ask them, "Have you made any decisions in school? Do you care about anything, are you passionate about anything that goes on during the day besides drama club or football after school?" They're getting the short end. They aren't allowed to get engaged with their work and go deeper. "My kid did well at that school." Yeah, but where could your kid really go if your kid got to work with a doctor in 9th grade, following her around, and really going in depth? TransformTeaching.org 6 WHPSUS.org
  5. 5. The other frustration is kids are dying daily. They are dropping out daily. In some cities, 20 percent graduate high school. Nothing is changed drastically enough. I appreciate the accountability part of No Child Left Behind. There were some school districts that were not clear about standards and the law is helping them focus. The law is not going to help poor kids really achieve. Taking tests is not going to help improve kids. We have to engage them, help them find their passion, we have to respect who they are and where they come from. After hearing this radio interview, I bought his book. Here are some of the quotes that impressed me. When I watch kids walk into the building on their first day of school, I think about what I want them to be like when they walk out on their last day. I also think about what I want them to be like on the day I bump into them in the supermarket 10 or 20 years later. Over the course of three decades watching kids walk into my schools, I have decided that I want them to ● be lifelong learners ● be passionate ● be ready to take risks ● be able to problem-solve and think critically TransformTeaching.org 7 WHPSUS.org ● be able to look at things differently ● be able to work independently and with others ● be creative ● care and want to give back to their community ● persevere ● have integrity and self-respect ● have moral courage ● be able to use the world around them well ● speak well, write well, read well, and work well with numbers ● truly enjoy their life and their work. To me, these are the real goals of education. (page 1) What is Learning? if you can get up and be passionate about something and tell others about what you know, then you are showing that you are educated about that topic. This is what an exhibition3 is: It is kids getting up and talking passionately about a book they've read, a paper they've written, drawings they've made, or even what they know about auto mechanics. It is a way for students to have conversations about the things they have learned. Exhibitions are the best way to measure learning because they put the kids right in the midst of their learning, which makes a lot more sense than asking them to sit quietly for an hour and fill in test bubbles with a pencil. And because exhibitions are interactive, they propel the kids to want to learn more. That is what matters. What is Teaching? TransformTeaching.org 8 WHPSUS.org
  6. 6. In the early 1970s, I was placing student teachers in schools with “open classrooms.” These schools were influenced by a big movement in the '60s that said having kids doing projects in small groups was a better set-up for learning than the traditional lecture format. One of my student teachers, a young, idealistic woman, turned to me one day and said, “This is great, Dennis, but when am I really going to learn how to teach?” She was standing there in an exciting, rich learning environment, but she couldn't see it because it didn't match her idea of what teaching was, which was standing up in front of the room, looking out at quiet rows of faces, and pouring knowledge into them. Teaching is so much more than I ever thought it would be. ~ A Met advisor, after his first year Unfortunately, to most people, teaching is the giving of knowledge. What are you going to tell the students? What is your expertise? But teaching is really about bringing out what's already inside people. TransformTeaching.org 9 WHPSUS.org From Chapter 4 of Littky’s book: What we need is not just smaller schools and realistic education goals, but authentic relationships between educators and kids. What we need are truly personalized schools. A truly personalized school is ultimately flexible: student groupings, schedules, curriculum, activities, and assessment tools are all created to be appropriate to the students and the situations at hand. In a personalized school, the teachers' primary concern is educating their students, not getting through a certain body of subject matter. And in doing this, their primary concern becomes the individual students themselves. No matter how hard schools try, a one-size-fits-all approach to education will always be hit or miss. Can you imagine walking into a medical office and being shuffled off to a room with 20 or 30 other people who have the same complaint or disease, and then watching as the doctor discusses the treatment that all of you will receive before sending everyone out the door with carbon copy prescriptions? Of course not! Doctors see one patient at a time. It's the only way they can really help each person. It's the only way that makes sense. I want to attend The Met school because the school I am currently attending is not a good learning environment for me. The teachers at my school don't understand me and my ways of learning. ~ From an 8th grader's Met application essay TransformTeaching.org 10 WHPSUS.org
  7. 7. Schools that are serious about fulfilling every student's promise must develop structures and relationships that nurture the strengths and energies of each student. Truly personalized learning requires reorganizing schools to start with the student, not the subjects or classes. A school that tries to take personalized education to its full potential is equally concerned with what knowledge students acquire as with how the individual students use and apply that knowledge. The priority at such a school is to know students and their families well enough to ensure that every learning experience excites the students to learn more. There are many great small, personalized schools that do all of this. What I'm saying is, they need to take the idea of personalized learning to the next step: to where every student has a completely different curriculum, based on who he or she is right now and who he or she wants to become. Central to the idea of treating everyone alike differently is understanding that there cannot be a uniform curriculum for every student in the country—or for every student in a single school or classroom, for that matter. Force-feeding kids a rigidly defined body of knowledge is in total opposition to what we know about learning. Everything I know about kids tells me that there is no content that's right for every kid.Photosynthesis or iambic pentameter may be very important to you, but they aren't to me, at least not right now. The book went on to add: TransformTeaching.org 11 WHPSUS.org The order we should be paying attention to is the one inside the kid. So if Marcus is into poetry right now, he shouldn't have to read Hemingway because that's what the 10th grade curriculum requires. He should be reading and writing poetry now because that's the right order for him! Traditional curriculum development looks at all the information we have and determines what needs to go inside each kid. Instead, we need to look at what's already inside the kid and use it to figure out how to help him learn more. One of my staff once told me how she wasn't allowed to follow her interests and write a paper on the Vietnam War in high school because they were still on the Revolutionary War in their textbook. I, in turn, told her one of my favorite Met kid stories. Daniel knew I had been to Southeast Asia and would always ask me questions about Vietnam. One day, I asked him why he was so interested, and he told me that since he was 10 years old, he had been trying to get his dad to talk about the war. Daniel's father was a veteran who was so affected by his experience in Vietnam that he would not speak to his family about it at all. Then Daniel started doing research and writing about his father's war. His dad finally opened his drawer and showed his son his medals. There's more: As part of his “curriculum” at The Met, Daniel took a college training course for teachers on how to teach the Vietnam War. He got an internship helping another local Vietnam veteran build a memorial. By the time Daniel's senior project came around, he had opened up the conversation with his father so much that the two of them worked together to raise enough money for them both to fly to Vietnam. Daniel was 18 then, the same age his father was TransformTeaching.org 12 WHPSUS.org
  8. 8. when he had flown there the first time. Together, they toured the country and learned about the war and its effects on the land and the people. They both kept journals. When they returned, father and son went around and gave speeches about their experience. Daniel even developed a Web site to help other kids talk to their parents about the war. As of this writing, Daniel is a senior in college, preparing to graduate with a degree in history and return to The Met as an advisor. We “allowed” Daniel to study the Vietnam War at that moment, in that way, because that was the “prescribed” curriculum he needed at that time. Again, there is no one body of content that is right for every kid. I was touched deep in my heart by the words of Littky, so I decided to visit his central school in Rhode Island called “the Met.” Here are eight observations that I made while at his school: The Littky Method 1. Ask each student to interview his/her parents, relatives, friends of the family and put together a 75-page biography of the student. Ask “What did you want to be when you were a teenager? What did you dream about?” the TransformTeaching.org 13 WHPSUS.org student learns about the family and gets closer to her history. 2. Ask teachers to get to know the students and parents. In Littky's school, the teacher moves with the student, so the 9th grade teacher becomes the student's 10th grade teacher, etc. The teacher has to be flexible and teach from a variety of textbooks. The teacher even visits the student and gets to know the parents in their home. (Littky considers this part of "treating parents and students with respect.") 3. No grades. Write letters to the students every 9 weeks. Narratives will guide the student toward improvement. The teachers writes “This is what the student planned to do, then this is what the student did, and now here is the plan for the next nine weeks.” 4. The teacher takes time to get to know the student. The student tells the teacher about his interests and passions. The teacher provides multiple ways to let the student choose their own way to discover more about their interests. Choice leads to creativity. 5. After students identify their passions, connect students to mentors (experts in the community) who work in those areas. Let the students see what is needed to perform in their area of interest. (At the Met School in Rhode TransformTeaching.org 14 WHPSUS.org
  9. 9. Island, the student is at the workplace of the mentor for two days in the week.) 6. Learn through real-world, real-work projects. Many schools offer "project-based learning." Littky insists that the projects are connected to the real world. Example: A realtor came to a middle school class and asked the students to assemble a binder about their town that she could show to new clients -- the kids produced a 90-page looseleaf binder in two weeks. They worked hard because "that lady is expecting us to give her something real." Littky uses this example to explain why students need contact with the real world and why his school is everywhere where there are mentors. 7. A plan for each student. The teacher meets with the individual and creates an individual education plan for every student. 8. Stand up and perform your understanding. Tests are "stand ups" or presentations. Students sit for written tests, too, but the focus of learning and evaluation is the "exhibition." TransformTeaching.org 15 WHPSUS.org So, you see why I cried when I first heard Dennis littky on the radio? I cried for joy because I had found the words I needed to explain what I wanted to teach. I also cried in sadness for the hundreds of students that I had limited with my teaching decisions. TransformTeaching.org 16 WHPSUS.org
  10. 10. Part 1 Ten Questions to Ask Your Child’s Teacher Procedures from a Small School West Hollywood Private School Hollywood, Florida www.WHPSUS.org TransformTeaching.org 17 WHPSUS.org These procedures come from Edutopia.com, Eric Mazur’s PeerInstruction.net, HighTechHigh.org, MetCenter.org and dozens of other websites and innovative schools in the USA. These procedures are part of the school work at West Hollywood Private School. TinyURL.com/AskTeachers10 Images from the Internet appear in this book. Some of the creative posters by Krissy come from VenSpired.com. We have permission from Krissy to share these posters. Go for it! You have my full permission. The book looks like a fabulous way to spread creativity! -- VenSpired.com TransformTeaching.org 18 WHPSUS.org
  11. 11. This section of the book is dedicated to a creative teacher, Gustavo Fraga. The logo comes from an incident in a school… Fraga walked into his classroom, put books on his desk, pulled a sheet from a folder and asked, “Is there anything that you want to learn today?” “Sir, I’m not sure about the way to balance an equation. You showed us last week, but I’d like a review.” Fraga looked at the sheet in his hand, grasped the top edge of the sheet in both hands and ripped it into two pieces. He walked to a wastebasket and threw away his lesson plan. He proceeded to answer the student’s question. This book celebrates teachers who focus on what the students want to learn. TransformTeaching.org 19 WHPSUS.org Summary -1. Ask teachers to put lectures on video. At Harvard University, some professors put parts of their lectures on a video and the students arrive in class ready to discuss the video lecture. The students can pause the video at home and take time to understand and get new thinking. This means that lecture videos help students become more creative. -2. Ask teachers to create a Personal Learning Plan for your child. Each student has an individual intelligence, different from other students, so he needs an individual way to go through the course. -3. Collect your child’s school work in a website. When a student can look at his work (from several years) in one place, it becomes easier to see the creative connections between courses. -4. Ask teachers to let students discuss the new information instead of listening to a lecture. This promotes diverse intelligence. Students can often use different words to describe the same subject. -5. Ask teachers to guide students in creating projects that include several subjects. Working together stimulates creativity. TransformTeaching.org 20 WHPSUS.org
  12. 12. -6. Ask teachers to find apps for the student to use on their mobile phones. -7. Ask teachers for their mobile phone numbers. Sometimes a student wants to ask an important question, but forgets the question when she is in class the next day. Creativity is often encouraged when there is a quick reply from the teacher. -8. Ask teachers to look at your child as an individual. Ask your teacher to teach your child all four years of high school. This is the procedure at Big Picture Schools. -9. Ask teachers to put the Five Guiding Questions on the classroom walls. (From the Big Picture Schools). These questions push students to find deeper learning. -10. Show the 10 Expectations from LeavingToLearn.org to every teacher in your child’s school. The Here are ten ways to make your child’s education more creative. TransformTeaching.org 21 WHPSUS.org The principal at High Tech High gives advice about good procedures. TransformTeaching.org 22 WHPSUS.org
  13. 13. 1 Ask teachers to put their lectures on videos. Short lectures are put on video for the student to view BEFORE the class. Students should arrive in class ready to discuss the topic for the day. The class time is for one-on-one tutoring and small group discussions. tinyurl.com/LecturesAreDead “Research shows it's impossible for students to take in and remember all the information presented during a typical lecture.” American RadioWorks How to make class work more interesting. TransformTeaching.org 23 WHPSUS.org TinyURL.com/LecturesAreDead1 PeerInstruction.net TinyURL.com/LecturesAreDead2 The video (60 seconds) Katie Gimbar, a teacher in North Carolina, shows the problems with lectures in a typical classroom. TransformTeaching.org 24 WHPSUS.org
  14. 14. Katie Gimbar explains how she makes videos for students to watch before they come to class. TransformTeaching.org 25 WHPSUS.org 2 Ask for a Personal Learning Plan. Ask teachers to start with your child. Connect the homework and school work to the child’s interests. This procedure is used at Big Picture Schools (MetCenter.org). This is not an Individual Education Plan (IEP), which helps the student adapt to the textbook and the system (putting a square peg in a round hole). The Personal Learning Plan is unique to each student. An example of a Personal Learning Plan TransformTeaching.org 26 WHPSUS.org
  15. 15. Often the plans are completed with the help of the parents. Teachers need training to prepare to work together to make projects and personal learning plans. TransformTeaching.org 27 WHPSUS.org 3 Collect your child’s school work in a website. Students at High Tech High School in San Diego, California use free Google Sites web space for showing their projects and school work. TinyURL.com/ExampleDP. Ben Staley’s website showing his school work and projects (High Tech High School) TransformTeaching.org 28 WHPSUS.org
  16. 16. This book shows you how to organize school work on the website. The book was written by Dennis Yuzenas, Steve McCrea, Omar Vasile, Ben Staley, Matt Blazek and Mario Llorente. TransformTeaching.org 29 WHPSUS.org 4 Ask teachers to let students discuss the new information instead of listening to a lecture. Ask teachers to use the method called “Turn to Your Neighbor” that Harvard University developed. TinyURL.com/EricMazur TinyURL.com/TurnToYourNeighbor TransformTeaching.org 30 WHPSUS.org
  17. 17. Julie Schell explains the method of “turn to your neighbor” and “peer instruction.” Students discuss a question in class. 5 Ask teachers to guide students in creating projects that include several subjects. For example, the math, science and history teachers can create one project together with the student. This procedure is easier when one teacher teachers several subjects (perhaps English Grammar, a foreign language and history). WHPSUS.org uses a project book by Matt Blazek. TinyURL.com/BlazekProjects TransformTeaching.org 31 WHPSUS.org This video explains how to use the Project Book. www.TinyURL.com/MattBlazek “Projects are the way to go.” Bill Gates during a visit to High Tech High School, San Diego, Calif. TransformTeaching.org 32 WHPSUS.org
  18. 18. Omar Vasile gives advice about how to organize projects. Dennis Yuzenas describes a project with National History Day. TransformTeaching.org 33 WHPSUS.org 6 Ask teachers to find apps for the student to use. Many hours of classroom practice are spent reviewing … and some of that reviewing can be done outside the classroom on apps. A teacher who can be replaced by a computer should be replaced by a computer. Arthur C. Clarke, author of 2001: A Space Odyssey. The teacher becomes a facilitator. The teacher is not the source of information. The teacher helps students manage their time. TransformTeaching.org 34 WHPSUS.org
  19. 19. A vocabulary app. TransformTeaching.org 35 WHPSUS.org A math app. TransformTeaching.org 36 WHPSUS.org
  20. 20. This video shows students how to review new words. TransformTeaching.org 37 WHPSUS.org 7 Ask teachers for their mobile phone numbers. “Can my child send you questions at night and on weekends?” The questions can often be put in a photo and sent to the teacher’s mobile phone. When a student has a question, the student can take a photo and send the question to the teacher. The teacher can make a short video and reply to that student. The student can view the answer and learn outside the classroom. The “Just In Time” Learning Method - The student finds a difficult problem. - The student takes a photo and sends the photo to the teacher’s mobile phone. - The teacher looks at the problem, writes an explanation, makes a movie and sends the movie to the student. - The student explains the solution the next day in class to other students. TransformTeaching.org 38 WHPSUS.org
  21. 21. 8 Ask teachers to look at your child as an individual. Ask the teachers to teach your child all four years of high school. This is the procedure at Big Picture Schools. The same teacher stays with the same students for four years. This often happens in a small school. Each student has his own lesson plan for each day. Ask teachers to ask “What do you want to learn today?” Teachers have been told to teach students the Seven Survival Skills that Tony Wagner has identified. Search “Seven Survival Skills Tony Wagner.” Initiative and Entrepreneurship can be developed if the teacher allows students time to make the first move. Neil Postman gave this advice: Ask the students, “What do you want to learn today?” The only way to know where a kid is 'at' is to listen to what he is saying. -- Neil Postman TransformTeaching.org 39 WHPSUS.org Tony Wagner interviewed over 200 managers to find out “what do students need to know.” Tony Wagner asks students to show their skills. TransformTeaching.org 40 WHPSUS.org
  22. 22. 9 Ask teachers to put the Five Guiding Questions on the classroom walls. (From the Big Picture Schools) You can get the exact wording of the questions by going to TinyURL.com/metquestions HOW DO I DESCRIBE THIS SITUATION? (How do I talk about the problem?) WHAT NUMBERS DO I NEED TO USE? (What kind of math do I need for this topic?) HOW DO I COMMUNICATE THIS INFORMATION? (Should I use a poster or a video? Where can I get more information? How do I get more information?) WHAT DID OTHER PEOPLE WRITE ABOUT THIS TOPIC? (What is the history of this topic?) WHAT CAN I ADD TO THIS TOPIC? (How can I make this topic personal to me?) metcenter.org/about-us/one-student-at-a-time/goals TransformTeaching.org 41 WHPSUS.org 10 Show the 10 Expectations from LeavingToLearn.org to every teacher in your child’s school. These ten "Questions that Parents Can Ask" come from a video that supports Leaving to Learn, a book by Elliot Washor and Charles Wojkowski. LeavingToLearn.org TransformTeaching.org 42 WHPSUS.org
  23. 23. Relationships Am I just another face in the classroom? or do my teachers know about me and my interests and talents? Do the teachers help me form relationships with peers and adults who might serve as models and coaches? Relevance Is the work just a series of hoops to jump? Or is the work relevant to my interests? Do my teachers help me understand how my learning contributes to my community? Time Am I expected to learn at a pace decided by my teacher or can I learn at my own pace? Is there time for learning to be deep as well as broad? Timing Do all students have to learn things in the same sequence or can I learn in an order that fits my learning style or interests? TransformTeaching.org 43 WHPSUS.org Play Is there always pressure to perform? Or do I have opportunities to explore? Make mistakes and learn from them? Do I have opportunities to tinker and make guesses? Practice Do we learn something and then immediately move on to the next skill? Or can we engage in deep and sustained practice of the skills that we need to learn? Choice Am I following the same path as every student? Or do I have real choices about what, how and when I will learn and demonstrate my abilities? TransformTeaching.org 44 WHPSUS.org
  24. 24. Authenticity Is my work just a series of worksheets? Or is the learning and work I do considered significant outside of school, by experts, family and employers? Does the community recognize the value of my work? Challenge is the school work just about completing assignments? Or do I feel challenged? Am I addressing high and meaningful standards? Application Is my learning all theoretical? Or do I have opportunities to apply what I’m learning in real world settings? TinyURL.com/MattBlazek Ask the history teacher to “teach history backwards.” If we start with the years that the child knows, then we can connect to the history of his grandfather. historyinreverse.blogspot.com TransformTeaching.org 45 WHPSUS.org These ten procedures will help teachers be more effective. The teachers will prepare your child for the Global Market. We use these methods at our school in West Hollywood, Florida. This book describes the benefits of small schools. TransformTeaching.org 46 WHPSUS.org
  25. 25. Bill Gates believes that students receive more attention in a small school. TransformTeaching.org 47 WHPSUS.org When you insist on making the world better, then you matter. -- Seth Godin Poster by VenSpired.com TransformTeaching.org 48 WHPSUS.org
  26. 26. If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try -- Seth Godin Poster by VenSpired.com TransformTeaching.org 49 WHPSUS.org This book is dedicated to Gustavo Fraga, an advisor to hundreds of young people. The principal reason for your learning how to listen to students is that you may increase your understanding of what the students perceive as relevant. The only way to know where a kid is 'at' is to listen to what he is saying. You can't do this if you are talking. Teaching as a Subversive Activity page 164 Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner TinyURL.com/PostmanPDF TransformTeaching.org 50 WHPSUS.org
  27. 27. Part 2 Important Quotations and Discussions Learning should be fun for the learner. Abraham S. Fischler. Dr. Coltea’s comments: Learning happens when we take the student from point A and get him to point B. That will be different for each student. The important thing is to make a difference and make the learning fun. The curriculum should be flexible based on the needs of the student. Give students choices. (from a meeting with his teachers) TransformTeaching.org 51 WHPSUS.org Ken Robinson talks about the difference between imagination and creativity. We know three things about intelligence. One, it's diverse. We think about the world in all the ways that we experience it. We think visually, we think in sound, we think kinesthetically. We think in abstract terms, we think in movement. Secondly, intelligence is dynamic. If you look at the interactions of a human brain, as we heard yesterday from a number of presentations, intelligence is wonderfully interactive. The brain isn't divided into compartments. In fact, creativity -- which I define as the process of having original ideas that have value -- more often than not comes about through the interaction of different disciplinary ways of seeing things. By the way, there's a shaft of nerves that joins the two halves of the brain called the corpus callosum. It's thicker in women. Following off from Helen yesterday, this is probably why women are better at multi-tasking. Because you are, aren't you? There's a raft of research, but I know it from my personal life. If my wife is cooking a meal at home -- which is not often, thankfully. (Laughter) No, TransformTeaching.org 52 WHPSUS.org
  28. 28. she's good at some things, but if she's cooking, she's dealing with people on the phone, she's talking to the kids, she's painting the ceiling, she's doing open-heart surgery over here. If I'm cooking, the door is shut, the kids are out, the phone's on the hook, if she comes in I get annoyed. I say, "Terry, please, I'm trying to fry an egg in here." (Laughter) "Give me a break." (Laughter)Actually, do you know that old philosophical thing, if a tree falls in a forest and nobody hears it, did it happen? Remember that old chestnut? I saw a great t-shirt recently, which said, "If a man speaks his mind in a forest, and no woman hears him, is he still wrong?" (Laughter) And the third thing about intelligence is, it's distinct. I'm doing a new book at the moment called "Epiphany," which is based on a series of interviews with people about how they discovered their talent. I'm fascinated by how people got to be there. It's really prompted by a conversation I had with a wonderful woman who maybe most people have never heard of, Gillian Lynne. Have you heard of her? Some have. She's a choreographer, and everybody knows her work. She did "Cats" and "Phantom of the Opera." She's wonderful. I used to be on the board of The Royal Ballet, as you can see.Anyway, Gillian and I had TransformTeaching.org 53 WHPSUS.org lunch one day and I said, "How did you get to be a dancer?" It was interesting. When she was at school, she was really hopeless. And the school, in the '30s, wrote to her parents and said, "We think Gillian has a learning disorder." She couldn't concentrate; she was fidgeting. I think now they'd say she had ADHD. Wouldn't you? But this was the 1930s, and ADHD hadn't been invented at this point. It wasn't an available condition. (Laughter) People weren't aware they could have that.(Laughter) Anyway, she went to see this specialist. So, this oak-paneled room, and she was there with her mother, and she was led and sat on this chair at the end, and she sat on her hands for 20 minutes while this man talked to her mother about the problems Gillian was having at school. Because she was disturbing people; her homework was always late; and so on, little kid of eight. In the end, the doctor went and sat next to Gillian, and said, "I've listened to all these things your mother's told me, I need to speak to her privately. Wait here. We'll be back; we won't be very long," and they went and left her. But as they went out of the room, he turned on the radio that was sitting on his desk. And when they got out, he said to her mother, "Just stand and watch her." And the minute they TransformTeaching.org 54 WHPSUS.org
  29. 29. left the room, she was on her feet, moving to the music. And they watched for a few minutes and he turned to her mother and said, "Mrs. Lynne, Gillian isn't sick; she's a dancer. Take her to a dance school." I said, "What happened?" She said, "She did. I can't tell you how wonderful it was. We walked in this room and it was full of people like me. People who couldn't sit still.People who had to move to think." Who had to move to think. They did ballet, they did tap, jazz; they did modern; they did contemporary. She was eventually auditioned for the Royal Ballet School; she became a soloist; she had a wonderful career at the Royal Ballet. She eventually graduated from the Royal Ballet School, founded the Gillian Lynne Dance Company, met Andrew Lloyd Webber. She's been responsible for some of the most successful musical theater productions in history, she's given pleasure to millions, and she's a multimillionaire. Somebody else might have put her on medication and told her to calm down. Search “TED Talk Ken Robinson creativity” TransformTeaching.org 55 WHPSUS.org http://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_ says_schools_kill_creativity/transcript?lan guage=en Sugata Mitra tells us about the ability of students to teach themselves with his hole in the wall project: I got an interesting phone call once from Columbo, from the late Arthur C. Clarke, who said, "I want to see what's going on." And he couldn't travel, so I went over there. He said two interesting things, "A teacher that can be replaced by a machine should be." The second thing he said was that, "If children have interest, then education happens." And I was doing that in the field, so every time I would watch it and think of him. ======================== Search: Sugata Mitra hole in the wall ted. Dimitri Christiakis, “Media, Children and the Mind.” TransformTeaching.org 56 WHPSUS.org
  30. 30. If a baby watches more television before age 3, that child is more likely to have problems with attention in school. For each hour that they watch per day before the age of 3, the change of having an attention problem increases 10 percent. A child who watches two hours of TV a day before the age of three, will be 20 percent more likely to have attention problems compared to a child who watched none. A child who receives cognitive stimulation is more likely to have better attention. Cognitive stimulation includes reading to the child, taking the child to a museum, singing to the child. Reading to your child reduces the problems of attention later in life. Each hour of cognitive stimulation per day reduced the chance of getting an attention problem by 30 percent -- Dimitri Christiakis ====== Seth Godin asks us to “stop killing dreams”... http://www.sethgodin.com/sg/docs/stopst ealingdreamsscreen.pdf TransformTeaching.org 57 WHPSUS.org If school’s function is to create the workers we need to fuel our economy, we need to change school, because the workers we need have changed as well. The mission used to be to create homogenized, obedient, satisfied workers and pliant, eager consumers. No longer. Changing school doesn’t involve sharpening the pencil we’ve already got. School reform cannot succeed if it focuses on getting schools to do a better job of what we previously asked them to do. We don’t need more of what schools produce when they’re working as designed. The challenge, then, is to change the very output of the school before we start spending even more time and money improving the performance of the school. The goal of this manifesto is to create a new set of questions and demands that parents, taxpayers, and kids can bring to the people they’ve chosen, the institution we’ve built and invested our time and TransformTeaching.org 58 WHPSUS.org
  31. 31. money into. The goal is to change what we get when we send citizens to school. -- Seth Godin. My background is in psychology. When it comes to teaching, I implement the cognitive and behavioral components of a student for the learning experience. For instance, some students may have differences in intelligence, motivation, performance, emotion, self- regulation, and cognitive development. This sort of understanding is improvised to make the classroom environment flexible. With the combination of a neuroscientific approach to the application of early teachings of Plato and Aristotle, this teaching style makes the learning experience versatile. --- Claudia Quintanilla TransformTeaching.org 59 WHPSUS.org Part 3 Creative Procedures These are procedures that we use at your school in Florida. The West Hollywood Private School is independent of the state system of public schools. We use procedures that appear adapted to individuals. 1. We have a music keyboard in the classroom. Someone in the group usually knows how to play the piano and it gives students a chance to show their love of music. 2. We use mobile phones to help boys write essays. Many boys don’t like to write. So we invite students to bring their smartphones to class. They speak to the phone and the phone writes their words. Then they can send the words to a word program like Google Docs. 3. We begin with the “end of the course” in our minds. We ask our students to think about how their time will be used to create essays, projects and new understanding. TransformTeaching.org 60 WHPSUS.org
  32. 32. 4. We offer “food for the brain.” We remind students to include omega-3 fats in their daily diet. We offer a protein drink with fruit and oats (it is called “a smoothie”) and we give free sardines to students who want fish. Foods include nuts, tomatoes, blueberries, black beans, walnuts, yogurt, carrots and spinach. 5. We interrupt our work every twenty minutes to increase blood flow. We take time to stand up, stretch, sit down again. This simple act increases the blood flow in the legs and the rest of the body, including the brain. 6. We remind students about their posture. We even check to see if the students are wearing the same shoes for three days 7. We put posters on walls. Some students don’t want to be told to do something. Eventually they get the right idea because they are given choices. We let the walls teach. We use a method called “the third teacher” (we recommend the website thethirdteacherplus.com), where posters carry messages to the students. TransformTeaching.org 61 WHPSUS.org 8. We put interesting books on tables in our school. We dont always tell students to read the book. 9. We use Apple computers for specific creative reasons. The Screenshot (shift + Command + 4) is a very helpful tool for creativity. We encourage students to use the right tool for the right situation. 10. We sometimes don’t help the students so that they can develop their own creative answers. I sometimes allow the students to arrange the chairs in the classroom so that they develop their own sense of “what is beautiful.” Maria Montessori wrote, “The students are working as if the teacher does not exist.” 11. We use “lateral thinking puzzles.” These puzzles guide the student to think outside of the standard choices of “yes/no” and “with vs. without.” See the work of Edward deBono. 12. We show images of “negative space.” Look at the logo for FedEd. What do you see? Look at the images that have a picture inside the logo. That’s how to stimulate creativity. TransformTeaching.org 62 WHPSUS.org
  33. 33. 13. We ask students to carry a notebook and to copy or take photos of “designs that you find attractive.” Dan Pink recommends that we should all keep a record of “what is good design?” In his interview with Oprah, Pink pointed out that “designers give us things that we didn’t know we needed.” (Oprah bought 4500 copies of Pink’s book to give to graduates of Stanford University in 2005). 14. We keep tools in the classroom, ready for the next idea. “Tools” We encourage students to use their smartphones and computers, but we also make paper and pens available. 15. We let students put things together and them them apart. We have a “take apart” lab to allow students to disassemble broken computers, printers and cameras. “Find out how it works” is a reliable teacher. 16. We ask students to watch movies. Movies are the literature of our age. Understanding the genre, and knowing about “what came before” in films will help students analyze films. We also ask TransformTeaching.org 63 WHPSUS.org students to take turns presenting the films and guiding the discussion. 17. We interrupt movies every 10 or 20 minutes. Research shows that people who watch movies with interruptions remember more details about the movie than viewers who watch the movie without interruption. TransformTeaching.org 64 WHPSUS.org
  34. 34. Some parents ask, “How many acres do you have in your school? We answer, “How many acres do you need to foster creativity in your child?” Some famous people, like Bill Gates, are very interested in education. They are worried about our schools because they had a bad experience in high school. Bill Gates doesn’t want high school to be boring in the future. He wants more creativity in high schools. Contact Us Please send comments to Steve at SteveEnglishTeacher@gmail.com QQ: 2784033372 Skype: SteveEnglishTeacher Mobile: +1 (954) 646 8246 TransformTeaching.org 65 WHPSUS.org Thank you for reading this book. Share this ebook with other people TinyURL.com/ForCreativity TinyURL.com/WebForThePeople TransformTeaching.org 66 WHPSUS.org
  35. 35. Proof Printed By Createspace Digital Proofer
  • theebookman

    Nov. 28, 2015

"The best of the USA and the best of CHINA" is the mantram of my boss, so we pulled together is booklet to describe how certain practices foster creativity. We recommend this free ebook to people who have read Ken Robinson's CREATIVE SCHOOLS book You can learn more about our efforts at www.XYDFoundation.org We invite you to join our "17 clicks" campaign www.TINYURL.com/xyd17clicks

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