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Adobe Audience Manager Readiness Playbook

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The objective of this document is to get your business operationally ready for the implementation and deployment of Adobe Audience Manager (AAM). This will help you and your organisation – as new Adobe Audience Manager user – to drive maximum value from your investment in Adobe technology.

Although we have seen many projects succeed, others have faltered due to a lack of internal investment in the business to ensure they are operationally ready to adopt this new technology. This playbook will help guide you to avoid some of the common areas we have identified as missing in less successful implementations.

Publié dans : Business
  • The second installment in this series draws a comparison between the setup process of both Adobe Audience Manager and Salesforce Audience Studio. http://bit.ly/2YVxJxU
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  • The first part of this Adobe Audience Manager and Salesforce Audience Studio talks about data collection. The biggest selling point of a DMP is the idea of collecting behavioral data (Web, App and Mobile) in real-time. Both Adobe and Salesforce do this well but a bit differently. http://bit.ly/2NehmLq
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  • Adobe Summit 2019: we bring you a list of Top Audience Manager (DMP) Sessions that we recommend you attend so you make the best out of your Summit experience. http://bit.ly/2J6SL9x
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Adobe Audience Manager Readiness Playbook

  1. 1. Adobe Audience Manager Operational Readiness Playbook Created by: Scott Rigby and David Contreras Date: June 2015
  2. 2. Playbook Objective The objective of this document is to get your business operationally ready for the implementation and deployment of Adobe Audience. This will help you and your organisation – as new Adobe Audience Manager user – to drive maximum value from your investment in Adobe technology. Although we have seen many projects succeed, others have faltered due to a lack of internal investment in the business to ensure they are operationally ready to adopt this new technology. This playbook will help guide you to avoid some of the common areas we have identified as missing in less successful implementations. The recommendations and best practices in Adobe playbooks are ideally intended to be applied to your business in parallel to your technology solution deployment, to ensure that by the time you go-live with your solution your business is best positioned to realise value from your investment. Adobe playbooks use a common digital governance structure focusing on the key areas of leadership, strategy, people, product and process to deliver a robust approach to readying your business whether you are deploying one Adobe solution or multiple. This playbook should be read by: Chief Marketing Officer Head of Digital, Head of Strategy, Head of Marketing Head of Analytics, Customer Insights Lead, Digital Channel Analyst Solution Architects, Head of Implementation, Digital Implementation Leads Program Managers, Project Managers, Business Analysts
  3. 3. Contents 1 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................... 6 1.1 About Adobe Audience Manager ..................................................................................6 1.1.1 Types of Data Collected.........................................................................................6 1.1.2 Custom Segment Generation.................................................................................7 1.1.3 Performance Reporting..........................................................................................7 1.1.4 Ad Server Integration.............................................................................................8 1.1.5 Destination Publishing ...........................................................................................8 1.1.6 Tag Management...................................................................................................9 1.1.7 Data Security and Privacy......................................................................................9 1.2 About this Playbook ......................................................................................................9 2 LEADERSHIP......................................................................................................... 10 2.1 Sponsorship................................................................................................................11 2.2 Buy-In .........................................................................................................................12 2.3 Communication...........................................................................................................12 2.3.1 Communication management ..............................................................................12 2.3.2 Recommended communications process and principles......................................13 2.3.3 Setting communication goals ...............................................................................13 2.3.4 Recommendations on a communication approach...............................................14 2.4 Accountability..............................................................................................................15 2.4.1 Steering committee..............................................................................................16 2.4.2 Common roles and responsibilities within a steering committee...........................16 2.4.3 Setting up a working group ..................................................................................19 3 STRATEGY............................................................................................................ 19 3.1 Digital Marketing Maturity Model .................................................................................20 3.2 Focus..........................................................................................................................25 3.2.1 Digital Strategy ....................................................................................................25 3.2.2 Key Performance Indicator:..................................................................................29 3.3 Alignment....................................................................................................................30 3.3.1 Targeting and Personalisation Strategy ...............................................................31 3.3.2 Building your segments........................................................................................32
  4. 4. 3.3.3 Targeting and Personalisation .............................................................................33 3.4 Innovation ...................................................................................................................33 4 PEOPLE ................................................................................................................. 33 4.1 Expertise.....................................................................................................................33 4.2 Structure.....................................................................................................................34 4.2.1 Structures Types..................................................................................................35 4.2.2 Project Based Recommended Organisational Structure ......................................36 4.2.3 Business Recommended Organisational Structure ..............................................37 4.2.4 Roles & Responsibilities ......................................................................................38 4.3 Resources...................................................................................................................44 4.3.1 Resource Model...................................................................................................44 4.4 Community..................................................................................................................45 4.5 Culture........................................................................................................................46 5 PROCESS .............................................................................................................. 47 5.1 Deployment.................................................................................................................47 5.1.1 Implementation Methodology ...............................................................................48 5.1.2 Data Integration Methods.....................................................................................53 5.2 Usage .........................................................................................................................55 5.2.1 Administration......................................................................................................56 5.2.2 Access Levels......................................................................................................56 5.3 Sustainability...............................................................................................................58 5.3.1 Maintaining a Single View of the Customers ........................................................58 5.3.2 Process to Adopt Traditional or Emerging Channels ............................................58 5.3.3 Track and Upgrade ..............................................................................................58 5.3.4 Optimise and Report for Success.........................................................................58 6 TECHNOLOGY / PRODUCT.................................................................................. 59 6.1 Solution fit...................................................................................................................59 6.1.1 Solution Architecture............................................................................................59 6.2 Integrations.................................................................................................................62 6.2.1 Marketing Cloud Integrations ...............................................................................62 6.2.2 Common Third-Party Integrations ........................................................................63 6.3 Data Security and Privacy...........................................................................................65
  5. 5. 6.4 Democratisation..........................................................................................................70 6.4.1 Automation ..........................................................................................................71 6.5 Leveraging your investment (The Big Picture).............................................................71 7 CHECKLIST ........................................................................................................... 73 8 ADOBE AUDIENCE MANAGER PRODUCT MATURITY ACTIVITIES................. 74 9 ASSISTANCE CONSULTING OPERATIONAL MATURITY REVIEW .................. 75 10 ADOBE AUDIENCE MANAGER GLOSSARY OF TERMS................................ 75 11 ADOBE AUDIENCE MANAGER TEMPLATES.................................................. 78 11.1 Customer Profile Template .........................................................................................78 11.2 Deep dive insights request template: ..........................................................................79
  6. 6. 1 Introduction 1.1 About Adobe Audience Manager Adobe Audience Manager is the industry’s first data management platform that consolidates audience information from all available sources. It identifies, quantifies and optimises high-value target audiences, which can then be offered to advertisers via an integrated, secure, privacy- friendly management system that works across all advertising distribution platforms. Adobe Audience Manager helps you manage your data pipeline by bringing your audience data sets together, making it easy to collect commercially relevant information about site visitors, create marketable segments and serve targeted advertising and content to the right audience. The solution also offers easy tag deployment and management with robust data collection, control and protection. 1.1.1 Types Of Data Collected Adobe Audience Manager helps you collect and manage first-party, second-party and third-party data. Unlocking customer information assets stored in multiple silos is one of the biggest data challenges faced by companies today. From CRM databases, to registration systems, to ad servers and so forth, companies require tools that help centralise valuable data and manage customer and audience information as a single strategic data asset. Adobe Audience Manager helps you unlock isolated customer information and manage data collection from multiple sources. Collected data can be managed based on data element time-to-live (TTL) values, which helps your organisation control data expiration across all sources. Audience Manager is designed to help you manage the following types of data:  First-party data collection (own data): First-party data collection is a main Adobe Audience Manager feature. This core competency addresses the needs of publishers or advertisers who want to use proprietary data as the cornerstone of their marketing programs or for targeting and modelling against other data sources.  Second-party data collection (partner data): Second-party data comes from a strategic business partner (it's not publisher data). This information is collected and managed just like first-party data. Tip Publishers: Companies that manage the placement of advertisements, texts and other product links on behalf of a company (advertiser). Industries associated in this category are Media, Entertainment, Loyalty and Retail. Advertisers: Companies that own sales, inventories and marketing activities of products or services. Advertisers partner with publishers to promote their offerings. Common industries associated to the advertisers are automobile, finance, insurance manufacturers, and travel.
  7. 7.  Third-party data collection (purchased data): Third-party data is information purchased, collected and shared by vendors outside of Adobe Audience Manager. 1.1.2 Custom Segment Generation Data sources are represented in a client-specific trait taxonomy. Publishers can customise and modify this taxonomy based on their data source and business use cases. Within the Adobe Audience Manager interface, publisher team members can browse traits and segments to combine them into new marketing segments. You can also report on historical trait and segment size as segments are created. This helps publisher team members understand potential inventory and lets them adjust segment composition based on reporting data. Qualification begins after a segment is saved in the Adobe Audience Manager interface. The system uses two complimentary methodologies that help ensure full segment coverage across a publisher’s entire user base:  Instant segment qualification: Qualifies users based on real-time data collection processes.  Processed segments: Back-end processing of users not yet seen again who qualify based on new segment rules criteria. 1.1.3 Performance Reporting Adobe Audience Manager offers standard reporting interfaces for all data stored on user traits and segments, including segment sizes, segment composition, targeting platform mappings (destinations) and custom reports. Overlap analysis and lookalike modelling In addition to custom segment generation and standard reporting, publishers are interested in understanding data relationships between all of their data elements and segments. Adobe Audience Manager can create data overlay reports based on a publisher’s specific needs. Some examples might include:  Third-party data overlaid against first-party data.  Third-party to third-party overlap for data analysis and scoring (e.g. gender across four providers).  First-party data relationships.  Segment-to-segment overlap and analysis for additional lookalike modelling.
  8. 8. The Adobe consulting teams and partner solutions can work with you to understand your data and reporting needs, create report templates, create custom reports and schedule delivery of all overlap and lookalike reports. Inventory and audience insight Inventory and audience insight is closely tied to segment generation and overlay reporting. Inventory and audience insight reports help you understand:  How audiences overlap, or trend, against individual sites and domains.  Potential ad inventory based on unique users within audience segments. Audience overlap against sites and domains As part of a data collection strategy, publishers can capture site, domain and site groupings in the standard data. This gives publishers full visibility into overlap across sites, by data segment across sites or overlap of any data combination of trait, segment, site, domain or site grouping. Data is available in a number of areas depending on the specific use case:  Standard reporting based on overlap segments generated.  Custom overlay report templates as defined above.  Segment creation wizard available via the user interface. 1.1.4 Ad Server Integration The platform allows you to manage a single data repository and then leverage that data across all your channels. This can include ad servers, content optimisation, creative optimisation, video delivery and search. Adobe Audience Manager has developed a central interface for managing new targeting destinations that provide multiple integration points depending on the use case and technical implementation of the external system. 1.1.5 Destination Publishing With data management platforms, it is important to standardise the data transfer mechanisms so they can be easily configured and managed by Adobe’s systems. When the data arrives to the target system (ad server, DSP, ad network, etc.) that system is called the destination. Adobe Audience Manager allows publishers to easily set up new destinations in the interface with the
  9. 9. “destination builder” which helps you manage URL, cookie-based or server-to-server destinations. 1.1.6 Dynamic Tag Management Dynamic tag management is a key feature of the Audience Manager platform. Dynamic tag management consists of two core components: JavaScript container code and a graphical user interface that helps you manage tags for deployment and data collection on your Web site. The system lets customers create, schedule, deploy and manage their own tags. Additionally, the intuitive management interface uses conditional logic that provides flexibility when managing tags across a complex site environment. Adobe is committed to developing this platform and supporting our clients and partners. We are also working to integrate our platform into the Adobe Marketing Cloud. 1.1.7 Data Security And Privacy Data security is an important part of any data management system. Adobe Audience Manager has controls and systems designed to improve data security and prevent data leakage. 1.2 About This Playbook This document follows a structure that will help you understand the key focus areas to nurture the implementation of Adobe Audience Manager. This structure is based the digital governance framework, which creates the appropriate business environment for digital to succeed. It includes:  Leadership—Executive buy-in and support for the implementation and adoption.  Strategy—Clarity and alignment around key business goals for evaluating digital performance.  People—Resources, expertise and the appropriate team structure to run Adobe Audience Manager effectively.  Process—Procedures, project management and workflows for deploying and using Adobe Audience Manager effectively.  Product—Solution fit, common integration and automation. Tip Click here to read more on the Data Security and Privacy
  10. 10. What’s different about digital? Everything. 2 Leadership Leadership is critical — it provides the foundation for successful digital transformation. C-Suite involvement is needed to drive a digital transformation program, budget and outcome. Your role as the project sponsor is to contribute with a strong understanding of how Adobe Audience Manager and digital in general will transform the business. Position yourself as the subject matter expert and functional leader in a hands-on mode. A common trait you will find in successful digital teams is that they are owned and managed by people who are prepared to make the necessary investments in talent, equipment and training. Leaders are skilled at extracting Tip Projects which have an executive sponsor, project name, defined budget & KPIs set across the team outperform those that don’t. People Culture shift, new skills, strategic in-sourcing, diverse talent and skillset. Strategy - Aligned to business goals, common goals and KPIs, communicated to business. Process ‘Always-on marketing’, testing and next-best offer. A single source of truth. Digital and traditional merge. Product (Technology) Deploy the right technology to deliver the best customer experience. Leadership Stakeholder buy-in, single executive sponsor, defined program of work and Budget, insight-driven culture.
  11. 11. optimal performance from team members and developing strategies that take full advantage of their unique talents. Leadership consists of four subcomponents: sponsorship, buy-in, communication and accountability. 2.1 Sponsorship Having an effective executive sponsor will help the project achieve maximum success. To be truly effective, this internal executive sponsor should have enough seniority and influence within the business to get buy-in from other stakeholders across the organisation. Having a high level of self-interest in the project’s success and a passion for digital transformation — and truly believing in how Adobe Audience Manager is going to transform the business — are also critical. An effective executive sponsor should guarantee the implementation of Adobe Audience Manager stays in line with the corporate strategy, protecting it from conflicting initiatives or internal politics and helping address any limiting factors, such as resource or budget constraints. The Four Ps of Execute Sponsorship Source: Dykes, Brent. 2011. Web Analytics Action Hero. Adobe Press. Prioritisation To be successful, Adobe Audience Manager needs to be aligned with key business goals. The executive sponsor should provide crucial direction to the team, ensuring the implementation is always in line with the corporate strategy and top priorities. Protection The executive sponsor will play an important role in protecting you, the digital and the implementation from other conflicting initiatives or corporate politics. Problem solving Using their influence within the organisation, the executive sponsor should step in to remove any problems that may impede the success of the implementation, such as resource or budget constraints. Promotion The executive sponsor will play a key role in championing the benefits of Adobe Audience Manager, holding people accountable, and promoting digital wins within the organisation, especially among other executives.
  12. 12. 2.2 Buy-In Achieving management buy-in across your leadership team is also key. Having multiple change agents will help you drive adoption easier and faster. The responsibility for the implementation and deployment of Adobe Audience Manager needs to be shared by the entire leadership team. It is then the executive sponsor’s responsibility to win over the executive team by sharing examples that prove the value of Adobe Audience Manager and digital. Typically this focuses on delivering a better customer experience and subsequent benefits to the business. When implementing digital projects such as Adobe Audience Manager, leaders will be responsible for monitoring different departments and teams owning different parts of digital marketing initiatives. It is critical to make sure that all groups share a common strategy to achieve common goals. Having an internal roadshow to win support from executives will help raise awareness towards aligning all teams and obtaining the necessary resources for an optimal implementation. 2.3 Communication To get the organisation on board, it is always a good idea to share the vision and repeatedly reinforce the reason why your company is investing in Adobe Audience Manager technology by articulating both the customer benefits and business benefits. Sharing documentation such as success case studies of digital implementations will help you validate why and how this investment will take the organisation to a new level. If you want the organisation to embrace digital transformation, it’s important to let employees know it’s a priority. 2.3.1 Communication Management A communication strategy can lay out the foundation and framework for communicating initiatives and objectives across business and technology teams. It can also help by:  Providing guidance and a framework for effective communications within and outside of the project.  Ensuring that proper protocols are always followed when preparing and delivering communication.  Providing precise and concise project communications at the right time. Tip Having cross function stakeholder participation in the vision elicits stakeholder buy-in
  13. 13.  Involving all necessary stakeholders and maintaining regular contact to keep transparency in all transactions.  Having clear communication channels with well-defined roles and responsibilities.  Clarifying doubts, overcoming challenges and averting risks that affect the project.  Building trust and developing open relationships between the parties.  Promoting openness and transparency. 2.3.2 Recommended Communications Process and Principles You can build your communication strategy around the following key principles:  Communication is critical to effect change: Ongoing and timely communication is a fundamental requirement to inform and respond to stakeholders about the change; its impact on them and its outcomes; to enable feedback; to manage expectations; to ensure a smooth change transition; and to support uptake and continual improvement.  Communication delivery is local: Communication from the local area will mean that messages are relayed in a language that is relevant to the audience. Engagement with local communicators across the business and technology will increase the effectiveness of the communication.  Communication is consistent and repetitive: With a common approach across the program, stakeholders will come to expect communication through specific methods (channels), with given formats (look) and timing. Repeating key messages through multiple channels will increase the amount of information that is absorbed.  Communication is linked to the project objectives: Linking the communication to the objectives provides a context and reasoning behind change. Repeatedly providing these links will serve as reminders as to the wider benefits of the project. 2.3.3 Setting Communication Goals All communication developed and distributed throughout the project is intended to achieve the following goals: • Stakeholders and project team members are aware and informed: o Stakeholders and project team members should receive timely information about what is happening (why, when and how and what it means to them). This information starts at a generic level (which is repeated throughout the project lifecycle) and becomes more detailed, specific and targeted to the audience as the project progresses. This information enables stakeholders to think about, understand and be prepared for change and plan for future project streams of work.
  14. 14. • Stakeholders and project team members are engaged: o Opportunities are created and communicated to key stakeholders to support them in exploring, becoming involved in and committing to a new way of doing things, for example:  Different stakeholders and project team members will move through and transition at different rates and times.  Communication will aim to gain key stakeholders and project team members’ commitment through implementation.  Strategies and implementation roadmaps can be developed to manage stakeholders and project team members who are resistant to the change throughout the transition. o Communication is two-way, with stakeholder input and feedback sought and valued at all stages. o Stakeholders and project team members expectations are managed:  The aim of communication is to provide set expectations of strategic initiatives, program or project scope, associated constraints, risks and dependencies, explain why this may differ from expectations (in targeted messages) and to provide ongoing updates on expected and actual outcomes. o Acquisition of skills and knowledge is supported. o Training is backed up by supporting communication to reinforce the training and provide opportunities to share knowledge. 2.3.4 Recommendations On A Communication Approach An approach to communication management for the project may include: o Conduct an effective stakeholder analysis:  Stakeholder analysis is developed at the project board, user group, project team and stakeholder levels.  The stakeholder analysis will focus on all parties (users, management, executives or third parties) required to achieve the desired outcomes and any parties impacted by the change to ensure full coverage. Tip Use a DACI model to categorise stakeholders and their communication needs
  15. 15.  Categorise stakeholders into specific audiences (communication channels). o Identify information requirements of all parties and establish distribution lists by subject area:  Have regular meetings. There should be regular meetings organised with various levels within the project to ensure that there is regular communication.  Where project team meetings do not meet communication requirements (for example, where cross-area representation is required for specific project deliverables) use these sparingly :  One-on-one meetings may be required to obtain specific input or deliver important messages (as required).  A common wiki or alternate online knowledge management solution to provide access to all parties and used by some to provide a workspace.  A shared drive to maintain the main reference point for overview of the project with links to documentation for wide dissemination and feedback.  Electronic newsletter or company-wide communications, providing regular project news (updates, upcoming events, outcomes) delivered by email.  Email may be used for targeted, individual or group communication — with a specific purpose.  Standard templates for communicating regular information such as project status reports, meeting minutes and reports should be used to ensure communication is consistent and repeatable. o Track required message delivery. 2.4 Accountability Your organisation is investing in Adobe Audience Manager and top executives are expecting results. For this to happen, it is the job of the leader and senior stakeholders to hold themselves and their people accountable — employees, teams, partners and most importantly him or herself. Start with changing the perception that accountability is about punishment and hard discipline. It should really be about learning and improvement. To define accountability, you can create a project charter. TIP Think about how your team’s bonuses are measured and if they are being compensated appropriately for project success.
  16. 16. This document states that a project exists, why it is important, who is involved, its timeframes, the expected outcomes and the resources needed for it to be successful. It also gives you written authority to begin work. 2.4.1 Steering Committee Setting up a group of high-level stakeholders and experts will help you achieve the four subcomponents of leadership and, at the same time, set the direction of the project. This steering committee can also help by: • Prioritising initiatives. • Reviewing business cases for new initiatives. • Lobbying for the necessary time, personnel and budget. • Ensuring quality in decision making. • Encouraging a collaborative work environment. • Monitoring progress towards goals. • Controlling scope and resolving conflicts. 2.4.2 Common Roles And Responsibilities Within A Steering Committee The following high-level roles and responsibilities are based on industry-standard practices for steering committees. Role(s) Responsibility Business or Technology Sponsor The sponsor is ultimately accountable for the outcome of the project and is responsible for securing spending authority and resources. • Vocal and visible champion. • Legitimises and lends credibility to the strategic goals and objectives. • Is the escalation point for changes and issues outside the agreed tolerances? • Assists with stakeholder engagement where required. Business Executives The executive’s role is to ensure that the project is focused on achieving its objectives and ensuring a cost-conscious approach, delivering a product that will achieve the forecast benefits, balancing the demands of the business. • Designs and appoints the project management teams. • Oversees the development of the business case, ensuring corporate strategic alignment. • Monitors and controls the progress at a strategic level, in particular reviewing
  17. 17. the business case regularly. • Escalates issues and risks. • Is the escalation point for issues and risks and ensures that any risks associated with the business case are identified, assessed and controlled. • Makes decisions on escalated issues, with particular focus on continued business justification. • Ensures overall business assurance and ensures that the project remains on target to deliver products that will achieve the expected business benefits. Business Owner This role represents the interests of all those who will use the product, including operations and maintenance, those for whom the product will achieve an objective or those who will use the product to deliver the benefits and value drivers.  Provides quality expectations and defines acceptance criteria.  Ensures that the desired outcome is specified.  Ensures that products will deliver the desired outcomes and meet user requirements.  Ensures that the expected benefits are realised.  Provides a statement of actual versus forecast benefits at the benefits reviews.  Resolves user requirements conflicts. Technical Owner This role represents the interests of those designing, developing, facilitating, procuring and implementing the product. This role is accountable for the quality of products delivered by suppliers and is responsible for the technical integrity of the project.  Assesses and confirm the viability of the approach.  Ensures that proposals for designing and developing the products are realistic.  Advises on the selection of design, development and acceptance methods.  Ensures quality procedures are used correctly so that products adhere to requirements. Assurance Owner Assurance covers the primary stakeholder interests of the business, technical staff, end-users and suppliers.  Ensures the right people are planned to be involved in quality inspection at the correct points in the product’s development.  Sees that staff are properly trained in the quality methods.  Ensures that quality methods are being correctly followed.  Makes sure that quality control follow-up actions are dealt with correctly.  Ensures that an acceptable solution is being developed.  Monitors scope creep to ensure that the scope of the project is not changing unnoticed.  Oversees internal and external communications to ensure they are working.
  18. 18.  Ensures applicable standards are being used.  Ensures the needs of specialist interests (for example, security) are being observed. Business assurance responsibilities  Assists to develop the business case and benefits review plan.  Reviews the business case for compliance with corporate standards.  Verifies the business case against external events.  Checks that the business case is being adhered to throughout the project.  Checks that the project remains aligned to the corporate strategy and continues to provide value for money. User assurance responsibilities  Ensures that the specification of users’ needs is accurate, complete and unambiguous.  Assesses whether the solution will meet users’ needs and is progressing towards that target.  Advises on the impact of potential changes from users’ point of view.  Ensures that the quality activities relating to products at all stages has appropriate user representation.  Ensures that quality control procedures are used correctly to ensure that products meet user requirements. Supplier assurance responsibilities  Reviews the product descriptions (features and capabilities) and aligns to delivery.  Advises on the selection of the development strategy, design and methods.  Ensures that any supplier and operating standards defined for the project are met and used to good effect.  Advises on potential changes and their impact on the correctness, completeness and integrity of products against their product description from a supplier perspective.  Assesses whether quality control procedures are used correctly so that products adhere to requirements. Project Manager The project manager has the authority to run the day-to-day operations with the prime responsibility of ensuring that the project produces the required products within the specified tolerances of time, cost, quality, scope, risk and benefits.  Effective project management requires that the project management team, as a whole, possesses and applies the knowledge in several areas: o Project management itself. o Business and industry domain knowledge specific to the project. o Technology knowledge required by the project.
  19. 19. o Interpersonal and communication skills.  The project management framework consists of five key activity groups: Initiation, Planning, Execution, Monitoring and Control and Closing. These are the processes or activities for managing the project and they are different to the project life cycle.  The project life cycle activities are generally sequential while project management activities are performed as below because project management activities may overlap and repeat along the timeline depending on risks (for example, the controlling activities may lead back to planning to revise the project plan as a result of changes). You can also include partners and key vendors as part of the steering committee. Their broad understanding and experience with Adobe Audience Manager technology can positively benefit the outcomes of your Adobe Audience Manager implementation. 2.4.3 Setting Up A Working Group Having a working group with subject-matter experts working below a steering committee will help achieve specified goals. In your Adobe Audience Manager implementation, this working group includes the practitioner leads executing the project. They would meet more regularly and report upwards to the steering committee. The working group should have a weekly discussion where issues and risks are addressed and the status, progress and approach of the project are discussed. 3 Strategy Gaining a clear vision of what it takes to be able to assess and measure your audience management efforts is critical to becoming a high-performing business. “74% of business executives say their company has a business strategy. Only 15% believe that their company has the skills and capabilities to execute on that strategy.” Forrester: Accelerating your digital business, 2013
  20. 20. 3.1 Digital Marketing Maturity Model The first step to craft your digital marketing strategy is to evaluate the level of maturity of your digital marketing landscape. To help you in this endeavour, Adobe has designed a self-assessment tool which indicates the key drivers of success in a digital, data-driven organisation across seven digital marketing dimensions – channels, audiences, context, content, assets, campaigns and data. Digital Marketing Dimensions Channels Channels refers to the various locations and touch points where customers can interact with your brand and how your digital strategy enables social engagement, paid and organic search visibility, email deliverability and site optimisation among other functions. Tip Check the self-assessment tool to assess your organisation’s Digital Marketing maturity.
  21. 21. Audiences Audiences refers to the activities and actions taken to define and target specific customer segments. It also refers to the skillsets necessary to analyse and create segments used for targeting. Context Context refers to the circumstances and events that would comprise a customer’s master marketing profile. Organisations nowadays gain a competitive advantage by leveraging technology to contextualise messaging and reach segments through statistical modelling and data mining which allows you to identify and refine targeting based upon customer touch points. Content Content refers to the asset management, creative workflows and tools needed to publish and optimise digital experiences. It is determined by the activities undertaken to schedule, publish, promote track and monitor the content throughout channels and its performance. Assets Assets refers to having the resources necessary to support the creation and management of digital assets published and used for marketing messages and to meet the organisation’s needs. Campaigns Campaigns refer to the activities and operations to manage the messaging of brand and marketing portfolios to measure performance in addition to having the skills to create a master strategic plan for campaign development and delivery and owning the systems that enables its execution. Data Data refers to the data collection, definition and reporting on the performance of key metrics, performance indicators and goals
  22. 22. INITIATED EMERGED FOCUSED ADVANCED OPTIMISED Channels Simple impression or click tracking. Single or limited used channels. Limited media mix. Engaging with customers in several outbound channels. Ability to start conversation based on customer actions on the Web site and social media channels. Engaging with customers in several outbound and inbound channels. Start relevant conversation based on user activity, segmentations. Several channels are managed in a centralised manner. Activities and behaviours are tracked and analysed. Have a strategic plan for communicating and interacting with customers across channels in real time. Listen, track and react to social activities in real time. Have an attribution model that credits marketing efforts with direct results. Have a strategic plan for communicating and interacting with customers across channels in real time. Target and optimise digital content based on channel and customer interaction point. Marketing spend is automated based on performance. Listen, track and react to social activities in real time. Have an attribution model that credits marketing efforts with direct results. Audiences Basic understanding of customer profiles. Optimisation is done as ideas strike. An optimisation and personalisation roadmap is created. Using audience segment profiles to inform advertising and offers. Optimisation and personalisation roadmap is influenced by a range of stakeholders across the business. Discipline-based testing. Own necessary skills to analyse and create audience segments used for targeting. Ability to leverage targeted customer lists from ad-hoc analysis. Deliver tailored content and experiences to unknown visitors Own necessary skills to analyse and create audience segments used for targeting. Use analytics data to refine and adjust segment definitions. Ability to leverage targeted customer lists from ad-hoc analysis. INITIATED EMERGED FOCUSED ADVANCED OPTIMISED
  23. 23. based on behavioural data, lookalike modelling or third-party data. Deliver tailored content and experiences to unknown visitors based on behavioural data, lookalike modelling or third-party data. Context Basic testing is undertaken to personalise email marketing campaigns and offline material. Own a customer database used for basic personalisation. Access demographic information to deliver basic personalised campaigns. Initial steps on channel targeting. Web site, email communication and advertising channels are being personalised. Cross-site targeting. Leverage segmentation data to personalise basic workflows across various channels. Ability to capture, store and analyse all touch points in the customer journey. Geo-location, demographic and other third-party data sets are integrated with Adobe analytics data and used as traits in the customer profile. Ability to capture, store and analyse all touch points in the customer journey. Ability to tailor experiences based on the customer recent online behaviour. Geo-location, demographic and other third-party data sets are integrated with our analytics data and used as traits in the customer profile. Content Sporadic optimisation activities are done by isolated teams or individuals. All Web site and campaign variations are managed independently. Basic understanding of content effectiveness. Content is integrated with the use of third-party tools. Limited support from IT to allow content flow across campaign channels. There are activities in place to measure content effectiveness for further optimisation. There are testing variables to optimise content. IT and systems established to share content across business units. Own sufficient resources to manage the content necessary to meet the organisation’s needs. Own the marketing technology strategy and defined technology roadmap using assistance from IT/IS as needed. Social content publishing is scheduled and coordinated across the various social networks and performance is included in your Web analytics data. Own sufficient resources to manage the content necessary to meet the organisation’s needs. Own the marketing technology strategy and defined technology road map using assistance from IT/IS as needed. Social content publishing is scheduled and coordinated across the various social networks and performance is included in your Web analytics data. There are strong mechanisms to assess content usage and cleansing.
  24. 24. Assets Limited Ad-hoc inventories and asset classification. One-way syndication of assets. Document and test plans, requirements insights and posts in a shared space. Enterprise repository for digital assets and formal asset lifecycle. Own a searchable central repository for digital asset management that catalogues current and historical assets. Effective communication and production with agencies. Create sufficient assets for effective A/B testing and personalisation. Own a searchable central repository for digital asset management that catalogues current and historical assets. Effective communication and production with agencies. Ability to create and deploy once across multiple channels and devices. Create sufficient assets for effective A/B testing and personalisation. Campaigns Basic customer profiling for marketing tactics. Channels not integrated. Deliver messages and get results in different advertising channels. Create automated responses to customer action in Web sites. Campaigns are mostly reactive. Execute campaigns in various decentralised channels. Capacity to report on key metrics. Campaigns are refined periodically when required. Online and offline channels are employed to deliver marketing messages. Business units work in isolation to produce content and execute marketing campaigns. There are measurement mechanisms in place. Ability to launch and manage campaigns, including analysis to measure campaign performance. Deliver campaigns across multiple online and offline channels. Use an agile, iterative or test-and- learn process in the design, execution and analysis of campaign programs. Ability to launch and manage campaigns, including analysis to measure campaign performance. Ability to alter campaigns based on real-time performance data. Deliver campaigns across multiple online and offline channels. Use an agile, iterative or test-and- learn process in the design, execution and analysis of campaign programs. Data Limited data management strategy. Few business units analyse data. There is a basic data management strategy. Key business units use data to understand customers and crate meaningful decisions. Key stakeholders are knowledgeable on There is a data management strategy in place integrating various first, second and third party data sources. There are mechanisms in place for reporting and decision making. Analytics processes have executive sponsorship and support. Team is knowledgeable and has skillset for analytics and reporting needs. Online and offline data integrated and provide a single Analytics processes have executive sponsorship and support. Team is sufficiently trained and has skillset for analytics and reporting needs. Online and offline data integrated and provide a single
  25. 25. the use of data. Reporting is basic. Some business units work cooperatively towards goal achievement. view of the customer. Data is readily available and used throughout the organisation. Reporting is automated and distributed. view of the customer. Data is readily available and used throughout the organisation. Reporting is automated and distributed. Own data mining tools that allow search through large volumes of data. Analytics program uses statistical modelling to identify trends and predict outcomes. 3.2 Focus Focus means understanding and focusing on the organisation’s key business goals and strategic initiatives to achieve objectives. It is also important to prioritise these goals as well as their scope and timing for completion. As business competitive environments change it’s also important to review your business strategy and goals on a quarterly or bi-annual basis to ensure they remain relevant to the current environment. 3.2.1 Digital Strategy One of the biggest digital challenges organisations face is being able to define what they are trying to achieve through digital channels. In many cases, corporate Web sites aren’t owned by a single manager leading to a mix of different or, even worse, competing interests and purposes. This causes a mixture of counterproductive results. A clear digital strategy enables your digital team to align its activities to the key priorities of your business and succeed as an integral part of your organisation. A key point to consider is that your digital strategy should always be aligned to the overall business goals of the organisation. These are steps you can follow to craft your digital strategy:  Identify all of the key stakeholder groups that have input into your company’s digital approach.  Gather key business objectives from each group separately.  Merge the goals into a set of four to five key objectives.
  26. 26.  Based on your understanding of the corporate strategy, prioritise and rank the list of goals.  In a group meeting, review and refine the goals with key stakeholders. If needed, involve a neutral third party to mediate potential disagreements.  Based on stakeholder feedback, finalise the business objectives and define KPIs to measure these by.  Share an overview of the agreed upon digital strategy with key stakeholders.
  27. 27. A Suggested Digital Strategy Framework Key terminology Enterprise goals: • Strategic business goals and objectives. • Aligned across the business at an enterprise level. • Tied to increased revenue (or decreased costs). • Can include medium to long-term vision of the company. Examples: Increase revenue (by five per cent), expand product line (new line of business), improve customer satisfaction (by five per cent). Digital goals: • Strategic business goals and objectives for your digital channel. • Identify how the digital channel will contribute to achieving the enterprise goals. • There can be more than one digital goal for each enterprise goal.
  28. 28. Examples: Increase online sales (by five per cent), increase online audience (by 10 per cent), increase online customer satisfaction (by five per cent). Below is the Adobe business optimisation for success framework. Defining your business goals is the key first step in this process so it is paramount to have these communicated and agreed upfront. Initiatives: • Strategic digital goals. • Actionable projects. • Relates to digital channel as a whole (not just Web analytics). Examples: reduce shopping cart abandonment, increase mobile content and increase new visitors. Tactics: • Specific actionable online business requirements. • Gaps in achieving online initiatives and goals. • Achievable end goal. Examples: measure shopping cart abandonment, measure application form abandonment and report mobile usage.
  29. 29. Key performance indicator (KPI): Key metric to evaluate business success of digital activities. Example (business objectives and metrics) Business objective Metric 1. $500M in sales through digital channels Revenue 2. Increase brand awareness Visitors 3. Drive deeper and enduring customer relationships Logins Digital Strategy Framework 3.2.2 Key Performance Indicators Focus also includes defining the key performance indicators (KPIs). In digital, these indicators can be metrics such as online revenue or applications, along with associated targets for those metrics (for example, increase application rate by 30%). A common mistake when setting KPIs is selecting random metrics from an industry-related list and expecting they will fit and perform towards achieving your unique business goals. Make sure you always start with understanding your business goals before selecting appropriate KPIs. As you deploy your digital properties using Adobe Social you will be able to use these KPIs to understand the impact changes in content, design and architecture have had as an impact on your business.
  30. 30. What are Key Performance Indicators? Source: Dykes, Brent. 2010. KPIs: Focus on the Special ‘K”. When implementing Adobe Audience Manager, ensure that your KPIs are measured. Do not waste time on non-strategic measures. Ask yourself this: if your CEO was stuck on an island and you could tell him only three things about your business so he would know the business was healthy, what would you tell him? If you said the average time spent on a page was one minute 30 seconds that tells him nothing. If you tell him your campaign generated two million visits to the Web site and the average revenue generated from a specific channel was $2. That is something he will understand as a true measure of business success. There is so much opportunity to measure initiatives and improve on them based on four or five metrics that you can keep yourself busy for months or even years. Don’t fret about measuring every little last detail, you’ll drive yourself crazy and you won’t be supporting your business goals. “Companies with greater digital capabilities were able to convert sales at a rate 2.5 times greater than companies at the lower level did.” McKinsey & Co. March 2015 3.3 Alignment What they are: • Quantifiable, measurable and actionable • Measure factors that are critical to the success of the organisation • Tied to business goals and targets • Limited to 5 to 8 key metrics • Applied consistently throughout the company What they are not: • Metrics that are vague or unclear • “Nice-to-knows” or metrics that are not actionable • Reports (e.g., top search engines, top keywords) • Exhaustive set of metrics • Refutable Tip When creating your KPIs remember the acronym S.M.A.R.T. Performance indicators must be: Specific: to precisely define the goal and it’s expected outcome. Measurable: to be able to understand what success means. Assignable: to individuals or teams Realistic: and yet challenging to drive great results. Time-based: built to drive
  31. 31. Organisations are dynamic: Business strategy changes; leadership changes; Web sites and communications in general are redesigned; the market landscape changes; services and new products are introduced; marketing campaigns are launched; new channels appear; and new competitors are born. All these changes make it difficult for leaders to ensure alignment between the company’s current strategy and the implementation of digital solutions. To make sure there is a proper alignment between your Adobe Audience Manager implementation and your digital strategy, your measurement strategy needs to be dynamic and adjust as changes occur within your business. Having a member from the digital team sitting in the steering committee can ensure that the team knows what is happening within the business and any possible changes in priorities. 3.3.1 Targeting And Personalisation Strategy Your organisation needs to be able to craft and deliver relevant experiences for your audiences to increase your conversion rates, your customer engagement and brand value which therefore will lead to effectively achieving your corporate goals. Data provides you with the means to understand in detail your audiences and segment them. Segmentation allows you to create a targeting schema which allows you to gain a better understanding of how to align your customer’s desires, requirements, needs and expectations along with your organisation’s principles, values and goals, which then empowers you with the ability to deliver truly personalised experiences that your customers will love and your organisation will benefit from. This is the core of what marketing technologies such as Adobe Audience Manager enables you to do. 3.3.1.1 Data Modelling Data modelling is the method by which organisations analyse, define and align the data flow requirements needed to support key business processes. Aligning your data structure with Adobe Audience Manager is key to getting the most value from the solution as it provides marketing and technical users with the means necessary to respond effectively to your organisational targeting and personalisation requirements. This ultimately strengthens the way your clients experience your marketing communications. The consulting team conducts a “data model” workshop to support your organisation in the alignment of your data structure. In this workshop, which is typically conducted for one day, you will be able to understand your organisation’s data needs in addition to the architecture of an efficient data model. Although the process may vary the team usually undertakes your data management strategy in three phases:
  32. 32. 3.3.2 Building Your Segments Understand what your ideal buyer profile would look like and how you can leverage the data that is (or will be) available to create further targeting strategies. The idea behind creating buyers’ profiles is to craft relevant content for each segment group to better understand what type of communication will work best — this is typically achieved through experimentation or advertising platforms which allow you to set testing variables and gather data to see how certain campaigns perform. Some ways you can segment your audiences are as follows: Demographical and firmographic  Job title: By separating key influencers from other stakeholders.  Functional area: Segmenting by department or business unit. For example, human resources and marketing.  Company size: By prioritising, for example, Fortune 500 companies and then medium sized business.  Geographical location: Sales territory, country or region where they operate. Behavioural data  Product interests: Such as the product category your customer is showing interest in.  On-site activities: Such as pages visited, content downloads, research queries and time per visit. 1.Identification •Identify all data that is located in the working environment and is available for use by marketing end- users. •Map how the data flows from external sources and how it will interact within the data lifecycle in Adobe Audience Manager and other business systems. 2.Preparation •Specify the dimensions that determines how the data will be targeted (i.e recipients as opposed to contracts). •Identify filtering and query dimensions that create relationships within data targets (i.e recipients who hold life insurance). •Create the union, exclusion and intersection dimensions to enable you to consolidate and process multiple targets. 3.DataUse •Direct use of (targeting and personalisation) data in outbound deliveries. •Direct use of (targeting and personalisation) data to enrich a data template.
  33. 33.  Off-site activities: Social media interactions (likes, shares, comments), event participation and clicks from advertising campaigns.  Campaign activities: Number of emails opened, links the customer interacted with and other engagement touch points. 3.3.3 Targeting And Personalisation Once you have gained a clear understanding of your audiences (in size, frequency interest, etc.) you have to find an alignment and shape your content structure to appropriately approach them — it is critical that the content in your communication efforts is relevant and contextual for your multiple segment audiences. To achieve this, your organisation can leverage the segmentation criteria established in the previous step to truly deliver relevant content to specific users. You can further enrich the personalisation strategy by integrating other digital data, CRM, transaction, point of sale, fulfilment and call centre data to orchestrate experiences across all your marketing channels in real time. These include online as well as offline channels. Find recommendations on how you can deepen the scope of your audience management strategies in the integrations section. 3.4 Innovation Once your organisation is consistently delivering relevant marketing messages across multiple channels, you will be ready to continue gaining competitive advantage by finding the means to expand the possibilities and generate greater value to your stakeholders. Gather a team of visionary innovators and use the data collected from your ongoing campaigns and digital tactics and empower them to generate new creative ways to improve your consumer’s lifecycle. 4 People 4.1 Expertise Expertise refers to the different skills required by your organisation’s digital and technical staff, business users and senior executives. Not every group will need the same skills, but an overall understanding of how a digital strategy and Adobe Audience Manager will help the organisation is fundamental.
  34. 34. Investing in training is a key activity when implementing new technologies. Make sure you have training programs not only for on boarding new staff, but also for current employees so they can continue growing their expertise over time. Adobe offers a wide range of courses that can help you with your Adobe Audience Manager implementation. These courses are available in multiple formats to suit your needs — at one of Adobe’s regional training centres, online as virtual learning or on-site at your company. To see all Adobe Audience Manager courses go to Adobe Audience Manager Course Catalog. 4.2 Structure A well designed organisational structure will give you and your staff clear guidelines about how the organisation is put together, who they have to report and delegate to and how information flows across different levels. Defining an organisational structure, including roles and responsibilities, before starting with your Adobe Audience Manager implementation will also ensure the project runs efficiently.
  35. 35. 4.2.1 Structures Types Below is a common list of organisational structures we see in digital organisations. Dispersed: This structure is typically an early stage, organic and reactive response to initial staffing and resourcing requirements arising in local or specific departments. While this works well initially, it has limited strategic scalability and can prove problematic in coordinating a top-down strategic vision for the long term structure and direction of digital capability, particularly within a large and diverse organisation. Centralised: Digital marketing roles and capability are centralised into a single area or team. This is typically characterised by a reporting structure through to one head of digital, e- business or e-commerce. Hub and Spoke: A combination of both, typically whereby digital marketing expertise is split - some positioned at the centre looking across the whole organisation and some sat within divisions or departments often acting as a connection point between the CoE and local non-digital teams. ‘Dandelion’ structure: Organisations which have a hub and spoke approach, but across multiple units or divisions. This is usually found in larger corporations that are operationally divided around key audiences (B2B and B2C, for example) that might centralise some key digital capability across the entire corporation, but also could have some hub and spoke arrangements in each of the key divisions. ‘Honeycomb’ structure: One additional structure is the holistic, or ‘honeycomb’, structure, where each employee is empowered with capability. This structure might be interpreted as the equivalent of a fully integrated digital capability where digital expertise and skills are the domain of a broad range of people and roles throughout the organisation. In this scenario no specialist digital roles exist and no single role has digital capability as its sole remit.
  36. 36. 4.2.2 Project-Based Recommended Organisational Structure Management sponsorship: Establish relationships with executives, remove barriers, create a point of escalation, frequently touch base with engagement leads, understand goals and progress of engagements. Enterprise architect Multi-solution engagement lead, aligns all solutions and integrations to business needs and objectives, solidifies and follows through on delivery execution, partners with the project management office (PMO) on timelines and risks, fosters greater teamwork among various solution leads and consultants, delivers on engagement promises, communicates value realisation with consultants, the PMO and AM. Adobe project manager Responsible for positioning, scoping and providing consulting services. This person is in charge of communications between Adobe and the organisation. Product Lead Business Consultant Technical Consultant Business Consultant Technical Consultant Product Lead Business Consultant Technical Consultant Business Consultant Technical Consultant Product Lead Business Consultant Technical Consultant Business Consultant Technical Consultant Solution Lead Business Consultant Technical Consultant Creative Consultant Partner / GDC Management Sponsorship Enterprise Architect (Strategy Owner) Adobe Project Manager (Communication Owner)
  37. 37. Solution lead Assigned to lead engagements for particular solution. Strong collaboration with the EA and other solution leads. Ensures high quality, strategic consulting and successful delivery. May lead out on multi-product engagements if there is no PM or EA. 4.2.3 Business Recommended Organisational Structure Organisations commonly use a centralised model for digital implementations. In this structure, all of the digital resources are centralised into a single area or team often with a reporting structure through to one head of digital, e-business or e-commerce. This is a generic example of an organisational structure and hiring recommendation: The main advantages of having a centralised model are: • Consistency and control: Consistent methods, procedures and terminology. • Governance and focus: Unified commercial entity, strategy and budgets; ease of securing senior management buy-in to digital marketing strategy and projects; and consistent standards, greater efficiency in the allocation of resources, ease of project prioritisation across the organisation. Hiring phase 1 (0-6 Months) Hiring phase 2 (6 - 12 Months) Hiring phase 3 (12 – 18 Months) TIP The above model will need to be right-sized for your business depending on its size, structure and geographical nature.
  38. 38. • Scalability and support: The application of digital expertise to support the wider business and clarity on where to go for support and advice. 4.2.4 Roles And Responsibilities 4.2.4.1 In A Centralised Model Here are suggested responsibilities for each of the roles described above. Director of Digital • Director of digital analytics, marketing analysis, CRM or business intelligence. • Position of authority to influence others. • Key point of contact for executives, business owners and analysts. • Focuses on corporate-level issues, but maintains visibility into regional or business unit issues. • Works closely with executive sponsors to drive value from analytics across the organisation. • Drives cultural change and product adoption within the organisation via user education and other interactions. • Manages the core team and commercial relationships with analytics vendors. Head of Strategy • Drives and owns the digital strategy roadmap. • Coordinates ongoing strategy workshops with stakeholders. • Ensures the business is continually focused and aligned with business objectives. • Determines the priority of new implementation projects. • Drives the digital steering committee, not just a “Web analytics” steering committee. • Manages the business analyst and project management resources. Head of Optimisation • Owns the testing roadmap. • Drives the personalisation targeting strategy. • Works collaboratively with the senior analytics team on supporting analytics optimisation actions through testing. • Manages the testing resources. • Manages ongoing relationships with testing product vendors. • Coordinates with the head of implementation on testing implementation needs.
  39. 39. Head of Analytics • Focused on overall digital performance with Web analytics being the barometer of that performance. • Runs regular, recurring meetings (weekly or monthly) with stakeholders on digital channel performance. • Establishes enterprise-wide standards. • Manages ongoing relationships with analytics vendors. Head of Implementation • Owns the analytics solutions design architecture. • Key point of contact for technical aspects of Web analytics for one or more business units. • Works collaboratively with the core team on enhancements. • Manages the implementation resources. • Manages ongoing relationship with internal integration teams. Business Requirements Specialist • Defines prioritised projects. • Runs workshops to gather business analytics implementation reporting requirements. • Develops the business requirements document for each project. • Gathers business sign-off. • Works collaboratively with the core team on requirements gathering enhancements and documenting the process. • Acts as project manager. Targeting Lead • Drives the testing roadmap. • Owns the key and complex testing campaign initiatives. • Key point of contact for testing technical aspects. • Owns the testing deployment and QA process and manages ongoing data accuracy. • Mentors the testing specialists. Digital Analyst Lead • Focused on measuring business unit key performance indicators (KPIs) and optimising business units online. • Owns the analytical reporting requests log. • Single point of contact for end-users within business units and understands end-users’ changing needs. • Validates data collection for business units.
  40. 40. • Meets with business unit reporting owners and the core team on a regular basis (monthly). • Informs the core team of business unit activity and champions its needs to the core team. • Coordinates QA efforts and manages ongoing data accuracy. Digital Implementation Lead • Drives the testing roadmap • Owns the key and complex implementation initiatives. • Key point of contact for technical aspects. • Owns the testing, deployment and QA process. • Mentors the implementation resources. • Owns the testing deployment and QA process. • Maintains a library of implementation documentation and shares knowledge within the organisation. • Active, not passive, participants in the deployment enhancement process. Content Strategist • Drives the content strategy. • Owns the content delivery roadmap. • Manages the content delivery team. Technical Requirements Specialist • Defines prioritised projects. • Runs workshops to gather technical requirements and identify risks. • Develops the technical documents and deployment plan for each project. • Gathers sign-off. • Works collaboratively with core team on requirements gathering enhancements and documenting the process. Targeting Specialist • Owns the testing and targeting campaign initiatives. • Gathers the individual campaign objectives and requirements. • Coordinates implementation campaign needs with the targeting lead. • Key point of contact for individual campaigns. • Delivers the individual campaign reporting and analytical insight.
  41. 41. Digital Analyst Specialist • Gathers analysis requirements from the business. • Delivers reporting requirements analysis, insight and actions. • Presents analysis back to the report owner. Digital Implementation Specialist • Drives individual implementation projects. • Coordinates with internal and external development resources on implementation requirements. • Creates the individual project technical specification documents. • Provides assistance on deployment and testing. • May be assigned to a specific business unit. Content Producer • Maintain communication among cross-functional teams. • Owns the process for creating, enforcing and managing the content production plan. • Collaborate with all departments to define and manage goals, scope, specific deliverables and scheduling needs. • Aggregate and distil input from all areas of the organisation and develop the best approach for incorporating feedback into project executions. • Contribute to strategic thinking around content models that adapt, scale and expand over time and distribution platforms. Project Manager • Outsourced initially and then established as a FTE. • Responsible for costing, estimating and planning projects. • Prepares project initiation documentation (PID). • Responsible for ensuring best value is obtained for the project including from the supplier base and use of internal and external resources. • Maintaining and completing project KPIs. • Writing detailed and summarised project progress reports. • Identifying, costing and processing any contract variations. • Tracking activities against the detailed project plans. Creative & UX Designer • Conceptualise and create design content for all campaign testing and targeting experiences. • Test concepts, perform task and user analysis and assist with user acceptance testing. • Develop prototypes that succinctly illustrate hierarchy and navigation.
  42. 42. • Strategise and drive interactive product development from site map to launch. • Create compelling online consumer experience that drive business results. • Possess knowledge of prototyping and wireframe creation tools. Channel Analyst • Specialises in a particular channel: SEO, SEM, display, social, affiliate, etc. • Understands online strategy and how this breaks down into multi-channel Web marketing elements. • Expert knowledge of key analytics tools and the ability to setup advanced tracking and reporting mechanisms and capture key metrics. • Monitor and analyse Web related data “across the board” and analyses key metrics. • Understand how different elements of Web strategy relate to, and complement, each other (e.g. organic search engine optimisation, social media PPC) and create metrics to monitor and measure this. • Real-time, daily and weekly campaign performance reporting. Presentation of key data and conclusions to management. Mobile Implementation Analyst • Drives individual implementation projects around mobile. • Coordinates with internal and external development resources on implementation requirements. • Creates the individual project technical specification documents. • Provides assistance on deployment and testing. • May be assigned to a specific business unit. Mobile Content Specialist • Maintain communication among cross-functional teams. • Own the process for creating, enforcing and managing the content production plan for mobile. • Collaborate with all departments to define and manage goals, scope, specific deliverables and scheduling needs. • Aggregate and distil input from all areas of the organisation and develop the best approach for incorporating feedback into project executions. • Contribute to strategic thinking around content models that adapt, scale and expand over time and distribution platforms. Head of Social  Solution expert.  Maintain communications among cross-functional teams to execute on social media campaigns.  Drives the implementation of social media projects.
  43. 43.  Identifies opportunities for expansion.  Responsible for reporting on the performance of social media channels. Publishing Lead  Responsible for the execution of content across social media channels.  Ensures internal workflows deliver the content and social media strategy.  Ensures tracking mechanisms have been implemented appropriately. Monitoring and Moderating Lead  Represents the organisation across multiple channels.  Maintains the wellbeing of the communities.  Provide support to the communities when required. Listening and Analytics Lead  Responsible for the monitoring of several social media channels to analyse the channel sentiments.  Measures channel performance in terms of key business goals.  Measures channel sentiment and provides immediate feedback when required. 4.2.4.2 Key Teams And Roles Business users: Product owners and input providers • Provide overall business strategy and goals for products. • Develop key messaging and customer segmentation strategy for online sales. • Not involved in day-to-day management of the Web site. Marketing: Brand awareness and site management • Develop strategy for product marketing across all channels, including Adobe.com. • Drives day-to-day site marketing (content changes, testing, etc.) activities. • Provides market research and analytic support for site management. • Partner with sales to deliver online revenue. Sales: Online revenue and e-commerce business strategy • Own strategy and execution for all e-commerce related aspects of the site. • Develop growth plans and deliver to business objectives. • Partners with marketing on delivering online revenue.
  44. 44. IT: Implementation and Delivery • Delivery support to site strategies and objectives. • Develop technical strategy to deliver business vision. • Partners with marketing product owners to enhance platform framework with new templates, components and capabilities. 4.3 Resources You will need to decide the right balance and allocation of internal staff and external consultants. This will be determined by your organisation’s previous experience with digital implementations — less experienced organisations may require more help from consultants. Internally speaking, your organisation will need to implement a talent strategy to determine how best to hire and retain digital and analytic talent. “Having the right talent and sufficient resources on your digital team is crucial to your long-term, data-driven success.” Brent Dykes – Adobe 4.3.1 Resource Model To get the most out of Adobe Audience Manager and to deliver a better digital experience to your customers, you need to get the most out of your implementation. Investing in external resources will help you optimise your investment, mitigate project risk and identify new opportunities. 4.3.1.1 Adobe Consulting And Partners Organisations are facing a deficit of digital marketing expertise and Adobe consulting and partners can play a critical role in making Adobe Audience Manager operational within your business — implementing it, running and operating the solution and realising value through business optimisation. Based on your resources and project scope, working with Adobe consulting and partners can help you in many different ways: from developing your customer journey, creative and user experience to building your content strategy, defining your workflow processes, training and enablement, building your page template and components, making necessary customisations to the implementation, integrating with other technology platforms and providing general guidance on how to use the solution.
  45. 45. Roles and responsibilities, critical success factors, post implementation review and sales alignment. 4.4 Community It is key to encourage the creation of a digital community within your organisation. Invest in creating an environment where all members can learn from each other and share experiences,
  46. 46. ideas, best practices and campaign wins. When you have distributed analysts and business users across different business units and countries, the digital marketing community provides valuable support to new users as well as opportunities for more advanced users to share their collective knowledge. This is especially important in traditional businesses where upskilling traditional skillsets with digital ones is vital. It can be a useful forum in which to educate the traditionally minded people within your business. Community can be fostered in a number of different ways, such as a simple email distribution list, internal wiki, corporate chat groups and workshops. 4.5 Culture Adopting marketing technologies influence a great number business processes and practices changing the nature of how teams work to achieve common goals. Despite the fact that your organisation has invested in Adobe Audience Manager, some leaders and employees may still have doubts about the benefits of the solution. They probably do not fully understand what audience segmentation and targeting, social media marketing, display advertising, analytics, automation, content management, user experience and other components of digital bring to the table. This is common in a business world that is still adapting and changing to digital. The first step is to have a clear vision for your culture as well as having the right mindset to shift activities and thinking within your digital organisation. Second, involve key stakeholders and share that vision of that future across the organisation. One of the main reasons why organisations fear change is because they have little or no information about where the change is taking them. Third, invest in individuals who embrace opportunities and are the right cultural fit. These will find it easily to work in teams and emerge in more complex problem solving situations. Additionally, C-level executives can leverage two basic steps to embed a new way of thinking into business operations regardless of the scale of the organisation. These steps fall into two categories:  The formal levers: These are adoption and adaptation of processes and structures such as leadership policies, role definitions and people processes to support digitalisation. These stakeholders will be responsible for the introduction of new digital channels into traditional operations.  The informal levers: These relate to the key behaviours, role models and networks that help employees set a mindset aligned to the cultural structure of your organisation.
  47. 47. The following are the common traits in a digital organisation1 : 5 Process In this section of the document, you will find the information to effectively deploy and use Adobe Audience Manager. There are four main types of processes: deployment, usage, sustainability and change management. 5.1 Deployment Adobe Audience Manager implementations are consultative engagements that focus on data collection and aggregation strategy, audience profile planning and targeting consultation. The implementation methodology has been standardised by your assigned Adobe Audience Manager consultant, who will guide you through a code deployment and configuration process with consultation around data collection and audience strategy. The transition from implementation to launch is designed to be seamless as the teams 1 Adapted from: Strategy&, 2013, ‘Building a Digital Culture: How to meet the challenge of multichannel digitalisation’, p. 10. Customers and demand • Pulls ideas from the market • Driven by demand Organisation •Flat Hierarchy •Rapid decision making •Result and product orientation •Empower employees to find ways to achieve goals Work Environment • Understand needs of digital customers • Driven by innovation, improvement and overcoming constraints • Cross-functional teams • Rapid, unpredictable career progression • Focus on rapid learn and launch Tip Depending on the service associated to your account, the Adobe Audience Management team will conduct periodical account monitoring to help you leverage the usage of your solution. Ask your account manager for more information.
  48. 48. work together to help your organisation define and develop the qualitative and quantitative metrics to measure the success of your accounts. Getting started with Adobe Audience Manager can take approximately six weeks to three months, depending on your data collection needs. Our implementation techniques help create a consultative partnership with new clients. This process is designed to:  Discover and understand your business requirements.  Produce an actionable plan to address those demands.  Develop custom solutions to help meet unique requirements or use cases.  Ensure that your proprietary data is imported and made available in Adobe Audience Manager. Our partner solutions and account management teams will work closely with you before, during and after the implementation process. 5.1.1 Implementation Methodology Before the implementation project kicks-off, it is key to have a well-defined success criteria for the program (refer to the S.M.A.R.T KPIs outlined in the strategy section), a comprehensive change management and communication plan and be committed to the ongoing training Adobe will provide during the implementation. Adobe provides optional post-deployment resources for further upskilling in the Adobe Marketing Cloud solutions.
  49. 49. 5.1.1.1 Define Phase This phase is designed to help customers to define and agree on project scope, understand custom requirements, establish milestones and setup communication. DEFINE DISCOVERY BUILD, TEST & TRAIN LAUNCH, SUPPORT & OPTIMISE CODE IMPLEMENTATION Key Activities Kick off meeting Introduce project leads Provide access Status reports and project team calls Participants Business teams Technical team Deliverables Documents identifying roles and responsiblities Processes to share resources and acces Scope of work A plan to schedule project meeting and calls
  50. 50. 5.1.1.2 Discovery Phase The discovery phase is dedicated to gathering requirements, conducting research and working toward a deeper understanding of your business needs and data collection strategies. The following table describes key activities that take place during this phase: DEFINE DISCOVERY BUILD, TEST & TRAIN LAUNCH, SUPPORT & OPTIMISE CODE IMPLEMENTATION Key Activities Requirements and goal setting Brekout sessions Discover sources of your first- party, second- party and third- party data Follow-up communications Develop plans for tag management and data collection Participants Business teams Technical team Deliverables A completed first-party, second-party, and third-party data collection strategy A completed data taxonomy A developed third-party data integration plan A completed CRM or data warehouse ingestion plan Defined audience- segmentation requirements
  51. 51. 5.1.1.3 Build, Test And Display During the build, test and train phase, you will review the data collection strategy and prototype with a designated partner solutions lead. Your data collection strategy will undergo end-to-end QA testing. Partner solutions will track discovered bugs and coordinate problem resolutions with Adobe systems engineers. Customer training can start in parallel with these other efforts. The following table describes key activities that take place during this phase: DEFINE DISCOVERY BUILD, TEST AND TRAIN LAUNCH, SUPPORT AND OPTIMISE CODE IMPLEMENTATION Key Activities Enable third-party data provider integration. And perform cross- browser compability testing Create instance in Adobe Tag Manager and provide log-in information Onboarding of CRM and other data sources Load data and segment storage Create initial batch of segments, audiences for the segmentation plan First-party data collection, Traffic Adobe Tag Manager onto first- party pages Build reporting methods based on gaps and custom reporting requirements, create relevant custom queries Environment provisioning Key Participants Business teams Technical teams Deliverables A completed and accepted data- collection plan End-to-end QA testing Acceptance and sign off Basic instruction on AAM user interface features
  52. 52. 5.1.1.4 Launch, Support And Optimise Phase During the launch, support and optimise phase, your data collection and prototyped implementation moves from development to a live production environment. We’ll continue training on product familiarisation and strategies that can help increase your ROI through data- driven optimisation. The following table describes key activities that take place during this phase: 5.1.1.5 Code Implementation Though the deployment process may seem complex, the code implementation is as simple as adding a few lines of JavaScript adjacent to the closing </body> tag of your Web site. Deployment The Adobe Audience Manager code snippet calls Akamai to download the business rules set up previously in the user interface. Furthermore, client browsers cache this information, which DEFINE DISCOVERY BUILD, TEST AND TRAIN LAUNCH, SUPPORT AND OPTIMISE CODE IMPLEMENTATION Key Activities Data analysis and optimisation Further training Create traits and segments Follow-up communications Deliverables Generating and interpecting report data How to get product support Depending familiarity with AAM Understanding custom reports Responding to, or soliciting, feature requests, bugs, and user feedback
  53. 53. helps reduce page and server load times. Our code and data collection methodology is designed to maintain the user experience across your inventory. Participants Adobe partner solutions can work directly with your technical teams to help deploy code, address final concerns and fulfil other requirements. 5.1.2 Data Integration Methods Adobe Audience Manager exchanges visitor information with other data providers by either of the following methods:  Real-time: Transfers data immediately as a user visits your site. This method is also known as a synchronous integration.  Batch (server-to-server): Transfers data between servers on a set schedule after a visitor has left the page. This method is also known as an out-of-band, or asynchronous, integration. Choosing the right integration method depends on a combination of business requirements and the technical capabilities of your data partner. 5.1.2.1 How To Choose A Data Delivery Method Describes technical and business reasons for sending data via synchronous (real-time) or asynchronous (server-to-server) methodologies. Selecting a data delivery type Technical considerations: Data delivery depends on the technical capabilities of the data partner. Adobe Audience Manager can send and receive data in real-time from the browser or by batch updates through offline, server-to-server communication processes. Business considerations: The business reasons for selecting one delivery method or another depend on the technical capabilities of your destination partner and how you want to use this data. Typically, synchronous data transfers are useful when you need to take action on user data immediately. Asynchronous data transfers may be useful when immediate action is not required and when you have time to build deeper user profiles for later use.
  54. 54. 5.1.2.2 Real Time Server-To-Server Integration A real-time server-to-server data integration rapidly synchronises user data between Adobe Audience Manager servers and another targeting system. In most cases, data exchange takes place within seconds or minutes, depending on the refresh rate of the targeting system. Note, however, the targeted system determines this refresh interval, not Adobe Audience Manager. Furthermore, the refresh rate can vary between different systems. A real-time, server-to-server integration is the preferred integration type for data exchanges. Adobe Audience Manager uses this method whenever targeting partners can support it. Advantages:  Allows you to qualify users for segments without seeing them again on the page, in a video player, etc.  Reduces the number of HTTP calls from the page. Fewer calls helps preserve the user experience.  Helps with time sensitive targeting so you can take action on a qualified user quickly.  Useful when moving to a DSP for offsite targeting. Disadvantages:  Less useful for onsite targeting when you need to target the user on the same page, or the next page, based on qualifying a user for that segment. 5.1.2.3 Server-To-Server Batch Integration A server-to-server batch integration bundles data and sends it to other systems at set intervals rather than in near real time. Data transfer intervals can range from two to 24 hours. Some data providers support this integration type only. However, we've seen a general trend away from batch integrations towards real-time integration methodologies. Advantages:  Allows you to qualify users for segments without seeing them again on the page, in a video player, etc.  Useful for targeting that is not time sensitive. Disadvantages:  The synchronisation interval can delay targeting against the most current data. 5.1.2.4 Real Time Calls Real-time calls exchange data with Adobe Audience Manager immediately, as a user visits your site or takes action on the page. With this method, targeting systems get the most updated
  55. 55. segment qualification data and can take that information into account during a content or ad delivery decision. Also, this process works with publisher ad servers where we update qualified segments to a first-party cookie that is read into an ad call as key-value pairs. Currently, Adobe Audience Manager uses real-time calls to integrate with Target, Adobe Primetime and other content management systems. Future developments include making these calls between servers rather than directly from the page. For example, Adobe Target could make a single request for a new content area and then message Adobe Audience Manager via server-to-server protocols. This helps reduce calls made to the page. However, this process is in a proof-of-concept phase only. A production release has not been scheduled. Furthermore, most external systems do not support this type of server-side call, although Audience Manager can support it now. Advantages:  Allows you to target the next page, content area, or ad impression based the most recent segment qualification. Disadvantages:  Adds a call to Adobe Audience Manager from the page. 5.1.2.5 Pixels Syncs To Targeting Systems Pixel synchronisation maps segments to pixels on the page. The pixel fires and transmits data when a user qualifies for a particular segment. Pixel synchronisation is a rudimentary and unreliable data transfer mechanism. Top tier data providers and systems rarely use it. Advantages:  Real-time data transfers. Disadvantages:  Can add a lot of client-side calls from the page.  Unreliable for data transmission (5% to 20% loss is normal). 5.2 Usage Usage is all about establishing and leveraging best practices that will help you with your overall reporting, analysis and decision making. Understanding how your organisation uses the solution becomes important because it will help you maximise your investment. Here are a few questions you will need to consider:  How will you manage time and resources spent on reporting and deep-dive analysis?  If your analysts are going to be overloaded with reporting and analysis requests each week, what tools and workflows do you need to implement to help them prioritise those requests?
  56. 56. 5.2.1 Administration As a solution in the Adobe Marketing Cloud, Adobe Audience Manager permissions are granted at two levels: at the marketing cloud level and at the Audience Manager level. Adobe Marketing Cloud permissions govern access to Adobe Audience Manager and can be used to restrict visibility to individual report suites and their connected data. The options under the administration menu let you create Adobe Audience Manager users and assign them to groups. You can also view limits (traits, segments, destinations and AlgoModel). Enterprise customers using Audience Manager need one data management platform for all of their data, but must be able to control the visibility of the different data elements to specific business units. You can accomplish this using group permissions. Audience Manager uses groups to assign permissions. Permissions are not assigned at the user level. Group permissions are tied to objects (traits, segments, etc.) and to actions you can perform on those objects (edit, view, etc.).  Create users: Create users in Adobe Audience Manager and specify user details, login status and assign users to groups.  Create a group: A group is a collection of users that share access rights to destination, segment trait objects. You can limit groups to single objects only or give them broad access to combinations of different objects.  Edit your account settings: Non-admin users can edit their own profiles, including changing their email addresses and resetting their passwords. 5.2.2 Access Levels The following matrix illustrates the different access permissions that Adobe Audience Manager can assign to user groups: TRAITS SEGMENTS MODELS DESTINATIONS DERIVED SIGNALS TAGS Available roles Available roles Available roles Available roles Available roles Available roles View traits View segments View models View destinations View derived signals View tags Create traits Create segments Create models Create destinations Create derived signals Edit traits Edit segments Edit models Edit destinations Edit derived signals
  57. 57. Delete traits Delete segments Delete models Delete destinations Delete derived signals Available permissions Available permissions Available permissions Available permissions : 1. Data provider permissions 1. Data provider permissions 1. Data provider permissions 1. Individual destination permissions Read Read Read Read Write Write Write Write Create Create Create Delete Delete Delete Delete 1. Wild card permissions Map to segments Map to models View all destinations Map to models Edit all destinations Create algo trait Delete all destinations 1. Wild card permissions 1. Wild card permissions 1. Wild card permissions View all traits View all segments View all models Create all traits Create all segments Create all models Edit all traits Edit all segments Edit all models Delete all traits Delete all segments Delete all models Map all to segments There is no wild card permission for map to model as that is handled by model wild cards. There is no wild card permission for map to model as that is handled by model wild cards Create permission is not needed. Permission is based on user role. There are no permissions on derived signals. Permission is based on user role. There are no permissions on tags.

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