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Making Lesson Plans
Calculus Instructors
Orientation
September 13, 2005
Matthew Leingang
Copyright ©2005 The President and...
Introduction
We need to cover the section on the
product rule.
Students hate the product rule
What to do?
This “proble...
Why plan lessons? (apologies
to Andy Engelward)
PPPPPPP
Proper Planning and Preparation Prevent
Pretty Poor Performance!...
Lesson Styles
Theorem-oriented
Definition
Theorem
Proof
Example
QuickTime™ and a
TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor
are...
Lesson Styles (continued)
 Problem-oriented
 Example
 Example
 Definition
 Theorem
 Proof?
 Example
 Example
 Exa...
Basic Lesson Planning
Start with the end
“Students will be able to” (SWBAT) points
Context, Big Picture
Assessment
What class activities wil...
Sample Goals
“Understand the interplay between
logarithms and exponentials”
(conceptual)
“Use the product rule to take
d...
Then go to the beginning
Introductory Example (Hatsumon)
here’s a problem you can’t do now, but
will be able to do at th...
Anticipating Questions
What will students
find difficult?
What examples will
illustrate and
illuminate?
Practice and
ex...
End with the middle
Fill in the big idea
Proof?
Use your knowledge of students
backgrounds to fill in your examples.
Choosing Examples Wisely
 Vary degrees of simplicity
and complexity
 Try to find ways to involve
students
 Choose them ...
Scripting your Lesson
Consider writing out
some parts verbatim
Important diagrams
can be practiced
ahead of time
Depend...
Time Management
Know how much of
your notes
corresponds to how
much class time
Put a timeline in
your lessons
“accordio...
Methods (aka Choreography)
Group Work
Breaking up
students
Preparing
worksheets
Big problems/small
problems
QuickTime™ and a
TIFF (Uncompressed) d...
Student Board Work
Work out an example
Races
Polling/Discussion organizing
Informal
PRS
Get students to talk
to each otherQuickTime™ and a
TIFF (Uncompressed) decom...
Transitions
Moving from one thing to the next
Simple Summary
Not necessarily delivered by you!
Breakouts: Develop a Lesson
for your class
Debriefing
Discuss
What ideas did you hear that you
hadn’t thought of?
What principles of lesson planning did
you take away?
Assignment
Think about your lesson in the next
couple of days
Fill in the rest
Meet in your group and share
Postmortem
Assess your Class!
Analyze
What went right
What went wrong
What you’d do next
time
Keep for posterity
Qui...
Cheats and Hacks
Look in (different)
textbook
Reuse old lesson
plans
“Borrow” someone
else’s lesson plan
Collaborate o...
Closing Remarks
PPPPPPP
Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny
The more you teach, the smarter you
get, but students stay the...
References
First Day to Final Grade: A Graduate
Student’s Guide to Teaching (Curzan,
Damour)
Learning to Teach and Teach...
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Making Lesson Plans

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Slides from a talk on lesson planning I gave for a calculus instructors orientation ten years ago.

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Making Lesson Plans

  1. 1. Making Lesson Plans Calculus Instructors Orientation September 13, 2005 Matthew Leingang Copyright ©2005 The President and Fellows of Harvard College
  2. 2. Introduction We need to cover the section on the product rule. Students hate the product rule What to do? This “problem” exists for every topic of every course
  3. 3. Why plan lessons? (apologies to Andy Engelward) PPPPPPP Proper Planning and Preparation Prevent Pretty Poor Performance! Be an effective teacher Make yourself look smart
  4. 4. Lesson Styles Theorem-oriented Definition Theorem Proof Example QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  5. 5. Lesson Styles (continued)  Problem-oriented  Example  Example  Definition  Theorem  Proof?  Example  Example  Example (repeat as necessary) QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  6. 6. Basic Lesson Planning
  7. 7. Start with the end “Students will be able to” (SWBAT) points Context, Big Picture Assessment What class activities will determine if you have met your goals? What homework problems are going to be assigned after this class?
  8. 8. Sample Goals “Understand the interplay between logarithms and exponentials” (conceptual) “Use the product rule to take derivatives of elementary functions” (technical) “Recognize when to use logarithmic differentiation” (strategic)
  9. 9. Then go to the beginning Introductory Example (Hatsumon) here’s a problem you can’t do now, but will be able to do at the end of the class Big Question that you plan to answer
  10. 10. Anticipating Questions What will students find difficult? What examples will illustrate and illuminate? Practice and experience will improve this skill
  11. 11. End with the middle Fill in the big idea Proof? Use your knowledge of students backgrounds to fill in your examples.
  12. 12. Choosing Examples Wisely  Vary degrees of simplicity and complexity  Try to find ways to involve students  Choose them to be interesting to them  Consider alternatives to you doing them at the board  Work them out ahead of time!!  Make sure they’re not too complicated  Make sure they illustrate your point
  13. 13. Scripting your Lesson Consider writing out some parts verbatim Important diagrams can be practiced ahead of time Depends on experience and language skills QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  14. 14. Time Management Know how much of your notes corresponds to how much class time Put a timeline in your lessons “accordion” sections QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  15. 15. Methods (aka Choreography)
  16. 16. Group Work Breaking up students Preparing worksheets Big problems/small problems QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  17. 17. Student Board Work Work out an example Races
  18. 18. Polling/Discussion organizing Informal PRS Get students to talk to each otherQuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  19. 19. Transitions Moving from one thing to the next Simple Summary Not necessarily delivered by you!
  20. 20. Breakouts: Develop a Lesson for your class
  21. 21. Debriefing
  22. 22. Discuss What ideas did you hear that you hadn’t thought of? What principles of lesson planning did you take away?
  23. 23. Assignment Think about your lesson in the next couple of days Fill in the rest Meet in your group and share
  24. 24. Postmortem Assess your Class! Analyze What went right What went wrong What you’d do next time Keep for posterity QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  25. 25. Cheats and Hacks Look in (different) textbook Reuse old lesson plans “Borrow” someone else’s lesson plan Collaborate on lesson plans Lesson Study QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  26. 26. Closing Remarks PPPPPPP Ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny The more you teach, the smarter you get, but students stay the same!
  27. 27. References First Day to Final Grade: A Graduate Student’s Guide to Teaching (Curzan, Damour) Learning to Teach and Teaching to Learn Mathematics: Resources for Professional Development (Delong, Winter) How to Teach Mathematics (Krantz)

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