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Ngo sector of bangladesh

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Ngo sector of bangladesh

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Published on 4 April 2020
Published by - Md.Mehedi Hasan
European University of Bangladesh
Topic : NGO Sector of Bangladesh

Here describe NGO Sector of Bangladesh, Overview, future of the ngo sector, problem of the ngo sector, Recommendation, Conclusion
Thank you

Published on 4 April 2020
Published by - Md.Mehedi Hasan
European University of Bangladesh
Topic : NGO Sector of Bangladesh

Here describe NGO Sector of Bangladesh, Overview, future of the ngo sector, problem of the ngo sector, Recommendation, Conclusion
Thank you

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Ngo sector of bangladesh

  1. 1. WELCOME TO OUR PRESENTATION NGO Sector of Bangladesh Prepared By -: Prepared For :- Mushfeka Binte Kamal Senior Lecturer Faculty, Department of BBA Course Name: Introduction to Business & Environment Course code: BBA 102 Md.Mehedi Hasan 200101053 Date of Submit : 29.03.2020
  2. 2. Since the independence of Bangladesh in 1971, the state has largely failed to assist the poor or reduce poverty, while NGOs have grown dramatically, ostensibly to fill this gap. There are more and bigger NGOs here than in any other country of equivalent size. The Association of Development Agencies in Bangladesh (ADAB) had a total membership of 886 NGOs/PVDOs (Private Voluntary Development Organisations) in December 1997, of which 231 were central and 655 chapter (local) members (ADAB, 1998). The ADAB Directory lists 1007 NGOs, including 376 non-member NGOs. The NGO Affairs Bureau of the Government of Bangladesh (GOB), which has to approve all foreign grants to NGOs working in Bangladesh, released grants worth about $250 million US dollars in FY 1996-97 to 1,132 NGOs, of which 997 are local and 135 are foreign (NGO Affairs Bureau, 1998). NGOs have mainly functioned to service the needs of the landless, usually assisted by foreign donor funding as a counterpoint to the state’s efforts (Lewis, 1993). Some NGOs have shown success in providing services like education, health and microfinance to their clients and promoting human rights- particularly women’s rights. This has been accompanied by backlash from the local elite, religious leaders and organisations (Rafi and Chowdhury, 2000; Shehabuddin, 1999). NGOs in Bangladesh have not originated from Grass Roots Organisations (GROs) in civil society. Rather, it is NGO workers who set up groups, which clients then join to get microcredit and other services. Most Bangladeshi NGOs are totally dependent upon foreign funds. The volume of foreign funds to NGOs in Bangladesh has been increasing over the years and stood at just under 18 percent of all foreign “aid” to the country in FY 1995-96. Donors increased their funding from 464 NGO projects in 1990-91 to 746 in 1996-97, a 60 per cent increase in six years; the total amount disbursed showed a 143 per cent increase over the period (NGO Affairs Bureau, 1998). However, the disbursement of funds to NGOs is highly skewed. The top 15 NGOs accounted for 84 per cent of all allocation to NGOS in 1991-92, and 70 percent in 1992-93 (Hashemi, 1995). NGO dependence on donor grants has kept the whole operation highly subsidised by foreign capital. For example, the annual working costs of BRAC’s (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee, one of the largest NGOs in Bangladesh) branch-level units are still more than three times their locally generated income (Montgomery et al., 1996).
  3. 3. Over the past two decades Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) have taken center stage all over the world in matters pertaining to good governance, functioning of democracy, and upholding of human rights and fundamental freedoms. They have also been at the forefront in the fight against corruption, political partisanship and abuse of familial connections. Some NGOs have grown an international character and their representations are present in many countries of the world. Some of them, like Bangladesh's "Grameen Bank," or United Kingdom's "Amnesty International" or France's "Medicines sans Frontier," have gained international acceptance, respect and recognition. Their efforts have been mostly voluntary and have been facilitated through conviction and sincerity of purpose. They have helped in poverty reduction, in gender empowerment, in greater access to healthcare, in the creation of alternative avenues of employment and in the removing of the curse of illiteracy. In Bangladesh, since the early seventies, NGOs have played a pivotal role. Over the years, they have supplemented the role of the government and helped in opening doors and windows all over the country, particularly in the vast rural hinterland. We have seen how the concept of micro-credit has strengthened credit extension potential for rural women and created self-employment opportunities. It has also assisted in the growth of micro agro-based units (horticulture), small-scale pisciculture in small water bodies, and poultry farming. It has helped to empower women and fostered girl child education. Similarly, certain NGOs have been remarkably successful in the spread of non-formal education and vocational training. This has helped in the growth of skill within the population. NGOs have been the source of hope. They have also been the cause of great frustration. Unplanned growth in this sector has led to duplication of efforts and, sometimes, abuse of resources. Moral integrity and fiscal probity have been sacrificed in the quest for funds and resources that are made available by foreign donors. This aspect has been the source of anxiety among many like us.
  4. 4. Regional NGOs (specifically in Bangladesh, where I live) do not seem to be quite professional organizations. Frankly, they are amateur and provincial. Although there are many problems in regional NGOs, I focus on eight issues. Eight Problems that Regional NGOs Face 1. Lack of Long-Term Strategic Planning. ... 2. Poor Cooperation with Mass Media. ... 3. Lack of Commitment. ... 4. Lack of Feedback and Social Support Suppresses Enthusiasm. ... 5.Unwillingness to Cooperate with Each Other. ... 6. Politization of NGOs. ... 7. Lack of Professional Experience of Working in a Particular Area. ... 8. Fear of Grants and International Cooperation
  5. 5. Nowadays Non-Governmental Organizations or NGOs have become an extensively discussed theme in the third world countries as well vastly in social business world. Bangladesh is no exception. The NGOs have appeared as the savior of countless number of people without food, cloth, education and basic health facilities. Bangladesh is one of the top thirteen underprivileged countries. With the record of being the most densely populated country on earth and feeble manpower competency, Bangladesh is facing massive challenge to meet up the demand of her ever- increasing population. Hence NGOs in Bangladesh can continue playing the role of catalyst in the attainment of sustainable economic growth and development provided, an endurable, warm and dependable relationship is there between the Government and NGOs where both are working for the benefit of the people with numerable activities. Their main tasks are to organize these people, create awareness in them and make them development oriented. These organizations are working based on the assessed need and demand of the grass root level farmers and women. By involving the beneficiaries directly, they are working within the context of overall national planning for development.
  6. 6. NGO Futures convene leaders virtually and in-person to learn and collaborate together—increasing overall organizational adaptability and creating a safe space for dialogue on transformational change. NGO Futures also catalyzes scaling of innovation and best practices through leading work with partners. In a time of both challenge and opportunity, NGO Futures creates a pathway forward for civil society organizations.
  7. 7. The following recommendations would improve the existing legal status of NGOs in Bangladesh, by reducing bureaucracy, removing legal contradictions and making NGOs more accountable. State Rules, Acts and Ordinances should be replaced or modified to reflect the current critical atmosphere.[15] The state should remove all administrative and procedural bottlenecks created through promulgation of various Ordinances and streamline the existing working procedures, enabling NGOs to complete all formalities within the shortest time possible. The state should evaluate the strength and weakness of current measures for regulating NGOs and ensure promulgation of flexible and effective rules and regulations. 1. Improving NGO Efficiency 2. Improving the Law 3. Holding NGOs Accountable
  8. 8. In Bangladesh, NGOs play a pivotal and pragmatic role when the state does not reach the poor and meet their needs. Despite their numbers, NGOs have brought little change in levels of poverty. Even the largest NGOs in Bangladesh when taken together cover only a fraction of the population- perhaps only 10-20 percent of landless households (Hasherm, 1995). This highlights the NGO need for reaching more poor and provision of services given the limitations of the state and the laws. So, alleviation of poverty of the masses should be at the top of the agenda of the NGOs, state and donors in Bangladesh. However, the NGOs’ umbrella body (which is required to elect its executive committee) is not broad-based. Elections to the executive committee are often not properly held and its membership is often confined to friends and relatives. This surely frustrates the potential of NGOs as democratic voluntary organisations. Nevertheless, NGOs cannot function in isolation from the mainstream of political, economic and social life in this Country. They must conform to certain standards, adhere to state regulations and have their work coordinated at the state level. NGOs can only complement the state’s activity. Under the current system, the state cannot ask NGOs to become more transparent and accountable or to cooperate more with the state due to donor pressure. The state is very weak in Bangladesh (Wood, 1997). Instead, the state creates undue hindrances which only increase transaction costs of NGOs without encouraging or forcing the NGOs to respond more to the needs of the poor. But still NGOs need to be transparent to their clients, donors and the state both functionally and financially if they really want to represent the interests of the poor or at least provide services to them. Note: 1 US$ was @5 6 Taka in April 2001

Notes de l'éditeur

  • Welcome + Title Name + Group Name
  • Overview of the Industry
  • Current situation of the industry
  • Problem of the industry
  • Benefits of the industry for Bangladesh
  • Future of the Industry in Bangladesh
  • Recommendation how to improve the current industry
  • conclusion
  • Thank you

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