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SIGFOX Makers Tour - Barcelona

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SIGFOX Makers Tour - Barcelona

  1. 1. #7 Barcelona — 26.11.2015
  2. 2. Program • Slides • Demo(s) • Workshop • Fun
  3. 3. Us Nicolas Lesconnec Developer & Maker Evangelist Anthony Charbonnier Startup Relations Manager Jon Regueiro Support Engineer
  4. 4. ABOUT SIGFOX
  5. 5. About SIGFOX • SIGFOX has invented a radiocommunication protocol • SIGFOX is operating a global network • SIGFOX does not sell hardware components • SIGFOX does not build connected solutions
  6. 6. New possibilities • Direct Internet connection. • No battery drain. Years of autonomy. • Detect. Send. Receive. • No configuration
  7. 7. In a nutshell • Power on • Send a message • It’s picked up by n of our base stations • Instantly forwarded to your own server • That’s it
  8. 8. Complexity • AT$SF=0123456789 • No pairing or configuration of any kind • HTTP request to your server
  9. 9. Proof
  10. 10. Why SIGFOX • Hub-based technologies are not compatible with independent devices • Need for a protocol designed for the IoT, and not one tweaked to address it.
  11. 11. Core concepts • Energy efficiency • Very Long Range • Out of the box connectivity • Outdoor + Indoor • Two-way communication • Low bandwidth, small messages • Ultra Narrow Band
  12. 12. Energy efficiency • Tx : ~25/30 mA for a few seconds • 99.x% of the time, device is silent • Idle consumption is key • Idle : a few µA
  13. 13. Very Long Range • Countryside : Tens of kms • Cities : A few kms • Direct line of sight : wow !
  14. 14. Out of the box • Network is serving the devices, not the other way round • Device simply sends a frame, message is detected by n base stations • Message is validated / deduplicated by our backend
  15. 15. Outdoor + indoor • 868MHz has good propagation properties • Radio waves are not magic • Consider ~20dB of attenuation indoor, and ~30dB for light underground or tricky buildings
  16. 16. Two-way communication • Send updates to your device(s) • Default behaviour: wake up, send, back to sleep • No passive Rx mode • Device can receive a message upon request • Every communication is instigated by the device
  17. 17. Low bandwidth • 100 bits / s • 12 bytes per message
  18. 18. 12 bytes !? • Yes. Seriously. 12 bytes. • This is the available payload. • You can put a lot of info in 96 bits • 2^96 is a 30ish-digit number. • 8 billions of billions of billions of possible values
  19. 19. Payload examples • Full GPS Coordinates : 6 bytes • Temperature : 2 bytes • State reporting : 1 byte • Hearbeat, update request : 0 byte
  20. 20. How frequently ? • 140 times a day
  21. 21. 140 times / day • Not a technology limit • Compliant with the European regulation: 1% duty cycle
  22. 22. Money • Most pricey subscription: €14/year • A couple of devices, 140 messages/day • The higher volume, the lower the price • The lower number of messages, the lower the price • Down to €1/year for large volumes & a couple of messages/day • Startup plan : €8/year, as if already 30k devices.
  23. 23. Security
  24. 24. Security • Each device is identified by a unique ID on the network • Each message is signed • Servers managed by ourselves, in 2 french datacenters. • Security is never finished, permanent effort.
  25. 25. Signature • Each message is accompanied by an hashed signature, made from : • the device id • the device PK (unknown to the user) • the payload • internal increment
  26. 26. Signature • Replayed messages • Altered messages • Spoofed messages
  27. 27. Encryption • By default, the payload is not encrypted • Encryption cost a lot of energy • No « one size fits all » solution. • Up to you to use the encryption most suited to your case
  28. 28. Radio properties • Great resistance to interferors • Very difficult to jam • Interception is hard • UNB • Unpredictable frequency
  29. 29. Radio properties
  30. 30. Ultra Narrow Band
  31. 31. Ultra Narrow Band • The SIGFOX protocol relies on the Ultra Narrow Band technology • A message : ~100Hz wide • Each base station watch a 200KHz part of the spectrum • Hard part: detect message without knowledge of the precise frequency or schedule
  32. 32. Ultra Narrow Band • Why Ultra Narrow Band ? • Easy analogy : cars vs motorbikes
  33. 33. Quiet Base station
  34. 34. Undesired signals
  35. 35. Message received
  36. 36. Frequency used • SIGFOX uses unlicensed sub-GHz bands : • 868MHz in Europe • 902MHz in the US
  37. 37. Unlicensed != unregulated • SIGFOX complies with both ETSI (Europe) & FCC (US) regulations • ETSI : 1% duty cycle • FCC : duration of emission
  38. 38. Coverage
  39. 39. Global network • Roaming is included in the basic subscription • Your device can switch from one country to another without additional charges.
  40. 40. Current - Nationwide • France • Netherlands • Spain • UK
  41. 41. Current - cities • Bogota • Dublin • Milan • Munich • Santiago • San Francisco • …
  42. 42. Rollout in progress • Belgium • Denmark • Italy • Luxembourg • Portugal • USA
  43. 43. USA • Currently: San Francisco • Early 2016 : 10 majors cities, including Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles • And we’re just starting :)
  44. 44. Hello World
  45. 45. Hello World • Send a dummy message • Check it on the SIGFOX website • Forward it through the callback mechanism • Store message in a database • Display list of recorded events
  46. 46. Use cases
  47. 47. IoT != Connected gadgets Sexy Stuff BORING BUT USEFUL IOT
  48. 48. Good use cases • Not that talkative devices : small messages every now and then • Independent devices
  49. 49. Metering & utilities
  50. 50. Smart City
  51. 51. • Track the location of any good or equipment • Post theft devices Logistics
  52. 52. Ifttt-like • Press the button, send an empty frame & trigger any pre determined action • « Mom I’m home ! » • « Get me a taxi» • Replay last order, ~Amazon Dash
  53. 53. « Silver economy » • Health monitoring, fall alerts, .. • Without the locked-in effect of gateway-based solutions • Track the community-payed services effectiveness • Did the carer really come every day for 2 hours ?
  54. 54. • Know when some equipment is about to fail • Schedule maintenance works efficiently Predictive maintenance
  55. 55. Agriculture • Monitor environment values all over an exploitation : light, soil moisture, .. • Animal health & location tracking
  56. 56. DIY Projects • Connected wine cellar. Because french. • Connected cat food dispenser. Because cats. • Kitchen garden: temperature, moisture, … • GPS Tracking of anything
  57. 57. You ? • You can build a PoC very quickly • Lot of funny stuff to make • And lot of $$$ to make too ;) • KISS, dumb device means: • Cheap • Less prone to failure
  58. 58. Hardware
  59. 59. Hardware SIGFOX • SIGFOX is not a hardware vendor • Many established partners offer SIGFOX-ready chips: Atmel, TI, Silicon Labs, Axsem, Atim, … • Most Sub-GHz radio transceivers are compatible, it’s just about a software upgrade.
  60. 60. Prototyping • Arduino : Snootlab, SmartEverything • Raspberry Pi : Yadom • Can be bought one unit a time • Get started within minutes • Not for industrial use
  61. 61. Modules • Easy to work with : AT commands • Price range from ~10 to 20€ • Evaluation boards available from manufacturers : Adeunis, Telecom Design, Telit, ..
  62. 62. SoC, transceivers • Texas Instruments, Atmel, SiLabs, Axsem, .. • Cheap, a few $ • More complex to work with if not familiar • Certification needed if you don’t stick to the provided ref design.
  63. 63. Antenna • Critical when doing radio • 868MHz -> best case is 17cm (lambda/2) • Helicoidal, patch, … antennas possible.
  64. 64. Cloud
  65. 65. Get your data • Part of the standard service. • 3 ways • View - website • Pull - HTTP API • Push - HTTP Callback
  66. 66. Common use case : push callbacks • Get notified each time of your devices send a message • Can trigger whatever you want : alarm, notification, data processing, … • Example here: http://github.com/nicolsc/sigfox- callback-demo
  67. 67. Set up a callback
  68. 68. Downlink • Message sent to a device can be • Automatic with a pre configuration • Sent from your own server
  69. 69. Downlink auto • Simply set what message you want to send back • Hardcoded • Time, Station ID, .. for sync purposes
  70. 70. Downlink callback • Same mechanism than the uplink callback • Set up an URL • An when called, send your 8-byte frame within the response body
  71. 71. Real demo
  72. 72. Connected RFID reader • Standard 125KHz RFID reader & tags • Once a tag is detected, send its ID through SIGFOX • Update a live dashboard • Do something else :)
  73. 73. Resources • https://github.com/ameltech/ • + Checkout http://github.com/nicolsc for some demos & sample codes
  74. 74. First steps with the SmartEverything
  75. 75. Register • http://backend.sigfox.com/activate • Click SmartEverything • Enter the device id of your board + the provided PAC number • Check http://192.168.5.38:1234/ • Operator : select SIGFOX_Spain • Enter your personal info
  76. 76. Getting started • Plug the SmartEverything board using a micro USB cable • Plug the antenna ;) • Check that it’s recognised by your computer • $ ls /dev/tty.* • Windows • Launch Powershell • > [System.IO.Ports.SerialPort]::getportnames()
  77. 77. Arduino setup • Install the Arduino Zero core • Tools > Boards > Board Manager • Install the ASME core • Tools > Boards > Manager (Again !), filter on type=Partner • Choose the SmartEverything Board Type • Tools > Boards • Install the libs associated to each sensor (... and to the SIGFOX module) • Sketch > Include Library > Manage Libraries ; Filter on Type=Partner ; install each library
  78. 78. 1st Arduino Sketch • Open the Arduino IDE • Select Board Type > Smart Everything Fox (USB) • Select the correct port • File > Examples > SmartEverything > VL6180X > AmbientLight • Upload • The blue LED on the board should blink
  79. 79. Hello World • File > Examples > SmartEverything > Sigfox > DataModeEU • Upload
  80. 80. Check message • http://backend.sigfox.com • Navigate to the « device » menu • Click on the device ID • « Devices messages »
  81. 81. Set up a callback
  82. 82. Callbacks menu • On your device page, go to Info & click on the device type • On the device type page, you have a Callbacks menu • Then, click New on the top right corner
  83. 83. Callback Setup • You can choose to receive an email, or redirect each message to a URL of your choice • You can set the headers (content-type, ..), and body format of the HTTP request
  84. 84. Downlink
  85. 85. How does it work ? • The Module send the frame, then sleep for 20s • Then it enters Rx mode • Waits 20s for a response • Quits Rx mode & goes to deep sleep
  86. 86. Request a downlink • Use the AT$SF command, with an additional parameters • AT$SF = [hex byte]*, 2, 1
  87. 87. Set up the downlink
  88. 88. Handle the response • When entering Rx mode, the module will display • +RX BEGIN • Received frame will be displayed as • +RX=[hex byte] [hex byte]… • When leaving Rx mode, it will display • +RX END
  89. 89. Handle the response • Detect an input line starting with +RX= & parse it as a series of hex bytes • If no downlink message has been sent, you’ll have no +RX= line, just the BEGIN & END flags
  90. 90. Sample input/output AT$SF=55 50 4c 49 4e 4b, 2, 1 OK +RX BEGIN +RX=44 4f 57 4e 4c 49 4e 4b +RX END
  91. 91. Contribute
  92. 92. Share • Please share what you’ll make with SIGFOX • Hackster.io, instructables, github … your move. • Q&A • http://sigfox.cloud.answerhub.com/ • Keep in touch : • nicolas.lesconnec@sigfox.com • twitter: @nlesconnec

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