Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.
Presentation of key 
findings of CIFOR 
case book on REDD+ 
subnational initiatives 
William D. Sunderlin 
CIFOR Official ...
Background 
 CIFOR’s Global Comparative Study 
on REDD+ 
 Module 2 on subnational initiatives 
 Aim: Know what works an...
Location of subnational initiatives included in the CIFOR GCS study. 
PERU BRAZIL 
12 
TANZANIA 
CAMEROON 
INDONESIA 
VIET...
Characterization of sample 
• Typically cover 650 to 6,500 km2 
• 17 tropical wet and 6 dry climate zone 
• 13 private non...
Information in case 
chapters 
 Basic facts: where, who, why, 
when 
 Strategy of the proponent 
including interventions...
CIFOR scientist Amy Duchelle and consultant Kaline Rossi visit an açai nursery in Acre, Brazil. 
(Kate Evans/CIFOR) 
Finan...
Tenure 
 Tenure in initiatives must be clarified to: 
• Identify right holder & responsibility bearer 
• Shield participa...
Men and women in a study village remove the thorny outer layer of rattan vines as part ofrattan processing. They are craft...
MRV  MRV capabilities highly 
uneven across countries, 
initiatives, and emissions 
sources 
 Slow progress on 
monitori...
Safeguards 
 Smallholders at the sites largely dependent on agriculture 
 About 40% of households have cleared forest in...
Main insights 
• Prospects of significant funding encouraged proponents to pilot 
many different versions and visions of R...
We thank our donors!
www.cifor.org/redd-case-book
Related publications 
Cromberg, Marina, Amy E. Duchelle, and Isa de Oliveira Rocha. 2014. Local 
participation in REDD+: L...
Related publications 
Resosudarmo, Ida Aju Pradnja, Stibniati S. Atmadja, Andini Desita Ekaputri, Dian Y. 
Intarini, Yayan...
REDD+ subnational initiatives: Key findings of CIFOR case book
Prochain SlideShare
Chargement dans…5
×

REDD+ subnational initiatives: Key findings of CIFOR case book

1 680 vues

Publié le

This presentation was given by William D. Sunderlin at "REDD+ Emerging? What we can learn from subnational initiatives", a CIFOR Official Side Event at COP 20 in Lima, Peru on Friday, 5 December.

Publié dans : Environnement
  • Soyez le premier à commenter

REDD+ subnational initiatives: Key findings of CIFOR case book

  1. 1. Presentation of key findings of CIFOR case book on REDD+ subnational initiatives William D. Sunderlin CIFOR Official Side Event: “REDD+ emerging?: What we can learn from subnational initiatives” Friday December 5, 2014 COP 20, Lima, Peru
  2. 2. Background  CIFOR’s Global Comparative Study on REDD+  Module 2 on subnational initiatives  Aim: Know what works and does not in setting up REDD+ initiatives  Criteria: effectiveness, efficiency, equity, wellbeing, rights, biodiversity (3E+)  Surveys of households, villages, women, proponents, other stakeholders  Remote sensing Brazil nut concession trail, Carmen Rosa, Peru. (Valerie Garrish/CIFOR)
  3. 3. Location of subnational initiatives included in the CIFOR GCS study. PERU BRAZIL 12 TANZANIA CAMEROON INDONESIA VIETNAM 3 7 8 6 4 2 1 5 9 10 11 16 13 14 15 22 19 20 18 17 23 21 BRAZIL 1. Acre 2. Bolsa Floresta 3. Cotriguaç u 4. Jari/Amapá 5. SFX 6. Transamazon PERU 7. Madre de Dios 8. Ucayali CAMEROON 9. Mt. Cameroon 10. SE Cameroon Legend REDD+ initiatives TANZANIA 11. Kigoma 12. Zanzibar 13. Kilosa 14. Lindi 15. Mpingo 16. Shinyanga INDONESIA 17. KFCP 18. Katingan 19. KCCP 20. Rimba Raya 21. TNC within BFCP 22. Ulu Masen VIETNAM 23. Cat Tien
  4. 4. Characterization of sample • Typically cover 650 to 6,500 km2 • 17 tropical wet and 6 dry climate zone • 13 private nonprofit, 4 private for-profit, 4 public sector, 2 mixed private-public • To date mostly rely on public sector funding • 17 operate at project scale and 6 jurisdictional • Many engaged in conservation at site prior to REDD+ • 18 continuing of which 15 as REDD+ • 5 have ceased to operate
  5. 5. Information in case chapters  Basic facts: where, who, why, when  Strategy of the proponent including interventions  Smallholders and villages, including information on livelihoods, forest dependence and deforestation  Challenges experienced by proponents in meeting goals  Insights or lessons offered by the initiative Small-scale farmers in Mato Grosso being interviewed by the Brazilian news station, Rede Globo, about their agroforestry production. (Icaro Cooke Vieira/CIFOR)
  6. 6. CIFOR scientist Amy Duchelle and consultant Kaline Rossi visit an açai nursery in Acre, Brazil. (Kate Evans/CIFOR) Finances  Original core concept of REDD+: performance-based incentives funded by an international market for carbon offsets  Most planned to sell carbon credits but to date only 4 have  Most funding from bilateral and other public sources  Less than half have made conditional payments  Most emphasize non-conditional livelihood enhancements
  7. 7. Tenure  Tenure in initiatives must be clarified to: • Identify right holder & responsibility bearer • Shield participants against resource rush • Provide incentives for forest conservation • Enable effective rights of exclusion • Avoid conflicting land use at landscape scale  Tenure insecurity is pervasive in tropical forests  Proponents rate tenure as their no. 1 challenge  Proponents are engaged in earnest efforts to lay an appropriate tenure foundation for REDD+ but are encountering grave obstacles and have a long way to go
  8. 8. Men and women in a study village remove the thorny outer layer of rattan vines as part ofrattan processing. They are crafted into baskets, bags and mats, or sold as semi processed rattan. (Nugroho Adi Utomo/CIFOR) Scale • Six jurisdictional initiatives • Jurisdictional approach facilitates work across sectors, but inhibited by interests embedded in public agencies • Necessary to embed climate change mitigation actions in laws, regulations, and institutions of the state to ensure continuity in the face of electoral uncertainty
  9. 9. MRV  MRV capabilities highly uneven across countries, initiatives, and emissions sources  Slow progress on monitoring small-scale mosaic deforestation and degradation that are ubiquitous throughout tropical forests  Diversity of emission sources across the 23 sites clearly points to the importance of locally tailored MRV systems Coffee production at Boa Frente
  10. 10. Safeguards  Smallholders at the sites largely dependent on agriculture  About 40% of households have cleared forest in prior 2 years  Livelihoods potentially at risk from REDD+ interventions  Results show local stakeholders clearly concerned about this  Many proponents offering sustainable agriculture as alternative but this is difficult to do efficiently and equitably
  11. 11. Main insights • Prospects of significant funding encouraged proponents to pilot many different versions and visions of REDD+ • But core concept of performance-based incentives proved difficult to implement without secure long-term funding • Once the enabling conditions are right, REDD+ as originally conceived could emerge. Among the enabling conditions are: • International climate agreement • Funding for carbon and complementary benefits • Tenure foundation that motivates conservation and protects against threats • Embed REDD+ in state institutions and shelter from electoral politics without entangling in inter-sectoral politics • Design social safeguards based on detailed understanding of heterogeneity of local livelihoods
  12. 12. We thank our donors!
  13. 13. www.cifor.org/redd-case-book
  14. 14. Related publications Cromberg, Marina, Amy E. Duchelle, and Isa de Oliveira Rocha. 2014. Local participation in REDD+: Lessons from the eastern Brazilian Amazon. Forests 5:579-598. Dokken, Therese, Susan Caplow, Arild Angelsen, and William D. Sunderlin. 2014. Tenure Issues in REDD+ Pilot Project Sites in Tanzania. Forests 5(2):234-255; doi:10.3390/f5020234 Duchelle, Amy E., Marina Cromberg, Maria Fernanda Gebara, Raissa Guerra, Tadeu Melo, Anne Larson, Peter Cronkleton, Jan Börner, Erin Sills, Sven Wunder, Simone Bauch, Peter May, Galia Selaya, William D. Sunderlin. 2014. Linking Forest Tenure Reform, Environmental Compliance, and Incentives: Lessons from REDD+ Initiatives in the Brazilian Amazon. World Development 55, 53- 67; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.01.014 Jagger, Pamela, Maria Brockhaus, Amy E. Duchelle, Maria Fernanda Gebara, Kathleen Lawlor, Ida Aju Pradnja Resosudarmo and William D. Sunderlin. 2014. Multi-Level Policy Dialogues, Processes, and Actions: Challenges and Opportunities for National REDD+ Safeguards Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV). Forests 5(9), 2136-2162; doi:10.3390/f5092136
  15. 15. Related publications Resosudarmo, Ida Aju Pradnja, Stibniati S. Atmadja, Andini Desita Ekaputri, Dian Y. Intarini, Yayan Indriatmoko, and Pangestuti Astri. 2014. Does Tenure Security Lead to REDD+ Project Effectiveness? Reflections from Five Emerging Sites in Indonesia. World Development 55, 68-83; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.01.015 Sunderlin, William D. 2014. Why Tenure is Key to Fulfilling Climate and Ethical Goals in REDD+. REDD+ Safeguard Brief 3. Bogor, Indonesia: Center for International Forestry Research. Sunderlin, William D., Anne Larson, Amy E. Duchelle, Ida Aju Pradnja Resosudarmo, Thu Ba Huynh, Abdon Awono, and Therese Dokken. 2014. How are REDD+ proponents addressing tenure problems? Evidence from Brazil, Cameroon, Tanzania, Indonesia, and Vietnam. World Development 55, 37-52, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.01.013 Sunderlin, William D., Andini Desita Ekaputri, Erin O. Sills, Amy E. Duchelle, Demetrius L. Kweka , Rachael Diprose, Nike Doggart, Steve Ball, Rebeca Lima, Adrian Enright, JorgeTorres, Herlina Hartanto, and Angélica Toniolo. 2014. The challenge of establishing REDD+ on the ground: Insights from 23 subnational initiatives in six countries. Occasional Paper 104. Bogor, Indonesia: Center for International Forestry Research.

×