Ce diaporama a bien été signalé.
Nous utilisons votre profil LinkedIn et vos données d’activité pour vous proposer des publicités personnalisées et pertinentes. Vous pouvez changer vos préférences de publicités à tout moment.

Praying Mantis

7 015 vues

Publié le

Publié dans : Art & Photos
  • Curiosas criaturas y a la vez fascinantes. Otro gran trabajo por tu parte, como ya es habitual en ti. Muchas gracias, querida Olga. Un fuerte abrazo.
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici
  • Very interesting and fascinating. I didn't know about this insects. Thank you Olga.
    Have a nice weekend!
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici
  • Su ritual es muy llamativo, parecen una pareja de baile en perfecta armonía! Muchas gracias Olga.Un abrazo grande y buen finde!!
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici
  • Pues no sé..., a mi estos insectos siempre me han parecido sacados de una pesadilla alienígena y como bien dices..., pasar los genes a la próxima generación les parecerá bien a los machos de la especie..., pero en lo que a mi respecta, me parece una aberración..., lo que yo te diga, extraterrestes al fin y al cabo, jajaja.

    Gracias querida, un beso
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici
  • Muchas gracias, sardanas. Sí, eso... bichos simpáticos ...ji, ji..para nosotros los humanos, aunque me imagino que no tanto para los machos de la misma especie, ya que con frecuencia durante la copulación estos pierden la cabeza por la 'mujer fatal'. Muertos caen pero contentos ante la ocasión de haber pasado sus genes a su próxima generación; de hecho hay que admirar la Naturaleza y su imaginación.
       Répondre 
    Voulez-vous vraiment ?  Oui  Non
    Votre message apparaîtra ici

Praying Mantis

  1. 1. Praying Mantis
  2. 2. The praying mantis is named for its prominent front legs, which are bent and held together at an angle that suggests the position of prayer. The larger group of these insects is more properly called the praying mantids. Mantis refers to the genus mantis, to which only some praying mantids belong. By any name, these fascinating insects are formidable predators. They have triangular heads poised on a long "neck," or elongated thorax. Mantids can turn their heads 180 degrees to scan their surroundings with two large compound eyes and three other simple eyes located between them. Typically green or brown and well camouflaged on the plants among which they live, mantis lie in ambush or patiently stalk their quarry. They use their front legs to snare their prey with reflexes so quick that they are difficult to see with the naked eye. Their legs are further equipped with spikes for snaring prey and pinning it in place. Moths, crickets, grasshoppers, flies, and other insects are usually the unfortunate recipients of unwanted mantid attention. However, the insects will also eat others of their own kind. The most famous example of this is the notorious mating behavior of the adult female, who sometimes eats her mate just after—or even during—mating. Yet this behavior seems not to deter males from reproduction. Females regularly lay hundreds of eggs in a small case, and nymphs hatch looking much like tiny versions of their parents.
  3. 3. end
  4. 4. cast Praying Mantis images and text credit www. www.dailymail.co.uk www.nationalgeographic.com 35photo.ru www.telegraph.co.uk www.handleynation.com flickrhivemind.net Music Louis Armstrong - Tango created o.e. thanks for watching

×