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TITIAN. “Poesie” for Philip II.

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Titian, painter of poetry
... a series of mythological paintings commissioned by Philip II of Spain, king as devout as he is fond of erotica

Publié dans : Art & Photos
  • @Toker Bella , gràcies, Bella ... bolshoe spasibo.
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  • @johndemi , thank you, dear John. A big hug.
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  • Wonderful! Thank you very much, Olga!
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  • Superb presentation,bravo Olga,un abrazo muy grande.
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  • Superb presentation,bravo Olga,un abrazo muy grande.
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TITIAN. “Poesie” for Philip II.

  1. 1. Titian, painter of poetry ... a series of mythological paintings commissioned by Philip II of Spain, king as devout as he is fond of erotica
  2. 2. TITIAN “Poesie” for Philip II
  3. 3. a scene of rape (abduction) … Europa, Phoenician princess: ... I’m sprawled helplessly on the a bull's back, my clothes are in disarray. Zeus: ... that was such a fun day. The water was really warm. (by the way, i'm the bull)
  4. 4. TIZIANO Vecellio Rape of Europa 1559-1562 Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston
  5. 5. Danae totally fulfills all the requirements for the position of damsel in distress … her dad, King Acrisius, locks her in a bronze chamber (the Oracle of Delphi told him that she'd give birth to a son who would kill him) later, when Zeus impregnates her with Perseus as a shower of gold, Acrisius locks her in a chest and throws her in the sea
  6. 6. TIZIANO Vecellio Danae receiving the Golden Rain 1553-1554 Museo del Prado, Madrid
  7. 7. Surprise, surprise: Zeus gets all hot and bothered about the beautiful nymph, Callisto. The trouble is that Callisto, follower of Artemis, has sworn to stay a virgin all her life. Zeus, in his plan of seduction, disguises himself in the form of Artemis and seduces Callisto. ... Callisto is pregnant. Artemis finds out and transforms her loyal follower into a bear. But, king of the gods does something nice: places both mother and son in the sky, where they shine to this day as Ursa Major and Ursa Minor. … tragedy or happy ending?
  8. 8. TIZIANO Vecellio Diana and Callisto 1556-1559 National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh
  9. 9. With Medusa's head and his winged sandals Perseus soars above Ethiopia. When he gets to the ocean sees a girl chained toa big rock and instantly falls in love with the beautiful maiden. Is Andromeda, the daughter of Cepheus, king of Ethiopia, chained to feed Cetus a giant, maiden-eating sea monster. Perseus says he'll slay the monster in return for Andromeda's hand in marriage. An epic battle ensues, and kills the monster.
  10. 10. TIZIANO Vecellio Perseus and Andromeda 1554-1556 Wallace Collection, London
  11. 11. Artemis was the original awesome lady with a bow, arrow and a fierce posse of nymphs ... and with a temper which occasionally leads her to some misunderstandings ... and here's the moment when the young hunter bursts in where the goddess and her nymphs are bathing (Artemis furious, will turn Actaeon into a stag ... haven't you ever been in the wrong place at the wrong time?)
  12. 12. TIZIANO Vecellio Diana and Actaeon 1556-1559 National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh
  13. 13. ... a goddess outraged to appear naked in front of a mortal Actaeon wanders deep into the woods and he sees Artemis, naked as a baby mole rat. Shocked and embarrassed, the goddess reaches for her trusty bow. But then she gets a better idea: she transforms him into a deer. As he runs away, Actaeon encounters his hunting dogs, who tear their former master apart with their vicious fangs. Not a happy ending.
  14. 14. TIZIANO Vecellio Death of Actaeon 1562 National Gallery, London
  15. 15. ... the young Adonis pulling himself away from Venus, his lover. Under the trees behind them at left Cupid lies asleep, with his bow and quiver of arrows hanging from a tree … this is not a time for love … one day Adonis is gored by a wounded wild boar. Venus, in the sky in her chariot, hears his cries but cannot save him.
  16. 16. TIZIANO Vecellio Venus and Adonis 1554 Museo del Prado, Madrid
  17. 17. olga_oes TITIAN. “Poesie” for Philip II TITIAN. “Poésie” pour Philippe II images and text credit www. Music Simply Three - Rain created olga.e. thanks for watching
  18. 18. Titian's connection with Philip II continued right up to the painter's final days. Amongst the last pictures sent to Spain was the Tarquin and Lucretia, now in Cambridge.
  19. 19. TIZIANO Vecellio Tarquin and Lucretia 1568-1571 Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge
  20. 20. ... seduced by her beauty and her exemplary virtue Sextus Tarquinius raped Lucretia after threatening to kill her if she rejected his advances the next day she exposed him and committed suicide ...
  21. 21. Mythological paintings (poesie) for Philip II (1553-1562) by Titian Titian painted for Philip II several mythological scenes and allegories with strong erotic elements. In his letters to Philip, Titian described these works as 'poesie' and 'favole', vague terms that can be roughly translated as 'poetic inventions' and 'fables', respectively. The terms have several implications: that the pictures had a literary source, that painting and poetry made the same creative demands, and that the artist - like the poet - was entitled to a certain license in the interpretation of his sources. The subjects of these pantheistic works are drawn chiefly from Ovid's Metamorphoses. The first of the poesie sent to Philip in 1554, Danaë with a Nurse, a more explicitly sensual version. Two of Titian's best-loved poesie are Diana and Acteon, and Diana and Callisto, sent to Spain late in 1559 and today in Edinburgh. In their variety of pose, iridescent sensuality and rich colorism on a limited palette, they set an example to generations of artists from Rubens and Velázquez to Watteau and Delacroix.

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