SlideShare une entreprise Scribd logo
EMPATHETICALLY PATHETIC VIVALDI
This opera, L’Olimpiade by Vivaldi, is on a libretto by Pietro Metastasio written in 1733 for Antonio
Caldara. But then dozens of other composers used the plot and the libretto in many different ways but
always with an operatic dimension. Vivaldi was only one of them, and it was used all over Europe, not only in
Italy. It is a melodrama from beginning to end using all sorts of plot elements that create the most
melodramatic situations in the classic ancient Greek theater.
First of all, but revealed only in the last scene, a father and king decides to expose his son to the sea
because he does not want a son, or this son. The man entrusted with this mission to throw the baby into the
sea does not expose the boy but gives him to the first person he meets on the beach who accepts to take
the boy under his custody. The boy is entrusted to that man with only one distinctive element: a necklace
that will reveal his real identity at the end of the opera just before having his head cut off. This is the pattern
of Oedipus, but in this case, the son does not kill his father nor marry his mother and have children from her,
children who are the son and daughter of their own half-brother since they all have the same mother.
Second, this boy now a young man is Licida. The man who accepted him is a king on the island of
Crete. Licida has a female partner, though not married, in Crete and he abandons her to come to his
birthplace, though he does not know it is because he is suddenly attracted by the daughter Aristea of the
local King. This father reveals at the very beginning of the opera that he is a monstrous father for the second
time in his life though it is long before we learn about his exposing the baby or child Licida, hence for the first
time in the opera. He promises to give his daughter in marriage to the man who will win a particular fight in
the Olympic Games happening in the same period. But Licida is not a great fighter, he has little chance to
win, especially since a champion is entering the fight.
Third, Licida is a cheater, born as such and unforgivable and unimprovable. So, since the champion,
Megacle, is his friend, he asks him to enter the fight under his name, so that he will be sure to win Aristea.
But Aristea is in love with Megacle and Megacle is in love with Aristea. Licida has no chance whatsoever to
win Aristea’s heart and his cheating in this Olympic Game is absolutely unacceptable in the context. He is
bound to be found out and to be exposed, this time without failing, to the disapproval of the audience and
first of all of the local king, the father of Aristea. Sure enough, when it is discovered or revealed the King
banishes Licida who gets angry and even plans the death of the local King, Clistene by the way.
During that time, Megacle tries to kill himself when he realizes, a little bit too late, that he had been
cheating, which is quite obvious, and he should have known that from the very start. He is saved at the last
minute or so. Aristea, on her side, tries to do the same thing and is also saved at the last minute. Discovering
Licida’s plan to kill him, and confronted with the dramatic suicide attempts, the king decides to have Licida
sacrificed on the altar of the main temple, now he is exposed as a cheater and a plotter. The king grants him
his last wish when he is ready to be executed in the temple: Licida wants to say farewell to Megacle and
explain to him how sorry he is. It is at this moment the happy ending takes place.
The king recognizes the pendant Licida is wearing and a quick deus ex machina brings the man who
was supposed to expose Licida to the sea. It is revealed that Licida had been saved and raised by the King
of Crete. The local king, despite his antecedents finally becomes one iota more humane. He changes his
mind, forgives his now son Licida, gives Aristea in marriage to Megacle, and imposes onto Licida to marry
the woman he had abandoned in Crete, Argene.
The extreme popularity of this twisted and in many ways perverse story on the Italian and European
opera stages in the 18th century, before the French Revolution, reveals how explosive the situation must
have been in Europe then. Even Mozart fell into this popular trap though he went at least one hundred miles
farther with his Marriage of Figaro, essentially because he used Beaumarchais’s play situated in the modern
French society of the time, thus exposing and denouncing the privileges of the nobles and their utmost lack
of humanity to get their own pleasure from people who did not consent at all.
But here we are, and Antonio Vivaldi made this story an opera that is not the only one, maybe not the
best one, but certainly one of the dozens of operas based on this libretto that is worth saving, savoring, and
enjoying. The original opera can reach three hours and a half in Baldassare Galuppi’s version, and this
recording is only two hours and twelve minutes. The libretto was known at the time to be extremely long due
to the verbose recitatives. The librettist had a break in his career, before and after the death of one of his
patrons. The next generation patron decided to order only shorter pieces from him and no longer his
enormous operas. This recording of Vivaldi’s adaptation does not contain all the recitatives and concentrates
on the arias, duets, and other fully operatic parts, and cuts short the longer purely narrative sections.
Now we can listen to the music and only consider it.
The music is light, very light indeed, maybe too light. The actors are discussing questions that mean life
or death for them, just as if it were a casual game of poker.
The choice of the various voices is not the best. Aristea would have been better as a soprano. I find her
mezzo-soprano texture slightly too somber, maybe justified due to the father she has, but she is speaking of
love as if she were burying the loving grandmother of her family. Argene, the first woman Licida had courted,
is also a mezzo-soprano, a voice dictated by the connection to Licida, and the fact she is disguised as a
man. But that reduces the two women to a second-rank, somber tone as if to be loved, desired by, or to
desire Licida was a curse. It probably is but the choice is not the best because the two women do not come
out dominant and fiery like any female lover should be, and here they come out, both of them, as motherly, in
many ways frustrating, reprimanding and chastising counterparts. What is attractive in them at all?
Licida is another story. He is a countertenor and was originally a contralto travesti woman in Vivaldi’s
time, which sounds strange for this character who is a phallocrat. But Gerard Lesne is a beautiful voice even
if slightly too low to be a real castrato, or close to it. Was the score composed for this rendering? How can
we know since he is very mysterious, even sort of plotting in the wings of the stage, which he is actually
doing, but a more conquering voice would have been good.
But the choice of a soprano for Megacle is for me a full mistake. He is the champion, the hero. He has
to be the High-pitched Countertenor who can create awe and draw blood just with one sharp note, and this is
not the case because the harmonics are not male harmonics. Vivaldi did not compose the score like that. He
had a castrato, the voice of heroes in the 18th century. So, a female soprano is not the best choice. The
audience should feel awed and elated by every move of Megacle on the stage. He is the champion, the hero,
the man everyone must admire, and that man has to be a man, not a female soprano, hence a castrato in
Vivaldi’s time and a countertenor in modern times.
The recording was done in 1990, before Philippe Jaroussky, but there were other countertenors in
Europe at the time. True enough not many, but James Bowman was quite available. Clistene is perfectly
chosen with his bass voice. He is the dictator we expect, and he does not disappoint us: inhumane,
tyrannical, openly capricious, whimsical, and stubborn and we can wonder in what dimension he is in any
way attractive, gentle, appealing. He sings as if with a sledgehammer between his teeth ready to smash and
mash the skull of anyone who would stand in his path.
I must admit the second bass is the other man connected to Clistene. Licida is taken between two
basses that are sledgehammering him into pulp and on the other hand he is caught between two mezzo-
sopranos that cannot compete with the sledge-hammering basses. That leaves Licida the master of his
cheating egocentric and selfish circle. Some could tell me that is perfectly calculated. And I would agree. But
it can be seen as the exposing of such a pitiful situation and a pitiful as much as pitiless king and his
mischievous, odd, and droll son Licida who is from another queer and quaint universe.
I must admit I liked the original distribution better when I consider the vicious core of this fable of
corrupted cheating in the Olympic Games. Licida is a travesti contralto revealing like that his basic nature of
a fake gentleman, a fake fighter, and a fake lover too. And he is surrounded by two real castrati described as
soprani, knowing castrati were heroes, particularly warriors. Megacle is such a hero of the stadium or the
arena of the Olympic Games, and Aminta is Licida’s tutor and as such is another type of hero: the one who is
trying to educate this fake son of a king, which must be a herculean task: remember Licida is the adoptive
son (who does not know it) of the king of Crete, and the real son of Clistene (who does not know it) the king
of Sicyon.
In the end, this mishmash is smoothened down to a very happy solution. Everyone is forgiven or
pardoned, the two younger gentlemen (though one is not really a gentleman) are married to two young ladies
and at least one couple out of two is really in love. The other couple is bound to become divorcing flesh or
meat, probably after some good old Ancient Greek domestic violence. Remember Agamemnon. Remember
the Alamo.
But you will find in this recording that reduced the opera by one-third (by cutting off big sections of
recitatives that included at times some more elaborate arias, duets, or choirs. The recording then contains
essentially arias, and you can concentrate on the beauty of these arias. Vivaldi was a genius for such
compositions, light and yet at times somber, appealing like hell, and at times slightly repetitive. An aria at the
time was generally composed of two equal sections and the singing was repetitive as for the words but with
variations on the music. Vivaldi goes beyond what is generally done. The first part twice, then the second
part, often only once, at times twice, and then back to the first part once or at times twice. Vivaldi composes
arias with three parts, and he dares repeat some of these parts three times. That makes them mesmerizing,
maybe even hypnotizing.
Dr. Jacques COULARDEAU
Cet opéra, L'Olimpiade de Vivaldi, est sur un livret de Pietro Metastasio écrit en 1733 pour Antonio
Caldara. Mais ensuite des dizaines d’autres compositeurs ont utilisé l’intrigue et le livret de différentes
manières, mais toujours avec une dimension lyrique. Vivaldi n’était que l’un d’entre eux, et ce livret fut utilisé
dans toute l’Europe, pas seulement en Italie. Il s'agit d'un mélodrame du début à la fin utilisant toutes sortes
d'éléments d'intrigue qui utilisent les situations les plus mélodramatiques du théâtre grec antique classique.
Tout d'abord, mais révélé seulement dans la dernière scène, un père et roi décide d'exposer son fils à
la mer car il ne veut pas de fils, ou pas de ce fils. L'homme chargé de cette mission de jeter le bébé à la mer,
ne noie pas le garçon mais le confie à la première personne qu'il rencontre sur la plage et qui accepte de
prendre le garçon sous sa garde. Le garçon est confié à cet homme avec un seul élément distinctif : un
collier avec un médaillon qui révélera sa véritable identité à la fin de l'opéra juste avant qu’on ne lui coupe la
tête. C'est une copie conforme d'Œdipe, mais dans ce cas le fils ne tue pas son père ni n'épouse sa mère et
n'a pas des enfants d'elle, des enfants qui sont le fils et la fille de leur propre demi-frère puisqu'ils ont tous la
même mère.
Deuxièmement, ce garçon maintenant jeune homme est Licida. L'homme qui l'a accepté est roi de l'île
de Crète. Licida a une compagne, bien qu’ils ne soient pas mariés, en Crète et il l'abandonne pour venir
dans sa ville natale, sans savoir que c’est sa ville natale, car il est soudainement attiré par la fille Aristée du
roi local, le père de Licida, bien que Licida ne le sache pas, du moins pas plus que le roi local. Ce père
révèle au tout début de l'opéra qu'il est un père monstrueux pour la deuxième fois de sa vie, même s'il faut
attendre longtemps avant d'apprendre qu'il a exposé le bébé ou l'enfant Licida, donc pour la première fois
dans l'opéra. Il promet de donner sa fille en mariage à l'homme qui remportera un combat particulier aux
Jeux Olympiques qui se déroulent dans la même période. Mais Licida n'est pas un grand champion en lutte,
il a peu de chances de gagner, d'autant plus qu'un champion entre dans le combat.
Troisièmement, Licida est un tricheur, comme de naissance, qu’on ne peut ni pardonner ni améliorer.
Ainsi, puisque le champion, Megacle, est son ami, il lui demande d'entrer dans le combat sous son nom, afin
d'être sûr de gagner Ariste. Mais Ariste est amoureuse de Megacle et Megacle est amoureux d'Ariste. Licida
n’a aucune chance de gagner le cœur d’Ariste et sa tricherie lors de ces Jeux Olympiques est absolument
inacceptable dans le contexte. Il sera forcément découvert et exposé, cette fois sans faute, à la
désapprobation du public et en premier lieu du roi local, le père d'Ariste. Effectivement, quand cela est
découvert ou révélé, le roi bannit Licida qui se met en colère et planifie même la mort du roi local, Clistène.
Pendant ce temps, Megacle tente de se suicider lorsqu'il se rend compte, un peu tard, qu'il a triché, ce
qui est assez évident, et il aurait dû le savoir dès le début. Il est sauvé à la dernière minute. Ariste, de son
côté, tente de faire la même chose et est également sauvée à la dernière minute. Découvrant le plan de
Licida pour le tuer, et confronté aux dramatiques tentatives de suicide, le roi décide de faire sacrifier Licida
sur l'autel du temple principal, maintenant qu’il est dénoncé comme un tricheur et un conspirateur. Le roi lui
exauce son dernier souhait alors qu'il est prêt à être exécuté dans le temple : Licida veut dire adieu à
Megacle et lui expliquer à quel point il est désolé. C'est à ce moment-là que se produit le happy-ending.
Le roi reconnaît le pendentif que porte Licida et un rapide deus ex machina amène l'homme qui était
censé exposer Licida à la mer. Il est révélé que Licida avait été sauvé et élevé par le roi de Crète. Le roi
local, malgré ses antécédents, devient finalement un iota plus humain. Il change d'avis, pardonne à son
désormais fils Licida, donne Ariste en mariage à Megacle et impose à Licida d'épouser la femme qu'il avait
abandonnée en Crète, Argène.
L’extrême popularité de cette histoire tordue et à bien des égards perverse sur les scènes d’opéra
italiennes et européennes au XVIIIe siècle, avant la Révolution française, révèle à quel point la situation
devait être explosive en Europe à cette époque. Même Mozart est tombé dans ce piège populaire, même s'il
ira au moins cent milles plus loin avec son Noces de Figaro, essentiellement parce qu'il a utilisé la pièce de
Beaumarchais située dans la société française moderne de l'époque, exposant et dénonçant ainsi les
privilèges des nobles et des aristocrates, leur manque total d'humanité pour obtenir leur propre plaisir auprès
de personnes qui n'étaient pas du tout consentantes.
Mais nous sommes donc arrivés au bout de cette intrigue, et Antonio Vivaldi a fait de cette histoire un
opéra qui n'est pas le seul, peut-être pas le meilleur, mais certainement l'un des dizaines d'opéras sur ce
livret qui mérite d'être préservé, savouré et apprécié. L’opéra original peut durer trois heures et demie dans
la version de Baldassare Galuppi, et cet enregistrement ne dure que deux heures et douze minutes. Le livret
était connu à l’époque pour être extrêmement long en raison des récitatifs verbeux. Le librettiste a connu un
changement radical dans sa carrière, avant et après le décès d'un de ses mécènes. Le nouveau mécène
décide de ne lui commander que des pièces plus courtes et non plus ses énormes opéras. Cet
enregistrement de l’adaptation de Vivaldi ne contient pas tous les récitatifs et se concentre sur les arias,
duos et autres parties hautement lyriques, et fait des coupes sombres dans les sections purement narratives
les plus longues.
Maintenant, nous pouvons écouter la musique et ne plus considérer qu’elle.
La musique est légère, très légère même, peut-être trop légère. Les acteurs discutent de questions qui
signifient pour eux la vie ou la mort, comme s'il s'agissait d'une partie de poker informelle.
Le choix des différentes voix n'est pas le meilleur. Ariste aurait été meilleure en tant que soprano. Je
trouve sa texture mezzo-soprano un peu trop sombre, peut-être justifiée par le père qu'elle a, mais elle parle
d'amour comme si elle enterrait sa chère grand-mère aimante. Argène, la première femme courtisée par
Licida, est aussi une mezzo-soprano, une voix dictée par le lien avec Licida et le fait qu'elle est déguisée en
homme. Mais cela réduit les deux femmes à un ton sombre et de second rang, comme si être aimée, être
désirée par Licida, ou désirer Licida était une malédiction. C'est probablement le cas, mais le choix n'est pas
le meilleur car les deux femmes ne se montrent pas dominantes et fougueuses comme tout amante devrait
l'être, et ici elles ressortent, toutes les deux, comme maternelles, à bien des égards frustrantes,
réprimandant et semonçant leurs familiers. Qu’est-ce qui est tellement attrayant chez elles?
Licida est une autre histoire. Il est contre-ténor et était dans la version originelle une femme contralto
travestie à l’époque de Vivaldi, ce qui semble étrange pour ce personnage phallocrate. Mais Gérard Lesne a
une belle voix même si un peu trop grave pour être un vrai castrat, ou presque. La partition a-t-elle été
composée pour ce rendu ? Comment le savoir, mais Licida est très mystérieux, inquiétant même, complotant
en coulisses, et ce n’est pas une impression, car c’est bien ce qu’il est en train de faire. Ainsi une voix plus
conquérante, revêche, rauque, ou bien ouvertement efféminée tout en étant graveleuse aurait été la
bienvenue, la voix d’une fumeuse invétérée.
Mais le choix d'une soprano pour Megacle est pour moi une totale erreur. C'est le champion, le héros. Il
doit être le contre-ténor aigu qui peut créer la crainte et faire couler le sang avec une seule note aérienne, et
ce n'est pas le cas car les harmoniques ne sont pas des harmoniques masculines. Vivaldi n’a pas composé
la partition de cette façon. Il avait un castrat, la voix des héros du 18ème siècle. Une soprano féminine n’est
donc pas le meilleur choix. Le public devrait se sentir impressionné et ravi par chaque mouvement de
Megacle sur scène. Il est le champion, le héros, l’homme que tout le monde doit admirer, et cet homme doit
être un homme, pas une soprano féminine, d’où un castrat à l’époque de Vivaldi et un contre-ténor à
l’époque moderne.
L'enregistrement a été réalisé en 1990, avant Philippe Jaroussky, mais il y avait à l'époque d'autres
contre-ténors en Europe. C'est vrai qu'il n'y en avait pas beaucoup, mais James Bowman était plutôt
disponible. Clistene est parfaitement choisi avec sa voix de basse. C'est le dictateur que nous attendons, et
il ne nous déçoit pas : inhumain, tyrannique, ouvertement capricieux, fantasque et têtu et on peut se
demander de quelle façon il est en quoi que ce soit attirant, plaisant, attachant. Il chante comme s’il avait un
marteau de maçon entre les dents, prêt à vous pulvériser et broyer le crâne de quiconque se mettrait en
travers de son chemin.
Je dois admettre que la deuxième basse est l'autre homme connecté à Clistene, son ami, son
conseiller, son compagnon d'aventure, Alcandre. Licida est pris entre deux basses qui le réduisent en
bouillie, et il est d'autre part pris entre deux mezzo-sopranos qui ne peuvent rivaliser avec les basses qui
vous martèlent les oreilles. Cela laisse Licida seul maître de son petit cercle tricheur, égocentrique et
magouilleur. Certains pourraient me dire que c’est parfaitement calculé. Et je serais d'accord. Mais cela peut
être vu comme la révélation d’une situation si pitoyable, et d’un roi tout autant pitoyable qu’impitoyable, et
qui fait donc pitié, et de son fils baroudeur, insaisissable et drolatique, Licida, qui vient d’un autre univers, un
trou noir, une jungle galactique.
Je dois admettre que je préfère la distribution originale quand je considère la drupe à l’énorme noyau
indigeste de cette fable de tricherie corrompue aux Jeux Olympiques. Licida en contralto féminin travesti
révélant ainsi sa nature fondamentale de faux gentilhomme, de faux lutteur sportif, de faux amant aussi. Et il
est entouré de deux vrais castrats qualifiés de soprani, sachant que les castrats étaient des héros,
notamment les guerriers. Megacle est un tel héros du stade ou de l'arène des Jeux Olympiques, et Aminta
est le précepteur de Licida et en tant que tel, il est un autre type de héros : celui qui essaie d'éduquer ce
faux fils de roi, et ce doit être une tâche herculéenne : rappelez-vous que Licida est le fils adoptif (qui ne le
sait pas) du roi de Crète (qui le sait), et le vrai fils (qui ne le sait pas) de Clistène le roi de Sicyone (qui ne le
sait pas non plus).
Et à la fin, ce méli-mélo se résume à une solution en forme de tragicomique heureux. Tout le monde est
pardonné ou gracié, les deux jeunes gens (même si l'un n'est pas vraiment civilisé) sont mariés à deux
demoiselles et au moins un couple sur deux est vraiment amoureux. L'autre couple est voué à divorcer, chair
ou viande, probablement après une bonne vieille violence domestique à la grecque antique. Souvenez-vous
d'Agamemnon et d’Iphigénie.
Mais vous constaterez dans cet enregistrement que l'opéra a été réduit d'un tiers (en coupant de
grosses sections des récitatifs qui comprenaient parfois des petits arias, des petits duos ou des chœurs un
peu élaborés). L'enregistrement contient alors essentiellement des arias, et vous pouvez vous concentrer
sur leur beauté. Vivaldi était un génie pour de telles compositions, légères et pourtant parfois sombres,
attrayantes comme l'enfer et parfois légèrement répétitives comme la vie. Un air à l'époque était
généralement composé de deux sections égales et le chant était répétitif quant aux paroles mais avec des
variations sur la musique. Vivaldi va au-delà de ce qui se fait généralement. La première partie deux fois,
puis la deuxième partie, souvent une seule fois, parfois deux fois, puis retour à la première partie une ou
parfois deux fois. Vivaldi compose des arias à trois parties, et il ose répéter certaines de ces parties trois
fois, ce qui rend les arias fascinants, peut-être même hypnotisants, comme subjuguants.
Dr Jacques COULARDEAU
EMPATHETICALLY PATHETIC VIVALDI

Contenu connexe

Similaire à EMPATHETICALLY PATHETIC VIVALDI

TRAVAIL DE JAIME VELÁZQUEZ ÍSCAR ET LORENZO LOPEZ PEINADO (3 TRIM)
TRAVAIL DE JAIME VELÁZQUEZ ÍSCAR ET LORENZO LOPEZ PEINADO (3 TRIM)TRAVAIL DE JAIME VELÁZQUEZ ÍSCAR ET LORENZO LOPEZ PEINADO (3 TRIM)
TRAVAIL DE JAIME VELÁZQUEZ ÍSCAR ET LORENZO LOPEZ PEINADO (3 TRIM)
manusp14
 
Zelda et scott Théâtre La Coupole Saint-Louis 4 novembre 2014
Zelda et scott Théâtre La Coupole Saint-Louis 4 novembre 2014Zelda et scott Théâtre La Coupole Saint-Louis 4 novembre 2014
Zelda et scott Théâtre La Coupole Saint-Louis 4 novembre 2014
Bâle Région Mag
 
Shakespeare l’ICONOCLASTE
Shakespeare l’ICONOCLASTEShakespeare l’ICONOCLASTE
Shakespeare l’ICONOCLASTE
Editions La Dondaine
 
Les productions Etincelle
Les productions EtincelleLes productions Etincelle
Les productions Etincelle
Compagnie Etincelle
 
Le comte de Monte-Cristo
Le comte de Monte-CristoLe comte de Monte-Cristo
Le comte de Monte-Cristo
Mercedes Espinosa Contreras
 
Divine Triad of Musical Love
Divine Triad of Musical LoveDivine Triad of Musical Love
Divine Triad of Musical Love
Editions La Dondaine
 
Invading Good Samaritan
Invading Good SamaritanInvading Good Samaritan
Invading Good Samaritan
Editions La Dondaine
 
2.Les tragédies de William Shakespeare dans la peinture (2).ppsx
2.Les tragédies de William Shakespeare dans la peinture (2).ppsx2.Les tragédies de William Shakespeare dans la peinture (2).ppsx
2.Les tragédies de William Shakespeare dans la peinture (2).ppsx
guimera
 
Une petite histoire du théâtre [enregistrement automatique]
Une petite histoire du théâtre [enregistrement automatique]Une petite histoire du théâtre [enregistrement automatique]
Une petite histoire du théâtre [enregistrement automatique]
Jeff Laroumagne
 
Jean baptiste poquelin
Jean baptiste poquelinJean baptiste poquelin
Jean baptiste poquelin
bullaribera
 
Edmond Rostand, FRNC 281
Edmond Rostand, FRNC 281Edmond Rostand, FRNC 281
Edmond Rostand, FRNC 281
tkwong724
 
L’enlèvement de Mlle de Montmorency-Boutteville et de la fille de Lope de Veg...
L’enlèvement de Mlle de Montmorency-Boutteville et de la fille de Lope de Veg...L’enlèvement de Mlle de Montmorency-Boutteville et de la fille de Lope de Veg...
L’enlèvement de Mlle de Montmorency-Boutteville et de la fille de Lope de Veg...
Universidad Complutense de Madrid
 
Un Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
Un Chapeau De Paille D’ItalieUn Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
Un Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
marysebrisson
 
Un Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
Un Chapeau De Paille D’ItalieUn Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
Un Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
marysebrisson
 
Divina Maria Version FrançAise
Divina Maria Version FrançAiseDivina Maria Version FrançAise
Divina Maria Version FrançAise
gabriellaroma
 
Les marionnettes parisiennes
Les marionnettes parisiennesLes marionnettes parisiennes
Les marionnettes parisiennes
Histoires2Paris
 
Comparaison entre paul verlaine et voltaire
Comparaison entre paul verlaine et voltaireComparaison entre paul verlaine et voltaire
Comparaison entre paul verlaine et voltaire
Javeria Zia
 
Le-bourgeois-gentilhomme.pptx
Le-bourgeois-gentilhomme.pptxLe-bourgeois-gentilhomme.pptx
Le-bourgeois-gentilhomme.pptx
BouchikhiTech
 

Similaire à EMPATHETICALLY PATHETIC VIVALDI (20)

TRAVAIL DE JAIME VELÁZQUEZ ÍSCAR ET LORENZO LOPEZ PEINADO (3 TRIM)
TRAVAIL DE JAIME VELÁZQUEZ ÍSCAR ET LORENZO LOPEZ PEINADO (3 TRIM)TRAVAIL DE JAIME VELÁZQUEZ ÍSCAR ET LORENZO LOPEZ PEINADO (3 TRIM)
TRAVAIL DE JAIME VELÁZQUEZ ÍSCAR ET LORENZO LOPEZ PEINADO (3 TRIM)
 
Zelda et scott Théâtre La Coupole Saint-Louis 4 novembre 2014
Zelda et scott Théâtre La Coupole Saint-Louis 4 novembre 2014Zelda et scott Théâtre La Coupole Saint-Louis 4 novembre 2014
Zelda et scott Théâtre La Coupole Saint-Louis 4 novembre 2014
 
Shakespeare l’ICONOCLASTE
Shakespeare l’ICONOCLASTEShakespeare l’ICONOCLASTE
Shakespeare l’ICONOCLASTE
 
Les productions Etincelle
Les productions EtincelleLes productions Etincelle
Les productions Etincelle
 
Le comte de Monte-Cristo
Le comte de Monte-CristoLe comte de Monte-Cristo
Le comte de Monte-Cristo
 
Victor hugo
Victor hugoVictor hugo
Victor hugo
 
Divine Triad of Musical Love
Divine Triad of Musical LoveDivine Triad of Musical Love
Divine Triad of Musical Love
 
Invading Good Samaritan
Invading Good SamaritanInvading Good Samaritan
Invading Good Samaritan
 
2.Les tragédies de William Shakespeare dans la peinture (2).ppsx
2.Les tragédies de William Shakespeare dans la peinture (2).ppsx2.Les tragédies de William Shakespeare dans la peinture (2).ppsx
2.Les tragédies de William Shakespeare dans la peinture (2).ppsx
 
Une petite histoire du théâtre [enregistrement automatique]
Une petite histoire du théâtre [enregistrement automatique]Une petite histoire du théâtre [enregistrement automatique]
Une petite histoire du théâtre [enregistrement automatique]
 
Jean baptiste poquelin
Jean baptiste poquelinJean baptiste poquelin
Jean baptiste poquelin
 
Edmond Rostand, FRNC 281
Edmond Rostand, FRNC 281Edmond Rostand, FRNC 281
Edmond Rostand, FRNC 281
 
Le Petit Prince
Le Petit PrinceLe Petit Prince
Le Petit Prince
 
L’enlèvement de Mlle de Montmorency-Boutteville et de la fille de Lope de Veg...
L’enlèvement de Mlle de Montmorency-Boutteville et de la fille de Lope de Veg...L’enlèvement de Mlle de Montmorency-Boutteville et de la fille de Lope de Veg...
L’enlèvement de Mlle de Montmorency-Boutteville et de la fille de Lope de Veg...
 
Un Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
Un Chapeau De Paille D’ItalieUn Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
Un Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
 
Un Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
Un Chapeau De Paille D’ItalieUn Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
Un Chapeau De Paille D’Italie
 
Divina Maria Version FrançAise
Divina Maria Version FrançAiseDivina Maria Version FrançAise
Divina Maria Version FrançAise
 
Les marionnettes parisiennes
Les marionnettes parisiennesLes marionnettes parisiennes
Les marionnettes parisiennes
 
Comparaison entre paul verlaine et voltaire
Comparaison entre paul verlaine et voltaireComparaison entre paul verlaine et voltaire
Comparaison entre paul verlaine et voltaire
 
Le-bourgeois-gentilhomme.pptx
Le-bourgeois-gentilhomme.pptxLe-bourgeois-gentilhomme.pptx
Le-bourgeois-gentilhomme.pptx
 

Plus de Editions La Dondaine

La Révolution Bénédictine Casadéenne du Livradois-Forez: De Charlemagne à Fra...
La Révolution Bénédictine Casadéenne du Livradois-Forez: De Charlemagne à Fra...La Révolution Bénédictine Casadéenne du Livradois-Forez: De Charlemagne à Fra...
La Révolution Bénédictine Casadéenne du Livradois-Forez: De Charlemagne à Fra...
Editions La Dondaine
 
DANGEROUS GenAI? TRUE OR DEEP FAKE? YES OR NO?
DANGEROUS GenAI? TRUE OR DEEP FAKE? YES OR NO?DANGEROUS GenAI? TRUE OR DEEP FAKE? YES OR NO?
DANGEROUS GenAI? TRUE OR DEEP FAKE? YES OR NO?
Editions La Dondaine
 
URBAN TREK AFTER ARTS – CLERMONT-FERRAND, FRANCE
URBAN TREK AFTER ARTS – CLERMONT-FERRAND, FRANCEURBAN TREK AFTER ARTS – CLERMONT-FERRAND, FRANCE
URBAN TREK AFTER ARTS – CLERMONT-FERRAND, FRANCE
Editions La Dondaine
 
THE DRAVIDIAN EMPIRE AND THEIR EPIC FAILURE
THE DRAVIDIAN EMPIRE AND THEIR EPIC FAILURETHE DRAVIDIAN EMPIRE AND THEIR EPIC FAILURE
THE DRAVIDIAN EMPIRE AND THEIR EPIC FAILURE
Editions La Dondaine
 
CRIME AND FAMILY DYSTUNCTIONING IN WALES
CRIME AND FAMILY DYSTUNCTIONING  IN WALESCRIME AND FAMILY DYSTUNCTIONING  IN WALES
CRIME AND FAMILY DYSTUNCTIONING IN WALES
Editions La Dondaine
 
LA CHAISE-DIEU MÉDIÉVALE & LA RÉVOLUTION BÉNÉDICTINE--MEDIEVAL LA CHAISE-DIEU...
LA CHAISE-DIEU MÉDIÉVALE & LA RÉVOLUTION BÉNÉDICTINE--MEDIEVAL LA CHAISE-DIEU...LA CHAISE-DIEU MÉDIÉVALE & LA RÉVOLUTION BÉNÉDICTINE--MEDIEVAL LA CHAISE-DIEU...
LA CHAISE-DIEU MÉDIÉVALE & LA RÉVOLUTION BÉNÉDICTINE--MEDIEVAL LA CHAISE-DIEU...
Editions La Dondaine
 
THE INDO-EUROPEAN BIG BANG: The Big Bang Illusion
THE INDO-EUROPEAN BIG BANG: The Big Bang IllusionTHE INDO-EUROPEAN BIG BANG: The Big Bang Illusion
THE INDO-EUROPEAN BIG BANG: The Big Bang Illusion
Editions La Dondaine
 
CRIME OVERALL & POLICE ROUTINE, FOLLOW THE WIND
CRIME OVERALL & POLICE ROUTINE,  FOLLOW THE WINDCRIME OVERALL & POLICE ROUTINE,  FOLLOW THE WIND
CRIME OVERALL & POLICE ROUTINE, FOLLOW THE WIND
Editions La Dondaine
 
Let the Mayas Speak In their old Glyphs
Let  the Mayas Speak In their old GlyphsLet  the Mayas Speak In their old Glyphs
Let the Mayas Speak In their old Glyphs
Editions La Dondaine
 
The 3 Literacies of Modern Age, the Trikirion of Communication
The 3 Literacies of Modern Age, the Trikirion of CommunicationThe 3 Literacies of Modern Age, the Trikirion of Communication
The 3 Literacies of Modern Age, the Trikirion of Communication
Editions La Dondaine
 
SQUEEZED BETWEEN AI & SCREENS, THEATER IS TRULY STRUGGLING
SQUEEZED BETWEEN AI & SCREENS, THEATER IS TRULY STRUGGLINGSQUEEZED BETWEEN AI & SCREENS, THEATER IS TRULY STRUGGLING
SQUEEZED BETWEEN AI & SCREENS, THEATER IS TRULY STRUGGLING
Editions La Dondaine
 
ACTION FILMS = FILMS MONGERING MENTAL ALIENATION
ACTION FILMS = FILMS MONGERING MENTAL ALIENATIONACTION FILMS = FILMS MONGERING MENTAL ALIENATION
ACTION FILMS = FILMS MONGERING MENTAL ALIENATION
Editions La Dondaine
 
IS BUDDHIST NIBBANA WORTH A BOY-TO-BOY’S KISS?
IS BUDDHIST NIBBANA WORTH A BOY-TO-BOY’S KISS?IS BUDDHIST NIBBANA WORTH A BOY-TO-BOY’S KISS?
IS BUDDHIST NIBBANA WORTH A BOY-TO-BOY’S KISS?
Editions La Dondaine
 
OPPENHEIMER, WHEN THE US STARTED TO LOSE THEIR ETHICS
OPPENHEIMER, WHEN THE US STARTED TO LOSE THEIR  ETHICSOPPENHEIMER, WHEN THE US STARTED TO LOSE THEIR  ETHICS
OPPENHEIMER, WHEN THE US STARTED TO LOSE THEIR ETHICS
Editions La Dondaine
 
THIRD UNDERGROUND HELL’S LOUNGE - WELCOME
THIRD UNDERGROUND HELL’S LOUNGE - WELCOMETHIRD UNDERGROUND HELL’S LOUNGE - WELCOME
THIRD UNDERGROUND HELL’S LOUNGE - WELCOME
Editions La Dondaine
 
Too Tricky To Be True, don't you feel it
Too Tricky To Be True, don't you feel itToo Tricky To Be True, don't you feel it
Too Tricky To Be True, don't you feel it
Editions La Dondaine
 
NEVER IMAGINABLE WITH WHITE PEOPLE IN THE LEAD
NEVER IMAGINABLE WITH WHITE PEOPLE IN THE LEADNEVER IMAGINABLE WITH WHITE PEOPLE IN THE LEAD
NEVER IMAGINABLE WITH WHITE PEOPLE IN THE LEAD
Editions La Dondaine
 
EXISTENTIAL DURATION MEASURED BY MAYAN TIME
EXISTENTIAL DURATION MEASURED BY MAYAN TIMEEXISTENTIAL DURATION MEASURED BY MAYAN TIME
EXISTENTIAL DURATION MEASURED BY MAYAN TIME
Editions La Dondaine
 
NO LOVE NO FUTURE NO PEACE
NO LOVE NO FUTURE NO PEACENO LOVE NO FUTURE NO PEACE
NO LOVE NO FUTURE NO PEACE
Editions La Dondaine
 
Poetry Prison Comoro, Railings All Around
Poetry Prison Comoro, Railings All AroundPoetry Prison Comoro, Railings All Around
Poetry Prison Comoro, Railings All Around
Editions La Dondaine
 

Plus de Editions La Dondaine (20)

La Révolution Bénédictine Casadéenne du Livradois-Forez: De Charlemagne à Fra...
La Révolution Bénédictine Casadéenne du Livradois-Forez: De Charlemagne à Fra...La Révolution Bénédictine Casadéenne du Livradois-Forez: De Charlemagne à Fra...
La Révolution Bénédictine Casadéenne du Livradois-Forez: De Charlemagne à Fra...
 
DANGEROUS GenAI? TRUE OR DEEP FAKE? YES OR NO?
DANGEROUS GenAI? TRUE OR DEEP FAKE? YES OR NO?DANGEROUS GenAI? TRUE OR DEEP FAKE? YES OR NO?
DANGEROUS GenAI? TRUE OR DEEP FAKE? YES OR NO?
 
URBAN TREK AFTER ARTS – CLERMONT-FERRAND, FRANCE
URBAN TREK AFTER ARTS – CLERMONT-FERRAND, FRANCEURBAN TREK AFTER ARTS – CLERMONT-FERRAND, FRANCE
URBAN TREK AFTER ARTS – CLERMONT-FERRAND, FRANCE
 
THE DRAVIDIAN EMPIRE AND THEIR EPIC FAILURE
THE DRAVIDIAN EMPIRE AND THEIR EPIC FAILURETHE DRAVIDIAN EMPIRE AND THEIR EPIC FAILURE
THE DRAVIDIAN EMPIRE AND THEIR EPIC FAILURE
 
CRIME AND FAMILY DYSTUNCTIONING IN WALES
CRIME AND FAMILY DYSTUNCTIONING  IN WALESCRIME AND FAMILY DYSTUNCTIONING  IN WALES
CRIME AND FAMILY DYSTUNCTIONING IN WALES
 
LA CHAISE-DIEU MÉDIÉVALE & LA RÉVOLUTION BÉNÉDICTINE--MEDIEVAL LA CHAISE-DIEU...
LA CHAISE-DIEU MÉDIÉVALE & LA RÉVOLUTION BÉNÉDICTINE--MEDIEVAL LA CHAISE-DIEU...LA CHAISE-DIEU MÉDIÉVALE & LA RÉVOLUTION BÉNÉDICTINE--MEDIEVAL LA CHAISE-DIEU...
LA CHAISE-DIEU MÉDIÉVALE & LA RÉVOLUTION BÉNÉDICTINE--MEDIEVAL LA CHAISE-DIEU...
 
THE INDO-EUROPEAN BIG BANG: The Big Bang Illusion
THE INDO-EUROPEAN BIG BANG: The Big Bang IllusionTHE INDO-EUROPEAN BIG BANG: The Big Bang Illusion
THE INDO-EUROPEAN BIG BANG: The Big Bang Illusion
 
CRIME OVERALL & POLICE ROUTINE, FOLLOW THE WIND
CRIME OVERALL & POLICE ROUTINE,  FOLLOW THE WINDCRIME OVERALL & POLICE ROUTINE,  FOLLOW THE WIND
CRIME OVERALL & POLICE ROUTINE, FOLLOW THE WIND
 
Let the Mayas Speak In their old Glyphs
Let  the Mayas Speak In their old GlyphsLet  the Mayas Speak In their old Glyphs
Let the Mayas Speak In their old Glyphs
 
The 3 Literacies of Modern Age, the Trikirion of Communication
The 3 Literacies of Modern Age, the Trikirion of CommunicationThe 3 Literacies of Modern Age, the Trikirion of Communication
The 3 Literacies of Modern Age, the Trikirion of Communication
 
SQUEEZED BETWEEN AI & SCREENS, THEATER IS TRULY STRUGGLING
SQUEEZED BETWEEN AI & SCREENS, THEATER IS TRULY STRUGGLINGSQUEEZED BETWEEN AI & SCREENS, THEATER IS TRULY STRUGGLING
SQUEEZED BETWEEN AI & SCREENS, THEATER IS TRULY STRUGGLING
 
ACTION FILMS = FILMS MONGERING MENTAL ALIENATION
ACTION FILMS = FILMS MONGERING MENTAL ALIENATIONACTION FILMS = FILMS MONGERING MENTAL ALIENATION
ACTION FILMS = FILMS MONGERING MENTAL ALIENATION
 
IS BUDDHIST NIBBANA WORTH A BOY-TO-BOY’S KISS?
IS BUDDHIST NIBBANA WORTH A BOY-TO-BOY’S KISS?IS BUDDHIST NIBBANA WORTH A BOY-TO-BOY’S KISS?
IS BUDDHIST NIBBANA WORTH A BOY-TO-BOY’S KISS?
 
OPPENHEIMER, WHEN THE US STARTED TO LOSE THEIR ETHICS
OPPENHEIMER, WHEN THE US STARTED TO LOSE THEIR  ETHICSOPPENHEIMER, WHEN THE US STARTED TO LOSE THEIR  ETHICS
OPPENHEIMER, WHEN THE US STARTED TO LOSE THEIR ETHICS
 
THIRD UNDERGROUND HELL’S LOUNGE - WELCOME
THIRD UNDERGROUND HELL’S LOUNGE - WELCOMETHIRD UNDERGROUND HELL’S LOUNGE - WELCOME
THIRD UNDERGROUND HELL’S LOUNGE - WELCOME
 
Too Tricky To Be True, don't you feel it
Too Tricky To Be True, don't you feel itToo Tricky To Be True, don't you feel it
Too Tricky To Be True, don't you feel it
 
NEVER IMAGINABLE WITH WHITE PEOPLE IN THE LEAD
NEVER IMAGINABLE WITH WHITE PEOPLE IN THE LEADNEVER IMAGINABLE WITH WHITE PEOPLE IN THE LEAD
NEVER IMAGINABLE WITH WHITE PEOPLE IN THE LEAD
 
EXISTENTIAL DURATION MEASURED BY MAYAN TIME
EXISTENTIAL DURATION MEASURED BY MAYAN TIMEEXISTENTIAL DURATION MEASURED BY MAYAN TIME
EXISTENTIAL DURATION MEASURED BY MAYAN TIME
 
NO LOVE NO FUTURE NO PEACE
NO LOVE NO FUTURE NO PEACENO LOVE NO FUTURE NO PEACE
NO LOVE NO FUTURE NO PEACE
 
Poetry Prison Comoro, Railings All Around
Poetry Prison Comoro, Railings All AroundPoetry Prison Comoro, Railings All Around
Poetry Prison Comoro, Railings All Around
 

EMPATHETICALLY PATHETIC VIVALDI

  • 2. This opera, L’Olimpiade by Vivaldi, is on a libretto by Pietro Metastasio written in 1733 for Antonio Caldara. But then dozens of other composers used the plot and the libretto in many different ways but always with an operatic dimension. Vivaldi was only one of them, and it was used all over Europe, not only in Italy. It is a melodrama from beginning to end using all sorts of plot elements that create the most melodramatic situations in the classic ancient Greek theater. First of all, but revealed only in the last scene, a father and king decides to expose his son to the sea because he does not want a son, or this son. The man entrusted with this mission to throw the baby into the sea does not expose the boy but gives him to the first person he meets on the beach who accepts to take the boy under his custody. The boy is entrusted to that man with only one distinctive element: a necklace that will reveal his real identity at the end of the opera just before having his head cut off. This is the pattern of Oedipus, but in this case, the son does not kill his father nor marry his mother and have children from her, children who are the son and daughter of their own half-brother since they all have the same mother. Second, this boy now a young man is Licida. The man who accepted him is a king on the island of Crete. Licida has a female partner, though not married, in Crete and he abandons her to come to his birthplace, though he does not know it is because he is suddenly attracted by the daughter Aristea of the local King. This father reveals at the very beginning of the opera that he is a monstrous father for the second time in his life though it is long before we learn about his exposing the baby or child Licida, hence for the first time in the opera. He promises to give his daughter in marriage to the man who will win a particular fight in the Olympic Games happening in the same period. But Licida is not a great fighter, he has little chance to win, especially since a champion is entering the fight. Third, Licida is a cheater, born as such and unforgivable and unimprovable. So, since the champion, Megacle, is his friend, he asks him to enter the fight under his name, so that he will be sure to win Aristea. But Aristea is in love with Megacle and Megacle is in love with Aristea. Licida has no chance whatsoever to win Aristea’s heart and his cheating in this Olympic Game is absolutely unacceptable in the context. He is bound to be found out and to be exposed, this time without failing, to the disapproval of the audience and first of all of the local king, the father of Aristea. Sure enough, when it is discovered or revealed the King banishes Licida who gets angry and even plans the death of the local King, Clistene by the way. During that time, Megacle tries to kill himself when he realizes, a little bit too late, that he had been cheating, which is quite obvious, and he should have known that from the very start. He is saved at the last minute or so. Aristea, on her side, tries to do the same thing and is also saved at the last minute. Discovering Licida’s plan to kill him, and confronted with the dramatic suicide attempts, the king decides to have Licida sacrificed on the altar of the main temple, now he is exposed as a cheater and a plotter. The king grants him
  • 3. his last wish when he is ready to be executed in the temple: Licida wants to say farewell to Megacle and explain to him how sorry he is. It is at this moment the happy ending takes place. The king recognizes the pendant Licida is wearing and a quick deus ex machina brings the man who was supposed to expose Licida to the sea. It is revealed that Licida had been saved and raised by the King of Crete. The local king, despite his antecedents finally becomes one iota more humane. He changes his mind, forgives his now son Licida, gives Aristea in marriage to Megacle, and imposes onto Licida to marry the woman he had abandoned in Crete, Argene. The extreme popularity of this twisted and in many ways perverse story on the Italian and European opera stages in the 18th century, before the French Revolution, reveals how explosive the situation must have been in Europe then. Even Mozart fell into this popular trap though he went at least one hundred miles farther with his Marriage of Figaro, essentially because he used Beaumarchais’s play situated in the modern French society of the time, thus exposing and denouncing the privileges of the nobles and their utmost lack of humanity to get their own pleasure from people who did not consent at all. But here we are, and Antonio Vivaldi made this story an opera that is not the only one, maybe not the best one, but certainly one of the dozens of operas based on this libretto that is worth saving, savoring, and enjoying. The original opera can reach three hours and a half in Baldassare Galuppi’s version, and this recording is only two hours and twelve minutes. The libretto was known at the time to be extremely long due to the verbose recitatives. The librettist had a break in his career, before and after the death of one of his patrons. The next generation patron decided to order only shorter pieces from him and no longer his enormous operas. This recording of Vivaldi’s adaptation does not contain all the recitatives and concentrates on the arias, duets, and other fully operatic parts, and cuts short the longer purely narrative sections. Now we can listen to the music and only consider it. The music is light, very light indeed, maybe too light. The actors are discussing questions that mean life or death for them, just as if it were a casual game of poker.
  • 4. The choice of the various voices is not the best. Aristea would have been better as a soprano. I find her mezzo-soprano texture slightly too somber, maybe justified due to the father she has, but she is speaking of love as if she were burying the loving grandmother of her family. Argene, the first woman Licida had courted, is also a mezzo-soprano, a voice dictated by the connection to Licida, and the fact she is disguised as a man. But that reduces the two women to a second-rank, somber tone as if to be loved, desired by, or to desire Licida was a curse. It probably is but the choice is not the best because the two women do not come out dominant and fiery like any female lover should be, and here they come out, both of them, as motherly, in many ways frustrating, reprimanding and chastising counterparts. What is attractive in them at all? Licida is another story. He is a countertenor and was originally a contralto travesti woman in Vivaldi’s time, which sounds strange for this character who is a phallocrat. But Gerard Lesne is a beautiful voice even if slightly too low to be a real castrato, or close to it. Was the score composed for this rendering? How can we know since he is very mysterious, even sort of plotting in the wings of the stage, which he is actually doing, but a more conquering voice would have been good. But the choice of a soprano for Megacle is for me a full mistake. He is the champion, the hero. He has to be the High-pitched Countertenor who can create awe and draw blood just with one sharp note, and this is not the case because the harmonics are not male harmonics. Vivaldi did not compose the score like that. He had a castrato, the voice of heroes in the 18th century. So, a female soprano is not the best choice. The audience should feel awed and elated by every move of Megacle on the stage. He is the champion, the hero, the man everyone must admire, and that man has to be a man, not a female soprano, hence a castrato in Vivaldi’s time and a countertenor in modern times. The recording was done in 1990, before Philippe Jaroussky, but there were other countertenors in Europe at the time. True enough not many, but James Bowman was quite available. Clistene is perfectly chosen with his bass voice. He is the dictator we expect, and he does not disappoint us: inhumane, tyrannical, openly capricious, whimsical, and stubborn and we can wonder in what dimension he is in any way attractive, gentle, appealing. He sings as if with a sledgehammer between his teeth ready to smash and mash the skull of anyone who would stand in his path. I must admit the second bass is the other man connected to Clistene. Licida is taken between two basses that are sledgehammering him into pulp and on the other hand he is caught between two mezzo- sopranos that cannot compete with the sledge-hammering basses. That leaves Licida the master of his
  • 5. cheating egocentric and selfish circle. Some could tell me that is perfectly calculated. And I would agree. But it can be seen as the exposing of such a pitiful situation and a pitiful as much as pitiless king and his mischievous, odd, and droll son Licida who is from another queer and quaint universe. I must admit I liked the original distribution better when I consider the vicious core of this fable of corrupted cheating in the Olympic Games. Licida is a travesti contralto revealing like that his basic nature of a fake gentleman, a fake fighter, and a fake lover too. And he is surrounded by two real castrati described as soprani, knowing castrati were heroes, particularly warriors. Megacle is such a hero of the stadium or the arena of the Olympic Games, and Aminta is Licida’s tutor and as such is another type of hero: the one who is trying to educate this fake son of a king, which must be a herculean task: remember Licida is the adoptive son (who does not know it) of the king of Crete, and the real son of Clistene (who does not know it) the king of Sicyon. In the end, this mishmash is smoothened down to a very happy solution. Everyone is forgiven or pardoned, the two younger gentlemen (though one is not really a gentleman) are married to two young ladies and at least one couple out of two is really in love. The other couple is bound to become divorcing flesh or meat, probably after some good old Ancient Greek domestic violence. Remember Agamemnon. Remember the Alamo. But you will find in this recording that reduced the opera by one-third (by cutting off big sections of recitatives that included at times some more elaborate arias, duets, or choirs. The recording then contains essentially arias, and you can concentrate on the beauty of these arias. Vivaldi was a genius for such compositions, light and yet at times somber, appealing like hell, and at times slightly repetitive. An aria at the time was generally composed of two equal sections and the singing was repetitive as for the words but with variations on the music. Vivaldi goes beyond what is generally done. The first part twice, then the second part, often only once, at times twice, and then back to the first part once or at times twice. Vivaldi composes arias with three parts, and he dares repeat some of these parts three times. That makes them mesmerizing, maybe even hypnotizing. Dr. Jacques COULARDEAU Cet opéra, L'Olimpiade de Vivaldi, est sur un livret de Pietro Metastasio écrit en 1733 pour Antonio Caldara. Mais ensuite des dizaines d’autres compositeurs ont utilisé l’intrigue et le livret de différentes manières, mais toujours avec une dimension lyrique. Vivaldi n’était que l’un d’entre eux, et ce livret fut utilisé
  • 6. dans toute l’Europe, pas seulement en Italie. Il s'agit d'un mélodrame du début à la fin utilisant toutes sortes d'éléments d'intrigue qui utilisent les situations les plus mélodramatiques du théâtre grec antique classique. Tout d'abord, mais révélé seulement dans la dernière scène, un père et roi décide d'exposer son fils à la mer car il ne veut pas de fils, ou pas de ce fils. L'homme chargé de cette mission de jeter le bébé à la mer, ne noie pas le garçon mais le confie à la première personne qu'il rencontre sur la plage et qui accepte de prendre le garçon sous sa garde. Le garçon est confié à cet homme avec un seul élément distinctif : un collier avec un médaillon qui révélera sa véritable identité à la fin de l'opéra juste avant qu’on ne lui coupe la tête. C'est une copie conforme d'Œdipe, mais dans ce cas le fils ne tue pas son père ni n'épouse sa mère et n'a pas des enfants d'elle, des enfants qui sont le fils et la fille de leur propre demi-frère puisqu'ils ont tous la même mère. Deuxièmement, ce garçon maintenant jeune homme est Licida. L'homme qui l'a accepté est roi de l'île de Crète. Licida a une compagne, bien qu’ils ne soient pas mariés, en Crète et il l'abandonne pour venir dans sa ville natale, sans savoir que c’est sa ville natale, car il est soudainement attiré par la fille Aristée du roi local, le père de Licida, bien que Licida ne le sache pas, du moins pas plus que le roi local. Ce père révèle au tout début de l'opéra qu'il est un père monstrueux pour la deuxième fois de sa vie, même s'il faut attendre longtemps avant d'apprendre qu'il a exposé le bébé ou l'enfant Licida, donc pour la première fois dans l'opéra. Il promet de donner sa fille en mariage à l'homme qui remportera un combat particulier aux Jeux Olympiques qui se déroulent dans la même période. Mais Licida n'est pas un grand champion en lutte, il a peu de chances de gagner, d'autant plus qu'un champion entre dans le combat. Troisièmement, Licida est un tricheur, comme de naissance, qu’on ne peut ni pardonner ni améliorer. Ainsi, puisque le champion, Megacle, est son ami, il lui demande d'entrer dans le combat sous son nom, afin d'être sûr de gagner Ariste. Mais Ariste est amoureuse de Megacle et Megacle est amoureux d'Ariste. Licida n’a aucune chance de gagner le cœur d’Ariste et sa tricherie lors de ces Jeux Olympiques est absolument inacceptable dans le contexte. Il sera forcément découvert et exposé, cette fois sans faute, à la désapprobation du public et en premier lieu du roi local, le père d'Ariste. Effectivement, quand cela est découvert ou révélé, le roi bannit Licida qui se met en colère et planifie même la mort du roi local, Clistène. Pendant ce temps, Megacle tente de se suicider lorsqu'il se rend compte, un peu tard, qu'il a triché, ce qui est assez évident, et il aurait dû le savoir dès le début. Il est sauvé à la dernière minute. Ariste, de son
  • 7. côté, tente de faire la même chose et est également sauvée à la dernière minute. Découvrant le plan de Licida pour le tuer, et confronté aux dramatiques tentatives de suicide, le roi décide de faire sacrifier Licida sur l'autel du temple principal, maintenant qu’il est dénoncé comme un tricheur et un conspirateur. Le roi lui exauce son dernier souhait alors qu'il est prêt à être exécuté dans le temple : Licida veut dire adieu à Megacle et lui expliquer à quel point il est désolé. C'est à ce moment-là que se produit le happy-ending. Le roi reconnaît le pendentif que porte Licida et un rapide deus ex machina amène l'homme qui était censé exposer Licida à la mer. Il est révélé que Licida avait été sauvé et élevé par le roi de Crète. Le roi local, malgré ses antécédents, devient finalement un iota plus humain. Il change d'avis, pardonne à son désormais fils Licida, donne Ariste en mariage à Megacle et impose à Licida d'épouser la femme qu'il avait abandonnée en Crète, Argène. L’extrême popularité de cette histoire tordue et à bien des égards perverse sur les scènes d’opéra italiennes et européennes au XVIIIe siècle, avant la Révolution française, révèle à quel point la situation devait être explosive en Europe à cette époque. Même Mozart est tombé dans ce piège populaire, même s'il ira au moins cent milles plus loin avec son Noces de Figaro, essentiellement parce qu'il a utilisé la pièce de Beaumarchais située dans la société française moderne de l'époque, exposant et dénonçant ainsi les privilèges des nobles et des aristocrates, leur manque total d'humanité pour obtenir leur propre plaisir auprès de personnes qui n'étaient pas du tout consentantes. Mais nous sommes donc arrivés au bout de cette intrigue, et Antonio Vivaldi a fait de cette histoire un opéra qui n'est pas le seul, peut-être pas le meilleur, mais certainement l'un des dizaines d'opéras sur ce livret qui mérite d'être préservé, savouré et apprécié. L’opéra original peut durer trois heures et demie dans la version de Baldassare Galuppi, et cet enregistrement ne dure que deux heures et douze minutes. Le livret était connu à l’époque pour être extrêmement long en raison des récitatifs verbeux. Le librettiste a connu un changement radical dans sa carrière, avant et après le décès d'un de ses mécènes. Le nouveau mécène décide de ne lui commander que des pièces plus courtes et non plus ses énormes opéras. Cet enregistrement de l’adaptation de Vivaldi ne contient pas tous les récitatifs et se concentre sur les arias, duos et autres parties hautement lyriques, et fait des coupes sombres dans les sections purement narratives les plus longues. Maintenant, nous pouvons écouter la musique et ne plus considérer qu’elle. La musique est légère, très légère même, peut-être trop légère. Les acteurs discutent de questions qui signifient pour eux la vie ou la mort, comme s'il s'agissait d'une partie de poker informelle.
  • 8. Le choix des différentes voix n'est pas le meilleur. Ariste aurait été meilleure en tant que soprano. Je trouve sa texture mezzo-soprano un peu trop sombre, peut-être justifiée par le père qu'elle a, mais elle parle d'amour comme si elle enterrait sa chère grand-mère aimante. Argène, la première femme courtisée par Licida, est aussi une mezzo-soprano, une voix dictée par le lien avec Licida et le fait qu'elle est déguisée en homme. Mais cela réduit les deux femmes à un ton sombre et de second rang, comme si être aimée, être désirée par Licida, ou désirer Licida était une malédiction. C'est probablement le cas, mais le choix n'est pas le meilleur car les deux femmes ne se montrent pas dominantes et fougueuses comme tout amante devrait l'être, et ici elles ressortent, toutes les deux, comme maternelles, à bien des égards frustrantes, réprimandant et semonçant leurs familiers. Qu’est-ce qui est tellement attrayant chez elles? Licida est une autre histoire. Il est contre-ténor et était dans la version originelle une femme contralto travestie à l’époque de Vivaldi, ce qui semble étrange pour ce personnage phallocrate. Mais Gérard Lesne a une belle voix même si un peu trop grave pour être un vrai castrat, ou presque. La partition a-t-elle été composée pour ce rendu ? Comment le savoir, mais Licida est très mystérieux, inquiétant même, complotant en coulisses, et ce n’est pas une impression, car c’est bien ce qu’il est en train de faire. Ainsi une voix plus conquérante, revêche, rauque, ou bien ouvertement efféminée tout en étant graveleuse aurait été la bienvenue, la voix d’une fumeuse invétérée. Mais le choix d'une soprano pour Megacle est pour moi une totale erreur. C'est le champion, le héros. Il doit être le contre-ténor aigu qui peut créer la crainte et faire couler le sang avec une seule note aérienne, et ce n'est pas le cas car les harmoniques ne sont pas des harmoniques masculines. Vivaldi n’a pas composé la partition de cette façon. Il avait un castrat, la voix des héros du 18ème siècle. Une soprano féminine n’est donc pas le meilleur choix. Le public devrait se sentir impressionné et ravi par chaque mouvement de Megacle sur scène. Il est le champion, le héros, l’homme que tout le monde doit admirer, et cet homme doit être un homme, pas une soprano féminine, d’où un castrat à l’époque de Vivaldi et un contre-ténor à l’époque moderne. L'enregistrement a été réalisé en 1990, avant Philippe Jaroussky, mais il y avait à l'époque d'autres contre-ténors en Europe. C'est vrai qu'il n'y en avait pas beaucoup, mais James Bowman était plutôt disponible. Clistene est parfaitement choisi avec sa voix de basse. C'est le dictateur que nous attendons, et il ne nous déçoit pas : inhumain, tyrannique, ouvertement capricieux, fantasque et têtu et on peut se demander de quelle façon il est en quoi que ce soit attirant, plaisant, attachant. Il chante comme s’il avait un
  • 9. marteau de maçon entre les dents, prêt à vous pulvériser et broyer le crâne de quiconque se mettrait en travers de son chemin. Je dois admettre que la deuxième basse est l'autre homme connecté à Clistene, son ami, son conseiller, son compagnon d'aventure, Alcandre. Licida est pris entre deux basses qui le réduisent en bouillie, et il est d'autre part pris entre deux mezzo-sopranos qui ne peuvent rivaliser avec les basses qui vous martèlent les oreilles. Cela laisse Licida seul maître de son petit cercle tricheur, égocentrique et magouilleur. Certains pourraient me dire que c’est parfaitement calculé. Et je serais d'accord. Mais cela peut être vu comme la révélation d’une situation si pitoyable, et d’un roi tout autant pitoyable qu’impitoyable, et qui fait donc pitié, et de son fils baroudeur, insaisissable et drolatique, Licida, qui vient d’un autre univers, un trou noir, une jungle galactique. Je dois admettre que je préfère la distribution originale quand je considère la drupe à l’énorme noyau indigeste de cette fable de tricherie corrompue aux Jeux Olympiques. Licida en contralto féminin travesti révélant ainsi sa nature fondamentale de faux gentilhomme, de faux lutteur sportif, de faux amant aussi. Et il est entouré de deux vrais castrats qualifiés de soprani, sachant que les castrats étaient des héros, notamment les guerriers. Megacle est un tel héros du stade ou de l'arène des Jeux Olympiques, et Aminta est le précepteur de Licida et en tant que tel, il est un autre type de héros : celui qui essaie d'éduquer ce faux fils de roi, et ce doit être une tâche herculéenne : rappelez-vous que Licida est le fils adoptif (qui ne le sait pas) du roi de Crète (qui le sait), et le vrai fils (qui ne le sait pas) de Clistène le roi de Sicyone (qui ne le sait pas non plus). Et à la fin, ce méli-mélo se résume à une solution en forme de tragicomique heureux. Tout le monde est pardonné ou gracié, les deux jeunes gens (même si l'un n'est pas vraiment civilisé) sont mariés à deux demoiselles et au moins un couple sur deux est vraiment amoureux. L'autre couple est voué à divorcer, chair ou viande, probablement après une bonne vieille violence domestique à la grecque antique. Souvenez-vous d'Agamemnon et d’Iphigénie. Mais vous constaterez dans cet enregistrement que l'opéra a été réduit d'un tiers (en coupant de grosses sections des récitatifs qui comprenaient parfois des petits arias, des petits duos ou des chœurs un peu élaborés). L'enregistrement contient alors essentiellement des arias, et vous pouvez vous concentrer sur leur beauté. Vivaldi était un génie pour de telles compositions, légères et pourtant parfois sombres, attrayantes comme l'enfer et parfois légèrement répétitives comme la vie. Un air à l'époque était généralement composé de deux sections égales et le chant était répétitif quant aux paroles mais avec des variations sur la musique. Vivaldi va au-delà de ce qui se fait généralement. La première partie deux fois, puis la deuxième partie, souvent une seule fois, parfois deux fois, puis retour à la première partie une ou parfois deux fois. Vivaldi compose des arias à trois parties, et il ose répéter certaines de ces parties trois fois, ce qui rend les arias fascinants, peut-être même hypnotisants, comme subjuguants. Dr Jacques COULARDEAU